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Three practical (and inventive) ways of pinching keyword insight from your competitors #searchleeds #searchY

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Three practical (and inventive) ways of pinching keyword insight from your competitors #searchleeds & #searchY

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Three practical (and inventive) ways of pinching keyword insight from your competitors #searchleeds #searchY

  1. 1. Kelvin Newman Founder - BrightonSEO @kelvinnewman http://www.slideshare.net/kelvinnewman Three practical (and inventive) ways of pinching keyword insight from your competitors
  2. 2. Kelvin Newman Founder - BrightonSEO @kelvinnewman http://www.slideshare.net/kelvinnewman Three practical (and inventive) ways of pinching keyword insight from your competitors Six Hacky
  3. 3. @kelvinnewman So, who is this guy? @kelvinnewman
  4. 4. Founder of BrightonSEO @kelvinnewman kelvin@brightonseo.com http://www.slideshare.net/kelvinnewman Kelvin Newman
  5. 5. @kelvinnewman Shhhhh, but I don’t live in Brighton @kelvinnewman
  6. 6. @kelvinnewman Actually; I live in Worthing
  7. 7. @kelvinnewman Which is famous for one thing… @kelvinnewman Birdman Competition where people see how far they can jump of the pier
  8. 8. @kelvinnewman So what is this presentation about? @kelvinnewman
  9. 9. @kelvinnewman Well, this presentation isn’t about… @kelvinnewman
  10. 10. @kelvinnewman So, if you use the Google Keyword Planner you can find some excellent keywords “ “
  11. 11. @kelvinnewman No rocket science - just a few nice practical ways to get keyword ideas you might not have considered before
  12. 12. Just write for your users is a lazy suggestion. @kelvinnewman
  13. 13. We can better understand our users needs if , We can better understand how other websites are writing about a topic @kelvinnewman
  14. 14. @kelvinnewman To optimise a page now you need more than add keyphrases.
  15. 15. @kelvinnewman You need to have all the phrases and words they’d expect
  16. 16. Is the search query on the page and does deserve to rank? Old Model @kelvinnewman
  17. 17. Does it contain the search query and phrases used be other pages that rank for the term and does deserve to rank? New Model @kelvinnewman
  18. 18. Nearly always better to call them search queries rather than keywords. An aside @kelvinnewman *Reminds you the searchers is ultimately asking a question.
  19. 19. @kelvinnewman Some hacky & clunky ways of seeing those you’d need include.
  20. 20. @kelvinnewman Take the top ten results for your query and extract the text using something like textise.net Method 1
  21. 21. From this @kelvinnewman
  22. 22. To this @kelvinnewman
  23. 23. @kelvinnewman Bung the copy from all the pages into a Word Cloud Tool I like jasondavies.com/ wordcloud/
  24. 24. @kelvinnewman Treat the most common words like bingo
  25. 25. @kelvinnewman Take the top 2 results for your query and your own website. Extract the text using something like textise.net Method 2
  26. 26. @kelvinnewman Create a list of all the single words used on the page using something like writewords.org.uk/ word_count.asp
  27. 27. That gives you something like this per site @kelvinnewman
  28. 28. @kelvinnewman Create a Venn Diagram of the overlap I like Venny to do this http://bioinfogp.cnb.csic.es/tools/venny/ Method 2
  29. 29. @kelvinnewman
  30. 30. @kelvinnewman I’m really interested in the where competitors overlap but I don’t.
  31. 31. @kelvinnewman Take a key ranking page of a competitor Textise it as save as word doc Method 3
  32. 32. @kelvinnewman Go to translate.google.com and translate it to French.
  33. 33. That gives you something like this
  34. 34. Maybe go from French to Spanish
  35. 35. Then back again
  36. 36. The output will be similar but the subtle differences have value Original Mashed Up New Version You can always tell who hasn’t insulated their loft space because of the pigeons and seagulls sitting on their roof, enjoying all the warmth coming up from the house below. Heat rises, and those wily birds are quick to take advantage. You can always tell who has not isolated your loft space because of the pigeons and gulls sitting on your roof, enjoying all the heat that comes from the house below. The heat is increasing, and these intelligent birds are quick to take advantage of it. @kelvinnewman
  37. 37. @kelvinnewman We’re looking for words or phrases that end up in the new version that weren’t in the original.
  38. 38. @kelvinnewman Words like: Townhouse, Insulating panels, Etc…
  39. 39. @kelvinnewman Image search has changed it’s interface to encourage “revised queries”. Method 4
  40. 40. You’ll be used to using related searches to generate keyword ideas @kelvinnewman
  41. 41. @kelvinnewman You might even use tools to do this Use Answer the Public rather than Ubersuggest* *Never encourage Neil Patel
  42. 42. Image search generates suggestions like this @kelvinnewman
  43. 43. Worth going down a few layers deep @kelvinnewman
  44. 44. It’s also interesting the categorisation implied by the colours @kelvinnewman
  45. 45. Style ContextBrandMaterial Adjective @kelvinnewman
  46. 46. @kelvinnewman Which brings us to adjective order which I don’t think we talk about enough.
  47. 47. @kelvinnewman
  48. 48. @kelvinnewman Good news is they teach it to English Language Students.
  49. 49. @kelvinnewman This will become more apparent on voice search
  50. 50. Pinterest does something fairly similar as well
  51. 51. @kelvinnewman Wordcloud the text on a Pinterest search results, the little text that is there is usually adjective “rich”. Method 5
  52. 52. You’ll get some great adjectives this way
  53. 53. @kelvinnewman Take their Twitter Feed and Wordcloud it. Method 5
  54. 54. Simple but surprisingly effective.
  55. 55. A general lesson on keyword research to end on.
  56. 56. They saw a game Hastorf, A. H., & Cantril, H. (1954) The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology @kelvinnewman
  57. 57. The curse of knowledge is a cognitive bias that occurs when an individual, communicating with other individuals, unknowingly assumes that the others have the background to understand @kelvinnewman
  58. 58. @kelvinnewman To do better SEO, often you don’t need to reinvent the wheel, just do a few things a little better than you used to
  59. 59. @kelvinnewman kelvin@brightonseo.com http://www.slideshare.net/kelvinnewman Thanks

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