Sakai in Language Courses:

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This presentation details the Stanford Language Center’s use of Sakai, showing how it achieves the goal of allowing more time for face to face interactions. Future possibilities that take advantage of existing technologies and an overall framework for making the most of Sakai in language programs will also be discussed.

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  • Also material from textbooksResource sites simulate a departmental level – administrator control of assessments and efficient distribution method
  • Note: The SOPI application not work in Sakai – or on the web. If you are looking for use cases, ideas for what teachers really need but don’t have already, here is one.
  • Note: As with the Teaching with Sakai award winners this year, creativity is the hallmark of good teaching. Those teachers did that NOT with the most flexible tool in Sakai: the wiki tool. Think about why they chose that rather than the more fully-featured tools available outside of Sakai: because of the boundary and divisions that the LMS represents and actually creates.
  • Fine grained definitions for specific situations: SOPI instructor/coordinator
  • Think about the SMS / iPhone possibilities in one package. Don’t want a audio recording applet in the iphone browser.
  • Randomization of variables, variable changes from outside sources – came up this morning in samigo session
  • Classical and item response theory
  • The key is to be able to do all of this on the fly
  • Note: As with the Teaching with Sakai award winners this year, creativity is the hallmark of good teaching. Those teachers did that NOT with the most flexible tool in Sakai: the wiki tool. Think about why they chose that rather than the more fully-featured tools available outside of Sakai: because of the boundary and divisions that the LMS represents and actually creates. Once again: the primary job of any technology in education is to enhance the access of students and the creativity of teachers.I have given you 2 problems that cannot be solved with current Sakai technology: removing student control from assessment, and creating a multimedia, multi-permission, quickly updatable classroom platform.
  • Sakai in Language Courses:

