SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 55
Download to read offline
Kanban or Scrum?
Scrum in a nutshell
Form a team
Collect work
Prioritize work
Pick up some of the work
Do this work in a Sprint
Show what you did
Reflect on how well you did
Form a Team
• Product Owner
– The voice of the customer
– If you need several Product Owners, you need
several Scrum Teams
• Scrum Master
– Removes impediments
– (Not really a Project Manager)
– (Not necessarily a full-time job)
– (Not necessarily a permanent role)
• Scrum Team
– People who can Pull; don’t need work Pushed to
them
Collect Work
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
Product Backlog:
prioritized
Story: something that
needs to be done, that
can be done in a Sprint
Highest priority Story
Lowest priority Story
“As a small business owner, I
want a single place to file all
my quarterly reports,
so I don’t have to deal with
multiple agencies.”
Write a Good Story
“As a …,
I want to …
so that I can …”
Who?
What?
Why?
(But not how)
Define “Done”
• Agree, up-front, what Done means for each Story
– Define acceptance criteria for the Story
– Include as part of the Story
– Agree on this before starting work
• Use this definition during Show & Tell at Sprint’s
End
– Team formally demonstrates that acceptance
criteria have been met
– Product Owner accepts Story as Done.
– If more/different work is required after story
has been accepted, that’s a new story
Epics & Stories
Can it be
done in
a Sprint?
You have a
story
Break it down into
more stories
Yes
No
Epics, Stories, Tasks
Story 1-1
Story 1-2
Story 1-3
Story 2-1
Story 2-2
Story 2-3
Epic 1
Epic 2
Task 1-1-1
Task 1-1-2
Task 1-1-3
Example
Epic: create a mobile-friendly version of the
OFM agency website
• Story 1: “As a citizen, I want to be able to
look up salaries from my phone”
• Story 2: “As an employee, I want to be able
to access HR docs from my phone”
Task 2-1: Reformat the Sick Leave page
Plan Work
• Estimate relative complexity using story
points
Story Points ≠ Hours or Days
• Complexity has a non-linear impact
2x as hard? More than 2x as long
• Fibonacci Series helps
1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21
Try to Fail Fast
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
Story
Product Backlog:
Prioritized by
difficulty
Try to do the hardest,
riskiest work first.
If project is going to fail
because the work is too
hard to do, it’s better to
learn early than late.
Hardest work first
Easy work is lower priority
Organize a Sprint
• Prep: Groom the Backlog
– Product Owner does this
• Start: Sprint Planning
– Pick a doable set of prioritized stories
• Work: Daily Standups
– Track progress with burndown
• Deliver: Sprint Ends
– Only completed stories are Done
• Reflect: Sprint Retrospective
– How did we do?
Play Planning Poker
A way for a team to collectively estimate complexity
• Each team member has cards numbered 1, 2, 3, 5…
• After a Story is reviewed, everyone simultaneously holds up a card
with their personal estimate of the Story’s complexity (Story Points)
– This is needed to get a wisdom of crowds estimate, where
each estimate is independent
• If estimates are widely divergent, team members are asked to justify
their outliers:
– Why did you think it is just 1 point?
– And why did you think it is 8 points?
• After discussion, people bid again: the estimates should start
converging, as people’s understanding of the work converges.
– Repeat until estimates converge to a single number; use that
number.
Commit just enough
• Velocity is used to help the Scrum Team pick a
suitable number of Stories for the next Sprint
– Velocity is average number of Story Points
delivered by the Team in previous Sprints
• Commit as close to velocity as possible, without
going over
Example: Velocity is 20 points; commit to 19
points rather than 21.
– If Team finishes before Sprint ends, pick up
more Stories as stretch goals.
How long is a Sprint?
Depends…
• 1 week is short
• 1 month is long
• 2 weeks is usually good
You need to be able to do at least 1+ stories in one
Sprint
You need consistency across Sprints
• Duration doesn’t change based upon complexity of
work in a particular Sprint
• Break the stories down to fit into a Sprint, not the
other way around…
Ideal Sprints
Story 1
Story 2
Story 3
Story 4
Story 5
Story 6
Story 7
Story 8
Product Backlog
Story 1
Story 2
Story 3
Sprint 1
Story 4
Story 5
Story 6
Sprint 2
Story 1
Story 2
Story 3
Done
Story 7
Story 8
Sprint 3
Story 4
Story 5
Story 6
Story 7
Story 8
Real-life Sprints
Story 1
Story 2
Story 3
Story 4
Story 5
Story 6
Product Backlog
Story 1
Story 2
Story 3
Sprint 1
Story 4
Story 5
Story 5
Sprint 2
Story 1
Story 2
Story 3
Done
Story 6
Sprint 3
Story 4
Story 5
Story 6
Story 3Story 3
Story 5
Abandoning Stories
Story 1
Story 2
Story 3
Story 4
Story 5
Story 6
Product Backlog
Story 1
Story 2
Story 3
Sprint 1
Story 6
Story 6
Sprint 2
Story 1
Story 2
Story 4
Done
Sprint 3
Story 5
Story 6
Story 6
Story 4
Story 5
Time-sensitive story didn’t
make it; gets abandoned
Epics Across Sprints
Sprint 1 Sprint 2
Story 1 Story 2 Story 3
Sprint 3
Story 4 Story 5 Story 6 Story 7 Story 8
Epic 1 Epic 2
Run the Sprint
• Protect the team
– No new commitments
• Measure output
