Kestrel Lee's Creative mornings session on social currency

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Kestrel Lee's Creative Morning topic was about how individuals can use emotion design to create social currency around brands, products and even creative professionals. This thinking is designed to simulate deeper emotional engagement and social interactions between the target audience and even the most ordinary object. It can even be used to provide the stimulus for a social and technology movement that betters society like Earth Hour: http://www.creativemornings.com/cmsingapore.eventbrite.com

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  • https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/soc.culture.malaysia/TWM7-fxjnXILast week, as I was interviewing European business school Insead's Asian campus dean, Professor Arnoud De Meyer, I, too, found myself nodding - sometimes sheepishly - to his observation that 'satisfactory under-performance', or mediocrity, rules here. The most lamentable thing about his comments is not that Singapore is not good enough, but that it is not as good as it should be. Although, to be sure, pockets of excellence exist here.Often trotted-out examples are our high-flying Singapore Airlines,prized Changi Airport, much-lauded mathematics scores, clean civilservice and the ever-Creative Mr Sim Wong Hoo. Still, most will agree superlativeness is the exception, rather thanthe norm, here.The drive to be world class, most of those polled feel, is largely atop-down initiative derived from 'overachievers' within theGovernment. But the general populace falls far short of similarlylofty aspirations.
  • http://adage.com/article/cmo-strategy/emotional-messages-beat-rational/134920/It turns out that emotional campaigns in general generate a wider range of desirable business effects, each of which plays its part in improving profitability. But they excel in one noteworthy area: reducing price sensitivity, and hence strengthening the ability of brands to secure a premium in the marketplace (or, in the current economic climate, to hold firm on pricing).
  • http://adage.com/article/cmo-strategy/emotional-messages-beat-rational/134920/It turns out that emotional campaigns in general generate a wider range of desirable business effects, each of which plays its part in improving profitability. But they excel in one noteworthy area: reducing price sensitivity, and hence strengthening the ability of brands to secure a premium in the marketplace (or, in the current economic climate, to hold firm on pricing).
  • Red Bull has a long history of producing high-end events and content beloved by exactly the kinds of people that you’d think would love Red Bull content, and Red Bull itself. But during the event, Red Bull Stratos was trending (under a few different headings) on Twitter, as everyone from athletes to magazines like GQ and social media pundits to the Gates Foundation tweeted about the event in admiring tones. When do you ever see that type of reception to a branded event? Not often.A great example of emotional design: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHtvDA0W34I
  • [How Apple uses emotion design to make its fans devoted employees, as well as customers]www.nytimes.com/2012/06/24/business/apple-store-workers-loyal-but-short-on-pay.html… Within this world, the Apple Store is the undisputed king, a retail phenomenon renowned for impeccable design, deft service and spectacular revenues. Last year, the company’s 327 global stores took in more money per square foot than any other United States retailer — wireless or otherwise — and almost double that of Tiffany, which was No. 2 on the list, according to the research firm RetailSails.Worldwide, its stores sold $16 billion in merchandise.But most of Apple’s employees enjoyed little of that wealth. While consumers tend to think of Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., as the company’s heart and soul, a majority of its workers in the United States are not engineers or executives with hefty salaries and bonuses but rather hourly wage earners selling iPhones and MacBooks….… But Apple’s success, it turns out, rests on a set of intangibles; foremost among them is a built-in fan base that ensures a steady supply of eager applicants and an employee culture that tries to turn every job into an exalted mission.This is why Apple can do something unique in the annals of retailing: pay a modest hourly wage, and no commission, to employees who typically have college degrees and who at the highest performing levels can move as much as $3 million in goods a year.