    1. 1. Sakai in Language Courses: Present Uses and Future Possibilities<br />Ken Romeo, Ph.D.<br />Academic Technology Specialist<br />http://kenro.web.stanford.edu :: kenro@stanford.edu<br />
    2. 2. Outline<br />Background<br />The Present: Sakai in the Stanford Language Center<br />Objectives and Results<br />Summative Assessment<br />Formative Assessment<br />The future: What this could be<br />How students study<br />How teachers (would like to) teach<br />A framework for curriculum<br />Heads up! This is not just about language teaching.<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />2<br />
    3. 3. Background<br />Me<br />ESL instructor (20 years)<br />Academic Technology Specialist (2006)<br />CourseWork (Sakai) team meeting observer / participant (2008)<br />Stanford Language Center<br />Language requirement<br />1995 – new director: Prof. Elizabeth Bernhardt<br />Emphasis on assessment and professional development<br />This presentation<br />American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL 2007) Bernhardt, Molitoris, Miano, Gelmetti, Tsethlikai, Romeo<br />Sum of experience<br />3<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    4. 4. Sakai and the Stanford Language Center<br />The Present:<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />4<br />
    5. 5. Assessment Program<br />Objectives<br />Improve student performance<br />Enhance credibility (students and the public)<br />Programmatic consistency<br />Methods<br />ACTFL Oral Proficiency Standards (ACTFL, 1999)<br />Oral Placement and Exit exams<br />More face-time for instructors  put diagnostic assessment online (CourseWork)<br />5<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    6. 6. Overview: Results<br />More highly trained staff<br />95% go through ACTFL interview training<br />Over 1/3 certified<br />Professional conversation<br />20% first year and 24% second year increase<br />Highly positive student reaction<br />Use Sakai to:<br />Deliver formative assessments (SAMigo)<br />Connect to exit assessment (enrollment & archiving)<br />6<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    7. 7. Foreign Language Placement<br />800 unregistered students: not in Sakai<br />Online tests during the summer<br />Oral assessment on campus: 1 hour, cassette tapes<br />7<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    8. 8. Exit Assessment: SOPI Definition<br />Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI): Live<br />Nationally standard format – used everywhere<br />Simulated Oral Proficiency Interview (SOPI): Recorded<br />1st year: ~10 items, 2nd year: ~20 items: <br />English instructions + line drawing<br />Thinking time<br />Native prompt<br />Response recording<br />Go to next item (NO USER CONTROL)<br />From 2008: Add a writing assessment<br />8<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    9. 9. SOPI Application<br />July 9, 2009<br />9<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    10. 10. SOPI Monitor Tool<br />July 9, 2009<br />10<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    11. 11. SOPI Delivery<br />Scheduling, content creation – human hours<br />Software requirements<br />High stakes: content security and reliability<br />Enrollment from existing courses (Sakai)<br />Non-standard roles: Coordinator, instructor<br />No student control = no web delivery<br />Playback or recording<br />Test progression<br />Securely archive audio recordings (Sakai)<br />11<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    12. 12. SOPI Software (Project Manager: Makoto Tsuchitani)<br />Application (Developer: Casey Dunn)<br />Desktop Java application<br />Quicktime for Java – play and record<br />WebServicesto communicate with Sakai<br />Sakai Monitor Tool (Developer: Zach Thomas)<br />Realtime progress of each student<br />UI depends on role<br />Packaging for further dissemination<br />12<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    13. 13. Formative Assessments in Sakai<br />1st year: Oral diagnostic assessments<br />Collaboratively developed content (audio / video / text)<br />SAMigo: Audio Recording applet<br />Resource (course) sites<br />2nd year: Writing Diagnostic assessments<br />Collaboratively developed content (images / text)<br />SAMigo: Timed, short answer<br />Resource (course) sites<br />13<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    14. 14. Technology Integration: Key Points<br />Each part has a pedagogically valid purpose and is not focused on technology.<br />Uses a standalone application with connection to Sakai to do what the web can’t.<br />All instructors create material based on the same standards-based framework.<br />Implementation takes a huge number of human hours and coordination across many different groups.<br />14<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    15. 15. What this could Be<br />The Future:<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />15<br />
    16. 16. Prologue: Why use an LMS at all?<br />Privacy and authentication<br />Scalability: <br />class  department  university (?)<br />Modularity: <br />Centrally stored, clone-able units<br />One portal to existing technology (connection, organization, computation, audio, video, telephony, etc.)<br />16<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    17. 17. How Students Study<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />17<br />
    18. 18. Increased levels of connection<br />Cell phones: voice and text <br />Sharing – small groups, whole class, future classes (Submission? Grading? Feedback?)<br />Online office hours<br />Social networking – managing multiple identities, authentication to protect privacy<br />18<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    19. 19. Familiarity with digital environment<br />New formats for work (video, etc.)<br />Don’t always carry laptops – often use clusters, do carry cell phones<br />Use multiple resources – search / self-study / scaffolding<br />Note: Find the least common denominator<br />19<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    20. 20. How Teachers (would like to) Teach<br />My Wishlist<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />20<br />
    21. 21. Different tools for different tasks<br />In class teaching<br />Homework<br />Self-study<br />21<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    22. 22. No-brainer: Video, everywhere<br />Upload  ingest to streaming<br />Clip creation, indexing, delivery, annotation, collaboration<br />Control playback – just once, twice<br />Why streaming? Too large to download.<br />Why not YouTube? No privacy / authentication. (which is what Sakai does very, very well!)<br />22<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    23. 23. Organization (schedule, groups)<br />Course structure: Often linear, by definition<br />Tracking students<br />Integration with University registrars<br />Arbitrary groups of students<br />In/across courses/programs<br />Requirements, milestones, electives<br />23<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    24. 24. Identities (roles)<br />Need a departmental or other arbitrary level<br />Social networking (or not) …<br />Multiple identities<br />Retaining pedagogical control: Assessment<br />In/out groups: Fairness? Motivation?<br />24<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    25. 25. Assessment (SAMigo)<br />Control response format: <br />Limit and time chances to view/listen<br />Limit and time chances to respond<br />Enable large scale assessment<br />Get rid of all those blue books<br />Work with infrastructure groups: machines, space<br />Telephone (voice) delivery of Sakai is a killer app: <br />Accessibility<br />Very controlled linear assessment <br />Anyone want to be partners in a grant?<br />25<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    26. 26. Content creation (SAMigo)<br />Authoring: basic desktop tools, conversion, definitions, spell checking<br />Break up into modules: Re-usable, sharable, organize-able<br />Changing order of delivery<br />Changing details of content: Randomization of items / variables<br />Downstream control of shared content<br />26<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    27. 27. Reports (gradebook, etc.)<br />Grading on an arbitrary curve<br />Item analysis: Stats, test theory<br />Assessments / items across departments / years (aggregate-able)<br />Log files: Reportable numbers to stakeholders<br />27<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    28. 28. A Modular Curriculum<br />A Framework for the Future<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />28<br />
    29. 29. How?<br />Homework: collaboration, or not – pedagogical control<br />Self-study:<br />Students who need it<br />Students who want to do self-study <br />Publicly available “open-source” set of online activities<br />Classroom: more in a minute …<br />29<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    30. 30. Why?<br />Textbooks = information + activities + order<br />Textbooks unbound <br />Teacher must decide order<br />Information <br />Multiple sources<br />Multiple formats<br />Students can independently supplement<br />Basic unit = activity<br />Requires / allows creativity<br />30<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    31. 31. Basic curricular unit: the Activity<br />Re-conceptualize interactive lecture / seminar<br />Control information in the classroom<br />Elicit search / curiosity outside of the classroom<br />Facilitate all departments’ products <br />Linguists’ tree diagrams<br />Engineering simulations<br />Video<br />Etc.<br />31<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    32. 32. In the Classroom<br />Physical: personal interactions, hardware (or not)<br />Virtual: distance learning<br />Small group activities:<br />Quick, arbitrary, but airtight membership<br />Posting materials for each group separately<br />Posting product of each group separately<br />Quick, but controlled access to multimedia<br />Easy creation of multimedia product<br />An example: DIY fill in the blanks<br />32<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    33. 33. Classroom Example: DIY Fill in the Blanks<br />2 groups<br />2 short (30 sec) audio clips<br />2 paper transcripts<br />2 pairs of scissors<br />Each group cuts out 15 words to make a fill in the blanks problem<br />Exchange transcripts<br />Play clips (x2-3)<br />Group with most correct answers wins<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />33<br />
    34. 34. Digitize DIY Fill in the Blanks<br />Arbitrary groups<br />Secure content: audio and text<br />Modify text<br />Exchange text – without revealing original<br />Play audio<br />Check answers<br />Group collaboration<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />34<br />
    35. 35. Epilogue: Take home messages<br />Focus on the users: how can we change education? (ref: introduction of textbooks)<br />Understand what the important characteristics of pedagogy are (and are not).<br />Don’t just facilitate pedagogy as it is, find out where pedagogy is going by talking to expert teachers.<br />Focus on pedagogically valid activities – not on the tools.<br />Motivated students / creative teachers are NOT the problem: We need to reach everyone.<br />35<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />
    36. 36. Thank you very much!<br />Ken Romeo :: http://kenro.web.stanford.edu :: kenro@stanford.edu<br />July 9, 2009<br />Stanford Language Center / Academic Computing<br />36<br />

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