– Use Burndown Chart for early warning
• Show & Tell
– Product Owner must accept what’s Done
• End Sprint
– Use Retrospective to reflect
– Calculate Velocity of the team
The Nuclear Option
Daily Standups: Old School
In 2 minutes each, each person tells the team:
• What did I get done, since yesterday?
• What do I plan to do today?
• What is blocking me?
Scrum Master:
• Remove impediments
• Update Burndown
• Not a Project Manager
• Not a full-time job
Daily Standups: Kerika Style
Standups are not needed simply for the team to
catch up on what everyone else is doing: Kerika will
provide updates in real-time.
Standup are not needed to identify impediments;
these can be flagged in real-time.
Instead, use the Daily Standup to address the most
difficult problems, and answer the most strategic
questions
• Where individual action isn’t enough, and
collective problem solving is needed
Makes the Daily Standup worth attending!
Product Owner Stays Involved
Product Owners shouldn’t just appear at the Sprint
Planning and Sprint Retrospectives; they should
participate in the Daily Standups.
As team works through stories, questions will
arise; decisions will need to be taken.
• Product Owner can help remove external
impediments
• Product Owner shouldn’t expand scope of work,
but can help narrow scope when needed
Burndown
Story
Points
remaining
Days remaining in Sprint
Theory
Reality
Stressful slow start
Panicky despair
Unwarranted euphoria
Velocity
• Capacity of team, measured as historical average
of Story Points delivered in past 3 Sprints
• Useful for planning future Sprints
– Guide to capacity of current team
– Not known at the beginning
– Measures perceived complexity of work; not
competence or productivity of Team
• Will flatline eventually
– Stable team, consistent Sprints
Scrum Retrospectives
• What worked, what didn’t
– Were stories clear?
– Was Product Owner supportive?
– Was Scrum Master helpful?
• Did velocity change?
– Why?
Getting Scrum Right
• Deal with distributed teams
– Fluid collaboration networks
– Instant situational awareness
• Deal with differences in skills
– Specialists often to work on multiple projects at same time.
• Deal with scale
– Many, many cards. Many, many boards.
• Deal with chores and defects
– Treat them like stories
• Have a sprint theme
– Avoid picking a random set of stories for a Sprint
• Avoid velocity inflation
Where Scrum Works Best
• Work is new
– Strategy, tactics are uncertain
• Environment is fluid
– Requirements / market / policy uncertainty
– New partnerships are being tried
• Process improvement is rhythmic
– Re-prioritize work episodically
• Examples:
– Any & all software development
Scrum in Government
• Need regulatory flexibility in purchasing
– Buying Agile services
– Trying SaaS technology
• Need budget flexibility in planning
– Cannot realistic budget for everything that a
Scrum project needs
• Need organizational flexibility in career paths
– Without traditional Project Managers,
promotion paths need to evolve
– Rewards team contribution, more than
individual achievement?
Getting Kanban Right
• Deal with distributed teams
– Fluid collaboration networks
– Awareness with emails
• Integrate Tasks + Content + Conversations
– Critical elements of system
• Manage capacity with Work-in-Process Limits
– Personal Kanban: WIP for today
– Team Kanban: WIP for function in workflow
• Optimize for smooth flows
– Avoid rework, waste
Where Kanban Works Best
• Work flows in continuously
– Similar size and shape
– Can be done by anyone
– Is re-prioritized very frequently
• Work is well understood
– You are not inventing (much)
• Examples:
– Case Management, Help Desk
Collaboration Networks
(You are here)
Try Technology
Example: Personal Kanban
What’s currently on Melissa’s plate, and why your request is waiting…
Example: Team Kanban
More complex workflows, and smart highlights on what’s changed
Example: Agency
Public sector example of Kanban with a distributed team
Example: Marketing Scrum
Two Scrum boards, representing different Sprints, that access the same Backlog
Stories
The crucial details that won’t fit onto a Post It
Tasks
Track all the Tasks needed to complete a Story
Content
The files and Web stuff you consume and produce for the Story
Conversations
Chat about the Story, on the Story itself
People
Identify who’s working on a Story, right now
Tags
Help link together related cards, like all the Stories that came from same Epic
Situational Awareness
What happened while you were away
Pivoting Your View
See work from a time perspective, an alternative to workflow view
At Scale
Smart highlights to zoom in on what matters most to you
Across Projects
Summary views of everything that’s happening, across all your Kerika boards, right now.
What’s Assigned to Me?
Across every board: what’s expected of you, right now?
What Needs Attention?
What Got Done?
Your status report, automated
Summary
• You need technology to scale
– Paper doesn’t scale
• Be pragmatic, not dogmatic
– The perfect team doesn’t exist
• Remember to reflect, improve
– Every Sprint
• Get buy-in, get support
– Management, policy, technology
As with any religion, you need to understand the
philosophy before you follow the rituals
Questions?
Arun@Kerika.com