“When you’re working for Apple you feel like you’re working for this greater good,” says a former salesman who asked for anonymity because he didn’t want to draw attention to himself. “That’s why they don’t have a revolution on their hands.”… “My dream my whole life was to work for Apple and suddenly, you can,” he said. “You’ve always been an evangelist for Apple and now you can get paid for it.”…That empowerment is important because aspiring sales employees would clearly be better off working at one of the country’s other big sellers of Apple products, AT&T and Verizon Wireless, if they were searching for a hefty paycheck. Both offer sales commissions.“It’s not at all common but there are sales agents at Verizon who earn six figures,” says Jonathan Jarboe, who managed Verizon Wireless stores in Oklahoma until last summer. Several former Verizon Wireless managers said that annual pay ran from $35,000 up to $100,000 in rare cases, with the sweet spot in the $50,000 to $60,000 range.At Apple, the decision not to offer commissions was made, Ms. Bruno said, before a store had opened. The idea was that such incentives would work against the company’s primary goals — finding customers the right products, rather than the most expensive ones, and establishing long-term rapport with the brand. Commissions, it was also thought, would foster employee competition, which would undermine camaraderie.The iPhone, which arrived in 2007, brought unprecedented crowds to Apple Stores. The company tried to hang on to its culture, but naturally it changed, and in many ways, say some former employees, for the worse.Arthur Zarate, who joined Apple in 2004 and later worked as a technician at the store in Mission Viejo, Calif., says his training left him with a sense of ownership and pride. For a while, he loved the job, in large part because it delivered the simple and gratifying sense that he was helping people. There were time constraints on technicians — 20 minutes per customer — but because the store was rarely swamped, he usually had more time than that.“My customers knew me by name,” he said. “That was a big deal.”
  • We were asked to do a campaign to drive Dove gifting sales in the 3-4 weeks before Chinese Valentine’s Day. Mindful that Chinese netizens looked online for gift ideas for their loved ones, the agency brought to life an online romance that grew sales and momentum via social networks. The results:Dove Gifting sales grew by 226% during that period (i.e.50% of the sales for all Dove chocolates.)3,272,391 unique impressions on major social networks, which was 765% of the KPIsCampaign content brought 848,359 click through traffic from social networks47,683 retweet/sharing of his post on major social networks.34,328 comments on Ma Jin’s project on social network.Campaign became a leading search trend titled “Carriage boy”Reported in the newspapers without paid media budgetLast but not least, a happily married couple
  • Kestrel Lee's Creative mornings session on social currency

    1. 1. Creating social currencyaround brands or you.On applying emotion design to our work and lives
    2. 2. SOCIAL CURRENCY: CREATINGA PLACE OR “WORLD OF YOU ” OUR PERSONALLITY, ACTIONS AND WORK ON SOCIAL MEDIA DEFINES A NEW WORLD THAT WE LIVE IN…. ONLINE.
    3. 3. SOCIAL CURRENCY IS ABOUT WHAT WE DO OR SAY ONLINE AND HOW PEOPLE FEEL OR ACT TOWARDS IT THE CHANGE THE DESIRENew Habits, Rituals and Behaviors DESIRE TO IMPRESS FUTUREthat contribute to success in core FRIENDS, WIFE AND EMPLOYERS areas of life  SOCIAL CURRENCY OPPORTUNITY THE NEED  CREATING POSITIVE SOCIAL WANT TO MAKE A FIRST GOOD REPUTATION AND WORLD OF IMPRESSION ONLINE MOUTH WILL ENHANCE PERSONAL CONFIDENCE AND CHANCES FOR Brian Solis on this subject: SUCCESS IN CAREER, SOCIAL &www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9IJWrG3-s0 ROMANCE
    4. 4. WHAT IS SOCIAL CURRENCY? Social currency: Inspired by Pierre Bourdieu’s social capital theory, it is about increasing one’s sense of community, granting access to information and knowledge, helping to form one’s identity, and providing status and recognition. It is about creating the necessarypurpose, emotion and even identity that can drive people’sbehavior, their sense of community and even sense of self- worth. Let’s see if we can apply it to our sense of self worth.
