Alluriarniq Stepping Forward:
Youth Perspectives on Education
in Nunavut
1)University of Prince Edward Island, Charlotteto...
Partners & Research Team
Fiona
Walton
Sandy
McAuley
Kerri
Wheatley
Mark
Sandiford
Rebecca
Mearns
Naullaq
Arnaquq
Heather
M...
National Strategy on Inuit Education
2011
Too many of our children are not
attending school, too few are
graduating, and e...
Education in Nunavut
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
GraduationRate(%)
Graduation Rates 1999-2011
Nunavut Average
0
20
40
60
8...
Responsive Research
IQ and the
Transformation of
High School
Education in Nunavut
Statistical Case
Studies
Inuit Principal...
Research Locations
Pangnirtung
Kugluktu
k
Rankin Inlet
Participants
PS inPangnirtunKugluktu Rankin Inlet
Findings
Culture, language
and academic
programs
Family support
Student
engagement
Caring and effective
teachers
Post-seco...
Video Not Available
Alluriarniq Stepping Forward
Stories and
Findings
Practi
ce
Policy
Research
Thank You
Full documentary in English or Inuktitut:
http://nunavut.upei.ca/content/alluriarniq-stepping-
forward
YouTube: ...
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ArcticNet Scientific Meeting: Dr. Fiona Walton Plenary 2012

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Dr Fiona Walton from the University of Prince Edward Island presents ArcticNet funded research on Youth Perspectives on High school Education in Nunavut

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  • DEA- Represent every community with a school in NunavutKerri- Project ManagerMark-Film makerBecky- Bilingual NarratorNaullaq- HeatherWe are committed to helping build capacity of Inuit researchers, also worked closely with In-community researchers and support.
  • This is a very important time for Inuit Education in Canada. In bringing government, educational juristrctions and Inuit organizations together, from across the four Inuit regions, ITK has formed a national committee working towards implementing changes in education outline in the National strategy.
  • When researching on High school education in Nunavut, the first thing we are confronted with are the statistics. Graduation: 1. Nunavut Graduation rates remain the lowest in Canada for Aboriginalstudents. Current graduation rates hoverbetween2. In recent years, some positive change is taking place, the percentage of students graduating has increased. Attendance: However, attendance rates are very low. Kindergarten attendance rates are 80%, to put that into perspective that means a child misses one day of class each and every week. Overall attendance in 2010-2011 (across all grades, all regions) = 70.3%This is very important to note. By the time a student reaches grade 12, they would have missed 3 years of class (due to cumulative absence through the years)
  • -The current research is based on a larger 4 year study of high school education in Nunavut.-Goal of research is to identify practices, strategies and actions, that contribute to improvements in educational outcomes of high school students in Nunavut -10-year historical and statistical Case studies of high schools in Pangnirtung, Clyde River, Rankin Inlet, and Kugluktuk-First phase of project the focus was on how Inuit principals in Pang and Clyde changed the conditions of a school, to foster student success. -The next phase of the project, the current research we shifted focus to respond to a key priority of our partner. Nunavut DEA coalition members were so pleased with the first bilingual documentary video we released and but wanted to know, “What are the young people saying about education?”
  • The research team travelled to 3 Nunavut communities, where we strong in-community support from UPEI master of Education graduates and students. Including Adriana Kusugak who was our in commmunity support person in Rankin.-Pang in the Baffin Region (Qikitani) -Rankin Inlet in the Kivalliq-Kugluktuk in the Kitikmeot
  • Interviewed 12 women and 7 men from across the territory.-Aged between 17-25-Educational backgrounds ranging from still in HS or left HS without completing, up through to some university
  • Strong culture, language & academic programs: The need for strong language programs to help keep the language vibrant, strong cultural programs to help students learn skills necessary to survive on the land, Strong academic programs to prepare students for post secondary educationFamily Support: Young people express the importance that Grandparents and parents have on education. Family need to work to support students academically.Student engagement: Peers can have an impact on student’s experiences in high school. Young people may feel that peers disengagement from school may have held them back. Caring and effective teachers: Teachers who care about students both academically and PERSONALLY, can make a difference for students. Teachers can motivate young people to stay in school..Post secondary: Participants who had attended post secondary expressed the shock they experienced, and how they felt high school had left them unprepared academically. TheirryRodan has been working specifiically on access to post-secondary educationHope for change: While young people expressed both their struggles and successes, they remained confident that education can and will change for the future of generations of Nunavut.
  • The title of the current research is “Stepping Forward”. _Strong young people in Nunavut have stepped forward to openly and honestly share their experiences.-They have told their stories in the hopes that someone will Listen and will Learn. -It is now up to us, to translate these stories into actions- To step forward together to find solutions and work towards continuing to improve education.
  • ArcticNet Scientific Meeting: Dr. Fiona Walton Plenary 2012

    1. 1. Alluriarniq Stepping Forward: Youth Perspectives on Education in Nunavut 1)University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Canada; 2) Beachwalker Films, Charlottetown, Canada; 3) University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. 4) Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. Fiona Walton1 A. McAuley1, K. Wheatley1, D. O’Leary1 , M. Sandiford2, H. McGregor3, R. Mearns4
    2. 2. Partners & Research Team Fiona Walton Sandy McAuley Kerri Wheatley Mark Sandiford Rebecca Mearns Naullaq Arnaquq Heather McGregor
    3. 3. National Strategy on Inuit Education 2011 Too many of our children are not attending school, too few are graduating, and even some of our graduates are not equipped with an education that fully meets the Canadian standard. This is the greatest social policy challenge of our time. Some 56% of our population is under the age of 25, so improving educational outcomes is imperative. -Mary Simon
    4. 4. Education in Nunavut 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 GraduationRate(%) Graduation Rates 1999-2011 Nunavut Average 0 20 40 60 80 100 Attendance(%) Attendance Rates by Grade (2001/02 through 2010/11 school years)
    5. 5. Responsive Research IQ and the Transformation of High School Education in Nunavut Statistical Case Studies Inuit Principals and Leadership Youth PerspectivesPriority of Partner ArcticNet funded Project “Going Places” documentary video Consultation with Nunavut DEA Coalition “Alluriarniq- Stepping Forward” documentary video
    6. 6. Research Locations Pangnirtung Kugluktu k Rankin Inlet
    7. 7. Participants PS inPangnirtunKugluktu Rankin Inlet
    8. 8. Findings Culture, language and academic programs Family support Student engagement Caring and effective teachers Post-secondary education Hope for change
    9. 9. Video Not Available
    10. 10. Alluriarniq Stepping Forward Stories and Findings Practi ce Policy Research
    11. 11. Thank You Full documentary in English or Inuktitut: http://nunavut.upei.ca/content/alluriarniq-stepping- forward YouTube: Stepping Forward-English ISUMA TV: Alluriarniq- Stepping Forward All photos by Kerri Wheatley and Mark Sandiford

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