More Related Content

What's hot

Agile & SCRUM basics
Agile & SCRUM basicsAgile & SCRUM basics
Agile & SCRUM basicsArun R
 
Scrum to Scrumban Migration
Scrum to Scrumban MigrationScrum to Scrumban Migration
Scrum to Scrumban MigrationSkills Matter
 
Kanban introduction
Kanban introductionKanban introduction
Kanban introductionAhmed Hammad
 
Intro to Kanban - AgileDayChile2011 Keynote
Intro to Kanban - AgileDayChile2011 KeynoteIntro to Kanban - AgileDayChile2011 Keynote
Intro to Kanban - AgileDayChile2011 KeynoteChileAgil
 
Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability - Daniel Vacanti
Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability - Daniel VacantiActionable Agile Metrics for Predictability - Daniel Vacanti
Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability - Daniel VacantiAgile Montréal
 
Agile Scrum Training, Day 1 (1/2)
Agile Scrum Training, Day 1 (1/2)Agile Scrum Training, Day 1 (1/2)
Agile Scrum Training, Day 1 (1/2)Jens Wilke
 
Introduction agile scrum methodology
Introduction agile scrum methodologyIntroduction agile scrum methodology
Introduction agile scrum methodologyAmit Verma
 
Kanban board 9th may 2017
Kanban board   9th may 2017Kanban board   9th may 2017
Kanban board 9th may 2017gagann78
 
Scrum vs Kanban - Which Agile Methodology Fits Best For Your Team?
Scrum vs Kanban - Which Agile Methodology Fits Best For Your Team?Scrum vs Kanban - Which Agile Methodology Fits Best For Your Team?
Scrum vs Kanban - Which Agile Methodology Fits Best For Your Team?Invensis Learning
 
Statik, Kanban's hidden gem
Statik, Kanban's hidden gemStatik, Kanban's hidden gem
Statik, Kanban's hidden gemMike Burrows
 
Introduction to Agile - Scrum, Kanban, and everything in between
Introduction to Agile - Scrum, Kanban, and everything in betweenIntroduction to Agile - Scrum, Kanban, and everything in between
Introduction to Agile - Scrum, Kanban, and everything in betweenPravin Kumar Singh, PMP, PSM
 

What's hot (20)

Agile & SCRUM basics
Agile & SCRUM basicsAgile & SCRUM basics
Agile & SCRUM basics
 
Scrumban
ScrumbanScrumban
Scrumban
 
Scrum to Scrumban Migration
Scrum to Scrumban MigrationScrum to Scrumban Migration
Scrum to Scrumban Migration
 
Lets kanban
Lets kanbanLets kanban
Lets kanban
 
Introduction to Kanban
Introduction to KanbanIntroduction to Kanban
Introduction to Kanban
 
Scrum vs kanban
Scrum vs kanbanScrum vs kanban
Scrum vs kanban
 
What Is Agile Scrum
What Is Agile ScrumWhat Is Agile Scrum
What Is Agile Scrum
 
Kanban introduction
Kanban introductionKanban introduction
Kanban introduction
 
Intro to Kanban - AgileDayChile2011 Keynote
Intro to Kanban - AgileDayChile2011 KeynoteIntro to Kanban - AgileDayChile2011 Keynote
Intro to Kanban - AgileDayChile2011 Keynote
 
Scrumban
ScrumbanScrumban
Scrumban
 
2017 Scrum by Picture
2017 Scrum by Picture2017 Scrum by Picture
2017 Scrum by Picture
 
Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability - Daniel Vacanti
Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability - Daniel VacantiActionable Agile Metrics for Predictability - Daniel Vacanti
Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability - Daniel Vacanti
 
Agile (Scrum)
Agile (Scrum)Agile (Scrum)
Agile (Scrum)
 
Agile Scrum Training, Day 1 (1/2)
Agile Scrum Training, Day 1 (1/2)Agile Scrum Training, Day 1 (1/2)
Agile Scrum Training, Day 1 (1/2)
 
Introduction agile scrum methodology
Introduction agile scrum methodologyIntroduction agile scrum methodology
Introduction agile scrum methodology
 
Agile 101
Agile 101Agile 101
Agile 101
 
Kanban board 9th may 2017
Kanban board   9th may 2017Kanban board   9th may 2017
Kanban board 9th may 2017
 
Scrum vs Kanban - Which Agile Methodology Fits Best For Your Team?
Scrum vs Kanban - Which Agile Methodology Fits Best For Your Team?Scrum vs Kanban - Which Agile Methodology Fits Best For Your Team?
Scrum vs Kanban - Which Agile Methodology Fits Best For Your Team?
 
Statik, Kanban's hidden gem
Statik, Kanban's hidden gemStatik, Kanban's hidden gem
Statik, Kanban's hidden gem
 
Introduction to Agile - Scrum, Kanban, and everything in between
Introduction to Agile - Scrum, Kanban, and everything in betweenIntroduction to Agile - Scrum, Kanban, and everything in between
Introduction to Agile - Scrum, Kanban, and everything in between
 

Similar to Kanban vs Scrum: What's the difference, and which should you use?

The power to Say NO - Using Scrum in a BAU Team
The power to Say NO - Using Scrum in a BAU TeamThe power to Say NO - Using Scrum in a BAU Team
The power to Say NO - Using Scrum in a BAU TeamMia Horrigan
 
ACS Presentation : How to teach your team Agile in 3 months
ACS Presentation : How to teach your team Agile in 3 monthsACS Presentation : How to teach your team Agile in 3 months
ACS Presentation : How to teach your team Agile in 3 monthsMia Horrigan
 
Agile.pptx
Agile.pptxAgile.pptx
Agile.pptxRafeeq T
 
Scrum - What is it good for?
Scrum - What is it good for?Scrum - What is it good for?
Scrum - What is it good for?Diana Minnée
 
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 01 intro & backlog
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 01 intro & backlogScrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 01 intro & backlog
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 01 intro & backlogHossam Hassan
 
Xanpan extended presentation
Xanpan extended presentationXanpan extended presentation
Xanpan extended presentationallan kelly
 
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 02 sprint planning
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 02 sprint planningScrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 02 sprint planning
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 02 sprint planningHossam Hassan
 
Sdec11.agile ina day
Sdec11.agile ina daySdec11.agile ina day
Sdec11.agile ina daysdeconf
 