    5. 5. WHAT’S OUR CURRENCY AS SINGAPOREANS Singapore needs 6.9 million people by 2030? Because we are too picky about jobs? Or less talented than foreign imports?Are we just a faceless statistic to our government?
    6. 6. WHAT’S OUR CURRENCY AS SINGAPOREANSOne Singaporean worker costs as much as 3 … in Malaysia 8 … in Thailand 13 … in China 18 … in India.‖ Source: The Straits Times/08.18.2003
    7. 7. WHAT’S OUR CURRENCY AS SINGAPOREANS MEDIOCRITY: Can do good enough for most Straits Times, 13th Feb 2001ARE Singaporeans at large of a middling quality, justmuddling on blithely with life? Sadly, yes. Most of thepeople polled yesterday agreed that standards here are not glaringly good or bad, but, well, okay, acceptable or just insipidly second-rate...
    8. 8. WHAT’S OUR CURRENCY AS SINGAPOREANS We are not good enough. We are not cheap enough.That’s why we need more foreign talent & labor?
    9. 9. WHAT’S OUR CURRENCY AS SINGAPOREANS From cost-fixation to value-driven?DO WE COMPETE WITH WAL*MART ON PRICE OR CHINA ON COST?
    10. 10. WHY WE NEED TO REDESIGNING OUR SOCIAL CURRENCY“It is not the strongest of thespecies that survives, nor the mostintelligent, but the one mostresponsive to change.” —Charles Darwin
    11. 11. EXAMPLE OF DESIGNING SOCIAL CURRENCY FOR A NATION AND PEOPLE Bangkok Fashion City: raising brand value of Thai textiles by demonstrating the Thai’s flair and design excellence) http://www.fibre2fashion.com/news/fashion-news/newsdetails.aspx?news_id=115181
    12. 12. EXAMPLE OF DESIGNING SOCIAL CURRENCY FOR A NATION AND PEOPLEBetter ByDesign: NZNationalStrategyhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSL3_QKBxLI
    13. 13. EXAMPLE OF DESIGNING SOCIAL CURRENCY FOR A NATION AND PEOPLESince 2005 to 2012, Rob Fyfe droveinnovation, creativity and change as part of Air NewZealand - the passion and commitment to keepmaking things fresh and new in the context of NewZealandness or a spirit that Air NZ knew NZ and itspeople from the ethos of NZ better than anyoneelse:(Key part from 01:00 to 03:35)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MO47FMORuOk
    14. 14. EXAMPLE OF DESIGNING SOCIAL CURRENCY FOR A NATION AND PEOPLEEverything about Air NZ demonstrates thiswillingness to try things out - from the Grab-A-Seatwebsite launched by Fyfe, to the Cuddle Classeconomy flatbed seating introduced last year, thefun and famous Safety videos on board flights tothe All Black planes appearing across the network:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgpYtJMQQjcA truly KIWI way of selling economy spaceseats:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZLBY3lYtsQ
    15. 15. How brands create socialcurrency via emotion designAnd how it applies to individuals and professionals
    16. 16. EMOTION DESIGN CREATES SOCIAL CURRENCYTO OVER-ADVERTISED BRANDS OR PRODUCTSOnce a product is known for beingreliable, functional and usable, what’s next? Brands need to inject or create social/emotional relevance into such experiences to create brand advocates and drive word-of-mouth.
    17. 17. UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONAL DESIGN―… emotional campaigns are almost twiceas likely to generate large profit gains thanrational ones, with campaigns that use factsas well as emotions in equal measure fallsomewhere between the two….
