Athena and snake

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What is the mythological connection between Athena and the snake depicted in many representations of Athena?

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  • Athena and snake

    1. 1. Who was Athena?A fictitious character or a revived version of a female from the early chapters of Genesis?
    2. 2. Athena and Poseidon
    3. 3. Athena and Heracles
    4. 4. Athena, Hera, and Demeter
    5. 5. Athena, Heracles supporting the sky, and Atlas
    6. 6. The Greeks called Noah Nereus, "TheWet One," and often referred to him as"The Salt Sea Old Man." Greek artistsdefined the development of theircontrary religious outlook (man, notGod, as the measure of all things) asbeing in opposition to Nereus/Noah.On the Altar of Zeus at Pergamon (ca.190 BC), Nereus, the Greek Noah, isTextthe only one of scores of figures notactively engaged in the battle. Thesculptors have placed him as a mutewitness to the Greek gods’ defeat ofthe Giants (his Yahweh-believing sons)signifying the end of Greek faith in hisGod. Revelation 2:13 refers to the Altar The sons of Godof Zeus as "the throne of Satan." (“giants”)intermarried with the daughters of men, but are killed off by the Greek gods
    7. 7. The inscription on this shield-band panel from 550 BC identifiesthe figures as Herakles andHalios Geron, the “Salt Sea OldMan,” an obvious allusion toNereus/Noah. His bottom halfis a fish, signifying that he camethrough the great Flood.Herakles, the Nimrod ofGenesis, demands to knowsomething that only the Salt SeaOld Man can tell him. A flameand a snake come out of Nereus’head. Herakles demands toknow from Nereus, a livingconnection to the pre-Floodworld, where he can find theenlightenment of the serpent.
    8. 8. In the next picture the Greeks celebrate the rebirth of the line of“Kain” in Athens. Earth (Gaia) presents the new-born child toAthena, who represents the reborn serpent-friendly Eve after theFlood.“The figure to the left of Gaia and the child is Hephaistos, theeldest son of Zeus and Hera, the deified Kain, the eldest son ofAdam and Eve.“According to the “myth” surrounding this event, Athena obtainedthe sperm, or seed, of Hephaistos (Kain), and placed it into theEarth, and out of Earth sprang the rejuvenated line of Kain afterthe Flood.“The essence of ancient Greek religion is very simple. After theFlood which caused the line of Kain to disappear into the earth,Athena, the reborn serpent-friendly Eve, nurtures the reborn lineof Kain which re-emerges from the earth into which it haddisappeared.” (Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr. in The Parthenon Code)
    9. 9. In the next two sculptures (restored in colorby Holmes Bryant based on the physicalevidence) appeared over the main entranceto the temple of Zeus at Olympia. SaysJohnson, “They, too, provide a simplesummary of the great celebration of Zeus-religion. On the one to the left, the greathero Herakles kills a three-bodied mannamed Geryon. Nereus, the Greek Noah,was referred to often as Halios Geron, theSalt Sea Old Man, and sometimes simply asGeron, the Old Man. The written wordGeryon itself suggests the outspring (oroffspring) of Geron, the Old Man. Thethree-bodied Geryon represents theauthority of the three sons of Noah, andHerakles by force of arms is figurativelyovercoming that authority. On Geryonsshield is painted the tripod from theprophetic temple of Apollo at Delphi,symbolizing the future. Herakles therebel, not the sons of Noah, will controlmankinds future.
    10. 10. “In the second sculpture, with the help ofAthena, Herakles pushes away the heavensand with them, the God of the heavens,receiving from Atlas the golden apples fromthe serpents tree in the Garden of theHesperides.“Together, the sculptures present a veryclear message: after overcoming theauthority of the three sons of Noah,Herakles is able to get back to the serpentstree in the Garden of the Hesperides andobtain the precious fruit which symbolizesthe enlightenment of the serpent. The Godof Noah is no longer the measure of allthings, man is. (Robert Bowie Johnson, Jr. inThe Parthenon Code)
    11. 11. “This vase depicts Herakles as getting the serpents apples directly fromthe Garden instead of from the intermediary, Atlas. Getting to the apples isthe twelfth and final labor of Herakles, and what the eleven othersultimately pointed to. Note that the vase-artist has depicted the serpentwith a beard, a symbol of age. The Book of Revelation refers to the beastas ‘the ancient serpent.’” (Johnson)
    12. 12. “Greek stories about their origins are varied and sometimescontradictory until their poets and artists settle upon Zeusand Hera as the couple from whom the other Olympian godsand mortal men are descended. This brother/sister andhusband/wife pair, the king and queen of the gods, are amatch for the Adam and Eve of Genesis. . . . This couple isthe beginning of the family of man, and the origin of thefamily of the Greek gods, Zeus and Hera. [The next picture]shows us Zeus and his wife Hera, sculpted on the east friezeof the Parthenon, c. 438 BC. With no Creator-God in theGreek religious system, the first couple advances tothe forefront.” (Johnson)

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