Agile – scrum +
Agile – scrum +Agile – scrum +
Agile – scrum +Alon Lahav
 
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 03 sprint backlog & daily scrum
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 03 sprint backlog & daily scrumScrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 03 sprint backlog & daily scrum
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 03 sprint backlog & daily scrumHossam Hassan
 
Story Mapping Made Real - 2h
Story Mapping Made Real - 2hStory Mapping Made Real - 2h
Story Mapping Made Real - 2hDaniel Davis
 
Mujeebur rahmansaher introduction-to-scrum_v2
Mujeebur rahmansaher introduction-to-scrum_v2Mujeebur rahmansaher introduction-to-scrum_v2
Mujeebur rahmansaher introduction-to-scrum_v2Mujeebur Rahmansaher
 
Climbing out of a Crisis Loop at the BBC
Climbing out of a Crisis Loop at the BBCClimbing out of a Crisis Loop at the BBC
Climbing out of a Crisis Loop at the BBCRafiq Gemmail
 
Agile projetcs (sizing and estimation)
Agile projetcs (sizing and estimation)Agile projetcs (sizing and estimation)
Agile projetcs (sizing and estimation)XPDays
 
Agile Scrum Quick Reference Card
Agile Scrum Quick Reference CardAgile Scrum Quick Reference Card
Agile Scrum Quick Reference CardTechcanvass
 

Similar to Kanban vs Scrum: What's the difference, and which should you use? (20)

The power to Say NO - Using Scrum in a BAU Team
The power to Say NO - Using Scrum in a BAU TeamThe power to Say NO - Using Scrum in a BAU Team
The power to Say NO - Using Scrum in a BAU Team
 
ACS Presentation : How to teach your team Agile in 3 months
ACS Presentation : How to teach your team Agile in 3 monthsACS Presentation : How to teach your team Agile in 3 months
ACS Presentation : How to teach your team Agile in 3 months
 
Agile.pptx
Agile.pptxAgile.pptx
Agile.pptx
 
What is scrum
What is scrumWhat is scrum
What is scrum
 
Agile Scrum Estimation
Agile   Scrum EstimationAgile   Scrum Estimation
Agile Scrum Estimation
 
Scrum - What is it good for?
Scrum - What is it good for?Scrum - What is it good for?
Scrum - What is it good for?
 
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 01 intro & backlog
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 01 intro & backlogScrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 01 intro & backlog
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 01 intro & backlog
 
Xanpan extended presentation
Xanpan extended presentationXanpan extended presentation
Xanpan extended presentation
 
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 02 sprint planning
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 02 sprint planningScrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 02 sprint planning
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 02 sprint planning
 
NoEstimates@iNatuix
NoEstimates@iNatuixNoEstimates@iNatuix
NoEstimates@iNatuix
 
Sdec11.agile ina day
Sdec11.agile ina daySdec11.agile ina day
Sdec11.agile ina day
 
SCRUM Intro
SCRUM IntroSCRUM Intro
SCRUM Intro
 
Agile – scrum +
Agile – scrum +Agile – scrum +
Agile – scrum +
 
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 03 sprint backlog & daily scrum
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 03 sprint backlog & daily scrumScrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 03 sprint backlog & daily scrum
Scrum and-xp-from-the-trenches 03 sprint backlog & daily scrum
 
Story Mapping Made Real - 2h
Story Mapping Made Real - 2hStory Mapping Made Real - 2h
Story Mapping Made Real - 2h
 
Mujeebur rahmansaher introduction-to-scrum_v2
Mujeebur rahmansaher introduction-to-scrum_v2Mujeebur rahmansaher introduction-to-scrum_v2
Mujeebur rahmansaher introduction-to-scrum_v2
 
Agile scrum
Agile   scrumAgile   scrum
Agile scrum
 
Climbing out of a Crisis Loop at the BBC
Climbing out of a Crisis Loop at the BBCClimbing out of a Crisis Loop at the BBC
Climbing out of a Crisis Loop at the BBC
 
Agile projetcs (sizing and estimation)
Agile projetcs (sizing and estimation)Agile projetcs (sizing and estimation)
Agile projetcs (sizing and estimation)
 
Agile Scrum Quick Reference Card
Agile Scrum Quick Reference CardAgile Scrum Quick Reference Card
Agile Scrum Quick Reference Card
 

More from Arun Kumar

Collaboration across boundaries
Collaboration across boundariesCollaboration across boundaries
Collaboration across boundariesArun Kumar
 
Can you see it now? visualizing your lean and agile processes
Can you see it now? visualizing your lean and agile processesCan you see it now? visualizing your lean and agile processes
Can you see it now? visualizing your lean and agile processesArun Kumar
 
Agile QA report for the State of Washington
Agile QA report for the State of WashingtonAgile QA report for the State of Washington
Agile QA report for the State of WashingtonArun Kumar
 
Lean & Agile Government in Washington State
Lean & Agile Government in Washington StateLean & Agile Government in Washington State
Lean & Agile Government in Washington StateArun Kumar
 
Kanban in a Can: Capture, Visualize and Optimize your Everyday Processes
Kanban in a Can: Capture, Visualize and Optimize your Everyday ProcessesKanban in a Can: Capture, Visualize and Optimize your Everyday Processes
Kanban in a Can: Capture, Visualize and Optimize your Everyday ProcessesArun Kumar
 
Distributed Lean & Agile Teams in the Public Sector: Lessons Learned
Distributed Lean & Agile Teams in the Public Sector: Lessons LearnedDistributed Lean & Agile Teams in the Public Sector: Lessons Learned
Distributed Lean & Agile Teams in the Public Sector: Lessons LearnedArun Kumar
 