    18. 18. UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONAL DESIGN―Wieden & Kennedy Londons campaign for Hondafrom 2002 to 2004 helped transform the profitability ofthe U.K. business. The most important TV commercialin the campaign, "Cogs," showed parts of the carinteracting in a cleverly choreographed domino-effectsequence.It proved so intriguing to consumers that thecommercial was downloaded 2.3 million times fromthe website and generated huge amounts of onlinebuzz. More important, it generated �390 million inextra revenue through a combination of a 28% volumeuplift and a significant improvement in showroomsales prices: Dealers found they did not need todiscount Honda vehicles so heavily to sell them.‖
    19. 19. UNDERSTANDING EMOTION DESIGNConsulting company VivaldiPartners defined socialcurrency as the extent to whichpeople share the brand orinformation about the brand aspart of their everyday sociallives at work or at home. Thissharing helps companies tocreate unique brand identitiesand earn permission to interactwith consumers or customers.
    20. 20. UNDERSTANDING EMOTION DESIGNCreating social currency movessocial initiatives and campaignsbeyond marketing and PR tochanging entire industries andcategories. Consumers andcustomers will benefit as well asthey increasingly participate insocial platforms, and use socialtechnologies.
    21. 21. UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONAL DESIGN: RED BULL STRATOS"I know the whole world iswatching now," said FelixBaumgartner, at the edge ofspace. Red Bull Stratos setviewing records and markedanother giant leap for abrand setting the standardfor content marketing:www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHtvDA0W34I
    22. 22. UNDERSTANDING EMOTION DESIGN: EARTH HOURPeople want to make a positivedifference but often feel that anythingthey do as individuals won’t matter.When hundreds of millions ofindividuals band together, their actioncan inspire real change.
    23. 23. Understanding emotion design: Basic principle Brands and people need to stand forsomething or they mean nothing online.―…Owning a Prius was an expression of political identity, a way to signal a deeply held belief and a profoundly social act. The quiet satisfaction ofbeing environmentally responsible isnt enough for most of us. We want the world to know were doing it, and our actions to feel like theyre part of a bigger, coordinated movement...‖
    24. 24. CREATING EMOTION DESIGN: BASIC PRINCIPLEhttp://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action.html
    25. 25. UNDERSTANDING EMOTION DESIGN "I help a man to be sent to the moon." Janitor, NASA SOCIAL CURRENCY BRAND ADVOCACY
    26. 26. UNDERSTANDING EMOTION DESIGN ―So Others May Live‖ – Coast Guard Rescue Swimmers SOCIAL CURRENCY IS EMOTIVE
    27. 27. EMOTION DESIGN AT WORK: SOCIAL MEDIA MOVEMENTS Campaign introduction: Campaign introduction: Campaign introduction:http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XNDA1NjA5ODU2.html http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/bw/2009- http://www.damndigital.com/archives/74205 11/16/content_8975024.htm Intangible Cultural Spare Space, Spread LoveEco-operator challenge Heritage Protection Project --Johnson & Johnson(China)-- --Volvo Construction --Canon (China)-- Equipment-- 1 2 3
    28. 28. EMOTION DESIGN AT WORK FOR INDIVIDUALS Apple’s Retail Army, Long on Loyalty but Short on Pay―Enriching people’s lives.‖: The idea is to instill in employees the notion that they are doing something far grander than just selling or fixing products. If there is a secret to Apple’s sauce, this is it: the companyennobles employees. It understands that people will forgo money if they have a sense of higher purpose.
    29. 29. EMOTION DESIGN AT WORK FOR INDIVIDUALS United Break Guitar: http://youtu.be/5YGc4zOqozo
    30. 30. EMOTION DESIGN AT WORK FOR INDIVIDUALS Dove Gifting’s Chinese Valentine’s Campaign: http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMzAzNzc5NzQw.htmlThanks to the passion of lovers to find online inspiration for Valentine’s Day, an artist was able to bring a once-in-a-lifetime project to life.
    31. 31. CREATING YOUR SOCIAL CURRENCY AROUND EMOTION DESIGNTry out these key principles in your everyday life:1] Showcase to the world your beliefs and what you are best at.2] Sell with emotion what you are, what you excel and suck at.3] Bring people together if they share your emotions or beliefs.4] Bring them closer if their strengths complement your weaknesses. By Kestrel Lee http://sg.linkedin.com/in/kestrellee

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