When worlds collide: distributed agile in the public sector
When worlds collide: distributed agile in the public sectorWhen worlds collide: distributed agile in the public sector
When worlds collide: distributed agile in the public sectorArun Kumar
 
Using Kerika for Washington State government work
Using Kerika for Washington State government workUsing Kerika for Washington State government work
Using Kerika for Washington State government workArun Kumar
 
How a state agency became Lean, thanks to Kerika
How a state agency became Lean, thanks to KerikaHow a state agency became Lean, thanks to Kerika
How a state agency became Lean, thanks to KerikaArun Kumar
 
Kerika: A Case Study of a Project Management Office at Treinen Associates
Kerika: A Case Study of a Project Management Office at Treinen AssociatesKerika: A Case Study of a Project Management Office at Treinen Associates
Kerika: A Case Study of a Project Management Office at Treinen AssociatesArun Kumar
 
Here be dragons
Here be dragonsHere be dragons
Here be dragonsArun Kumar
 
Kerika datasheet
Kerika datasheetKerika datasheet
Kerika datasheetArun Kumar
 
An introduction to Kerika
An introduction to KerikaAn introduction to Kerika
An introduction to KerikaArun Kumar
 

More from Arun Kumar (13)

Collaboration across boundaries
Collaboration across boundariesCollaboration across boundaries
Collaboration across boundaries
 
Can you see it now? visualizing your lean and agile processes
Can you see it now? visualizing your lean and agile processesCan you see it now? visualizing your lean and agile processes
Can you see it now? visualizing your lean and agile processes
 
Agile QA report for the State of Washington
Agile QA report for the State of WashingtonAgile QA report for the State of Washington
Agile QA report for the State of Washington
 
Lean & Agile Government in Washington State
Lean & Agile Government in Washington StateLean & Agile Government in Washington State
Lean & Agile Government in Washington State
 
Kanban in a Can: Capture, Visualize and Optimize your Everyday Processes
Kanban in a Can: Capture, Visualize and Optimize your Everyday ProcessesKanban in a Can: Capture, Visualize and Optimize your Everyday Processes
Kanban in a Can: Capture, Visualize and Optimize your Everyday Processes
 
Distributed Lean & Agile Teams in the Public Sector: Lessons Learned
Distributed Lean & Agile Teams in the Public Sector: Lessons LearnedDistributed Lean & Agile Teams in the Public Sector: Lessons Learned
Distributed Lean & Agile Teams in the Public Sector: Lessons Learned
 
When worlds collide: distributed agile in the public sector
When worlds collide: distributed agile in the public sectorWhen worlds collide: distributed agile in the public sector
When worlds collide: distributed agile in the public sector
 
Using Kerika for Washington State government work
Using Kerika for Washington State government workUsing Kerika for Washington State government work
Using Kerika for Washington State government work
 
How a state agency became Lean, thanks to Kerika
How a state agency became Lean, thanks to KerikaHow a state agency became Lean, thanks to Kerika
How a state agency became Lean, thanks to Kerika
 
Kerika: A Case Study of a Project Management Office at Treinen Associates
Kerika: A Case Study of a Project Management Office at Treinen AssociatesKerika: A Case Study of a Project Management Office at Treinen Associates
Kerika: A Case Study of a Project Management Office at Treinen Associates
 
Here be dragons
Here be dragonsHere be dragons
Here be dragons
 
Kerika datasheet
Kerika datasheetKerika datasheet
Kerika datasheet
 
An introduction to Kerika
An introduction to KerikaAn introduction to Kerika
An introduction to Kerika
 

Recently uploaded

Digital PR Summit - Leadership Lessons: Myths, Mistakes, & Toxic Traits
Digital PR Summit - Leadership Lessons: Myths, Mistakes, & Toxic TraitsDigital PR Summit - Leadership Lessons: Myths, Mistakes, & Toxic Traits
Digital PR Summit - Leadership Lessons: Myths, Mistakes, & Toxic TraitsHannah Smith
 
Operations Management -- Sustainability and Supply Chain Management.pdf
Operations Management -- Sustainability and Supply Chain Management.pdfOperations Management -- Sustainability and Supply Chain Management.pdf
Operations Management -- Sustainability and Supply Chain Management.pdfcoolsnoopy1
 
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous Improvement
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous ImprovementLeveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous Improvement
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous ImprovementCIToolkit
 
Hajra Karrim: Transformative Leadership Driving Innovation and Efficiency in ...
Hajra Karrim: Transformative Leadership Driving Innovation and Efficiency in ...Hajra Karrim: Transformative Leadership Driving Innovation and Efficiency in ...
Hajra Karrim: Transformative Leadership Driving Innovation and Efficiency in ...dsnow9802
 
Advancing Enterprise Risk Management Practices- A Strategic Framework by Naga...
Advancing Enterprise Risk Management Practices- A Strategic Framework by Naga...Advancing Enterprise Risk Management Practices- A Strategic Framework by Naga...
Advancing Enterprise Risk Management Practices- A Strategic Framework by Naga...Nagarjuna Reddy Aturi
 
Management 11th Edition - Chapter 11 - Adaptive Organizational Design
Management 11th Edition - Chapter 11 - Adaptive Organizational DesignManagement 11th Edition - Chapter 11 - Adaptive Organizational Design
Management 11th Edition - Chapter 11 - Adaptive Organizational Designshakkardaddy
 
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data Insights
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data InsightsThe Role of Histograms in Exploring Data Insights
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data InsightsCIToolkit
 
Adapting to Change: Using PEST Analysis for Better Decision-Making
Adapting to Change: Using PEST Analysis for Better Decision-MakingAdapting to Change: Using PEST Analysis for Better Decision-Making
Adapting to Change: Using PEST Analysis for Better Decision-MakingCIToolkit
 
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of Flowcharts
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of FlowchartsFlowcharting: The Three Common Types of Flowcharts
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of FlowchartsCIToolkit
 
Characteristics of professional in professional ethics
Characteristics of professional in professional ethicsCharacteristics of professional in professional ethics
Characteristics of professional in professional ethicsmourale176
 
Mind Mapping: A Visual Approach to Organize Ideas and Thoughts
Mind Mapping: A Visual Approach to Organize Ideas and ThoughtsMind Mapping: A Visual Approach to Organize Ideas and Thoughts
Mind Mapping: A Visual Approach to Organize Ideas and ThoughtsCIToolkit
 
The Final Activity in Project Management
The Final Activity in Project ManagementThe Final Activity in Project Management
The Final Activity in Project ManagementCIToolkit
 
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & Engineering
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & EngineeringBoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & Engineering
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & EngineeringBusiness of Software Conference
 
How Technologies will change the relationship with Human Resources
How Technologies will change the relationship with Human ResourcesHow Technologies will change the relationship with Human Resources
How Technologies will change the relationship with Human ResourcesMassimo Canducci
 
HOTEL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PPT PRESENTATION
HOTEL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PPT PRESENTATIONHOTEL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PPT PRESENTATION
HOTEL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PPT PRESENTATIONsivani14565220
 
From Red to Green: Enhancing Decision-Making with Traffic Light Assessment
From Red to Green: Enhancing Decision-Making with Traffic Light AssessmentFrom Red to Green: Enhancing Decision-Making with Traffic Light Assessment
From Red to Green: Enhancing Decision-Making with Traffic Light AssessmentCIToolkit
 
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentation
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentationOverview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentation
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentationPMIUKChapter
 
The Role of Box Plots in Comparing Multiple Data Sets
The Role of Box Plots in Comparing Multiple Data SetsThe Role of Box Plots in Comparing Multiple Data Sets
The Role of Box Plots in Comparing Multiple Data SetsCIToolkit
 
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram Analysis
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram AnalysisExploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram Analysis
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram AnalysisCIToolkit
 

Recently uploaded (19)

Digital PR Summit - Leadership Lessons: Myths, Mistakes, & Toxic Traits
Digital PR Summit - Leadership Lessons: Myths, Mistakes, & Toxic TraitsDigital PR Summit - Leadership Lessons: Myths, Mistakes, & Toxic Traits
Digital PR Summit - Leadership Lessons: Myths, Mistakes, & Toxic Traits
 
Operations Management -- Sustainability and Supply Chain Management.pdf
Operations Management -- Sustainability and Supply Chain Management.pdfOperations Management -- Sustainability and Supply Chain Management.pdf
Operations Management -- Sustainability and Supply Chain Management.pdf
 
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous Improvement
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous ImprovementLeveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous Improvement
Leveraging Gap Analysis for Continuous Improvement
 
Hajra Karrim: Transformative Leadership Driving Innovation and Efficiency in ...
Hajra Karrim: Transformative Leadership Driving Innovation and Efficiency in ...Hajra Karrim: Transformative Leadership Driving Innovation and Efficiency in ...
Hajra Karrim: Transformative Leadership Driving Innovation and Efficiency in ...
 
Advancing Enterprise Risk Management Practices- A Strategic Framework by Naga...
Advancing Enterprise Risk Management Practices- A Strategic Framework by Naga...Advancing Enterprise Risk Management Practices- A Strategic Framework by Naga...
Advancing Enterprise Risk Management Practices- A Strategic Framework by Naga...
 
Management 11th Edition - Chapter 11 - Adaptive Organizational Design
Management 11th Edition - Chapter 11 - Adaptive Organizational DesignManagement 11th Edition - Chapter 11 - Adaptive Organizational Design
Management 11th Edition - Chapter 11 - Adaptive Organizational Design
 
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data Insights
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data InsightsThe Role of Histograms in Exploring Data Insights
The Role of Histograms in Exploring Data Insights
 
Adapting to Change: Using PEST Analysis for Better Decision-Making
Adapting to Change: Using PEST Analysis for Better Decision-MakingAdapting to Change: Using PEST Analysis for Better Decision-Making
Adapting to Change: Using PEST Analysis for Better Decision-Making
 
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of Flowcharts
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of FlowchartsFlowcharting: The Three Common Types of Flowcharts
Flowcharting: The Three Common Types of Flowcharts
 
Characteristics of professional in professional ethics
Characteristics of professional in professional ethicsCharacteristics of professional in professional ethics
Characteristics of professional in professional ethics
 
Mind Mapping: A Visual Approach to Organize Ideas and Thoughts
Mind Mapping: A Visual Approach to Organize Ideas and ThoughtsMind Mapping: A Visual Approach to Organize Ideas and Thoughts
Mind Mapping: A Visual Approach to Organize Ideas and Thoughts
 
The Final Activity in Project Management
The Final Activity in Project ManagementThe Final Activity in Project Management
The Final Activity in Project Management
 
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & Engineering
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & EngineeringBoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & Engineering
BoSUSA23 | Chris Spiek & Justin Dickow | Autobooks Product & Engineering
 
How Technologies will change the relationship with Human Resources
How Technologies will change the relationship with Human ResourcesHow Technologies will change the relationship with Human Resources
How Technologies will change the relationship with Human Resources
 
HOTEL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PPT PRESENTATION
HOTEL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PPT PRESENTATIONHOTEL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PPT PRESENTATION
HOTEL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PPT PRESENTATION
 
From Red to Green: Enhancing Decision-Making with Traffic Light Assessment
From Red to Green: Enhancing Decision-Making with Traffic Light AssessmentFrom Red to Green: Enhancing Decision-Making with Traffic Light Assessment
From Red to Green: Enhancing Decision-Making with Traffic Light Assessment
 
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentation
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentationOverview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentation
Overview PMI Infinity - UK Chapter presentation
 
The Role of Box Plots in Comparing Multiple Data Sets
The Role of Box Plots in Comparing Multiple Data SetsThe Role of Box Plots in Comparing Multiple Data Sets
The Role of Box Plots in Comparing Multiple Data Sets
 
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram Analysis
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram AnalysisExploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram Analysis
Exploring Variable Relationships with Scatter Diagram Analysis
 

Kanban vs Scrum: What's the difference, and which should you use?

  • 2. Scrum in a nutshell Form a team Collect work Prioritize work Pick up some of the work Do this work in a Sprint Show what you did Reflect on how well you did
  • 3. Form a Team • Product Owner – The voice of the customer – If you need several Product Owners, you need several Scrum Teams • Scrum Master – Removes impediments – (Not really a Project Manager) – (Not necessarily a full-time job) – (Not necessarily a permanent role) • Scrum Team – People who can Pull; don’t need work Pushed to them
  • 4. Collect Work Story Story Story Story Story Story Product Backlog: prioritized Story: something that needs to be done, that can be done in a Sprint Highest priority Story Lowest priority Story
  • 5. “As a small business owner, I want a single place to file all my quarterly reports, so I don’t have to deal with multiple agencies.”
  • 6. Write a Good Story “As a …, I want to … so that I can …” Who? What? Why? (But not how)
  • 7. Define “Done” • Agree, up-front, what Done means for each Story – Define acceptance criteria for the Story – Include as part of the Story – Agree on this before starting work • Use this definition during Show & Tell at Sprint’s End – Team formally demonstrates that acceptance criteria have been met – Product Owner accepts Story as Done. – If more/different work is required after story has been accepted, that’s a new story
  • 8. Epics & Stories Can it be done in a Sprint? You have a story Break it down into more stories Yes No
  • 9. Epics, Stories, Tasks Story 1-1 Story 1-2 Story 1-3 Story 2-1 Story 2-2 Story 2-3 Epic 1 Epic 2 Task 1-1-1 Task 1-1-2 Task 1-1-3
  • 10. Example Epic: create a mobile-friendly version of the OFM agency website • Story 1: “As a citizen, I want to be able to look up salaries from my phone” • Story 2: “As an employee, I want to be able to access HR docs from my phone” Task 2-1: Reformat the Sick Leave page
  • 11. Plan Work • Estimate relative complexity using story points Story Points ≠ Hours or Days • Complexity has a non-linear impact 2x as hard? More than 2x as long • Fibonacci Series helps 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21
  • 12. Try to Fail Fast Story Story Story Story Story Story Product Backlog: Prioritized by difficulty Try to do the hardest, riskiest work first. If project is going to fail because the work is too hard to do, it’s better to learn early than late. Hardest work first Easy work is lower priority
  • 13. Organize a Sprint • Prep: Groom the Backlog – Product Owner does this • Start: Sprint Planning – Pick a doable set of prioritized stories • Work: Daily Standups – Track progress with burndown • Deliver: Sprint Ends – Only completed stories are Done • Reflect: Sprint Retrospective – How did we do?
  • 14. Play Planning Poker A way for a team to collectively estimate complexity • Each team member has cards numbered 1, 2, 3, 5… • After a Story is reviewed, everyone simultaneously holds up a card with their personal estimate of the Story’s complexity (Story Points) – This is needed to get a wisdom of crowds estimate, where each estimate is independent • If estimates are widely divergent, team members are asked to justify their outliers: – Why did you think it is just 1 point? – And why did you think it is 8 points? • After discussion, people bid again: the estimates should start converging, as people’s understanding of the work converges. – Repeat until estimates converge to a single number; use that number.
  • 15. Commit just enough • Velocity is used to help the Scrum Team pick a suitable number of Stories for the next Sprint – Velocity is average number of Story Points delivered by the Team in previous Sprints • Commit as close to velocity as possible, without going over Example: Velocity is 20 points; commit to 19 points rather than 21. – If Team finishes before Sprint ends, pick up more Stories as stretch goals.
  • 16. How long is a Sprint? Depends… • 1 week is short • 1 month is long • 2 weeks is usually good You need to be able to do at least 1+ stories in one Sprint You need consistency across Sprints • Duration doesn’t change based upon complexity of work in a particular Sprint • Break the stories down to fit into a Sprint, not the other way around…
  • 17. Ideal Sprints Story 1 Story 2 Story 3 Story 4 Story 5 Story 6 Story 7 Story 8 Product Backlog Story 1 Story 2 Story 3 Sprint 1 Story 4 Story 5 Story 6 Sprint 2 Story 1 Story 2 Story 3 Done Story 7 Story 8 Sprint 3 Story 4 Story 5 Story 6 Story 7 Story 8
  • 18. Real-life Sprints Story 1 Story 2 Story 3 Story 4 Story 5 Story 6 Product Backlog Story 1 Story 2 Story 3 Sprint 1 Story 4 Story 5 Story 5 Sprint 2 Story 1 Story 2 Story 3 Done Story 6 Sprint 3 Story 4 Story 5 Story 6 Story 3Story 3 Story 5
  • 19. Abandoning Stories Story 1 Story 2 Story 3 Story 4 Story 5 Story 6 Product Backlog Story 1 Story 2 Story 3 Sprint 1 Story 6 Story 6 Sprint 2 Story 1 Story 2 Story 4 Done Sprint 3 Story 5 Story 6 Story 6 Story 4 Story 5 Time-sensitive story didn’t make it; gets abandoned
  • 20. Epics Across Sprints Sprint 1 Sprint 2 Story 1 Story 2 Story 3 Sprint 3 Story 4 Story 5 Story 6 Story 7 Story 8 Epic 1 Epic 2
  • 21. Run the Sprint • Protect the team – No new commitments • Measure output – Use Burndown Chart for early warning • Show & Tell – Product Owner must accept what’s Done • End Sprint – Use Retrospective to reflect – Calculate Velocity of the team
  • 23. Daily Standups: Old School In 2 minutes each, each person tells the team: • What did I get done, since yesterday? • What do I plan to do today? • What is blocking me? Scrum Master: • Remove impediments • Update Burndown • Not a Project Manager • Not a full-time job
  • 24. Daily Standups: Kerika Style Standups are not needed simply for the team to catch up on what everyone else is doing: Kerika will provide updates in real-time. Standup are not needed to identify impediments; these can be flagged in real-time. Instead, use the Daily Standup to address the most difficult problems, and answer the most strategic questions • Where individual action isn’t enough, and collective problem solving is needed Makes the Daily Standup worth attending!
  • 25. Product Owner Stays Involved Product Owners shouldn’t just appear at the Sprint Planning and Sprint Retrospectives; they should participate in the Daily Standups. As team works through stories, questions will arise; decisions will need to be taken. • Product Owner can help remove external impediments • Product Owner shouldn’t expand scope of work, but can help narrow scope when needed
  • 26. Burndown Story Points remaining Days remaining in Sprint Theory Reality Stressful slow start Panicky despair Unwarranted euphoria
  • 27. Velocity • Capacity of team, measured as historical average of Story Points delivered in past 3 Sprints • Useful for planning future Sprints – Guide to capacity of current team – Not known at the beginning – Measures perceived complexity of work; not competence or productivity of Team • Will flatline eventually – Stable team, consistent Sprints
  • 28. Scrum Retrospectives • What worked, what didn’t – Were stories clear? – Was Product Owner supportive? – Was Scrum Master helpful? • Did velocity change? – Why?
  • 29. Getting Scrum Right • Deal with distributed teams – Fluid collaboration networks – Instant situational awareness • Deal with differences in skills – Specialists often to work on multiple projects at same time. • Deal with scale – Many, many cards. Many, many boards. • Deal with chores and defects – Treat them like stories • Have a sprint theme – Avoid picking a random set of stories for a Sprint • Avoid velocity inflation
  • 30. Where Scrum Works Best • Work is new – Strategy, tactics are uncertain • Environment is fluid – Requirements / market / policy uncertainty – New partnerships are being tried • Process improvement is rhythmic – Re-prioritize work episodically • Examples: – Any & all software development
  • 31. Scrum in Government • Need regulatory flexibility in purchasing – Buying Agile services – Trying SaaS technology • Need budget flexibility in planning – Cannot realistic budget for everything that a Scrum project needs • Need organizational flexibility in career paths – Without traditional Project Managers, promotion paths need to evolve – Rewards team contribution, more than individual achievement?
  • 32. Getting Kanban Right • Deal with distributed teams – Fluid collaboration networks – Awareness with emails • Integrate Tasks + Content + Conversations – Critical elements of system • Manage capacity with Work-in-Process Limits – Personal Kanban: WIP for today – Team Kanban: WIP for function in workflow • Optimize for smooth flows – Avoid rework, waste
  • 33. Where Kanban Works Best • Work flows in continuously – Similar size and shape – Can be done by anyone – Is re-prioritized very frequently • Work is well understood – You are not inventing (much) • Examples: – Case Management, Help Desk
  • 36. Example: Personal Kanban What’s currently on Melissa’s plate, and why your request is waiting…
  • 37. Example: Team Kanban More complex workflows, and smart highlights on what’s changed
  • 38. Example: Agency Public sector example of Kanban with a distributed team
  • 39. Example: Marketing Scrum Two Scrum boards, representing different Sprints, that access the same Backlog
  • 40. Stories The crucial details that won’t fit onto a Post It
  • 41. Tasks Track all the Tasks needed to complete a Story
  • 42. Content The files and Web stuff you consume and produce for the Story
  • 43. Conversations Chat about the Story, on the Story itself
  • 44. People Identify who’s working on a Story, right now
  • 45. Tags Help link together related cards, like all the Stories that came from same Epic
  • 46. Situational Awareness What happened while you were away
  • 47. Pivoting Your View See work from a time perspective, an alternative to workflow view
  • 48. At Scale Smart highlights to zoom in on what matters most to you
  • 49. Across Projects Summary views of everything that’s happening, across all your Kerika boards, right now.
  • 50. What’s Assigned to Me? Across every board: what’s expected of you, right now?
  • 52. What Got Done? Your status report, automated
  • 53. Summary • You need technology to scale – Paper doesn’t scale • Be pragmatic, not dogmatic – The perfect team doesn’t exist • Remember to reflect, improve – Every Sprint • Get buy-in, get support – Management, policy, technology As with any religion, you need to understand the philosophy before you follow the rituals