STEM Education Awards

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Presentation by Dr. Linda Rosen at the 2012 STEM Education Awards in Savannah, Georgia

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STEM Education Awards

  1. 1. STEM Vital Signs 2012 STEM Education Awards September 14, 2012 TMTM 0
  2. 2. Business Leaders Sound Alarm• Employers repeatedly say that they cannot find the STEM talent they need• Some researchers cite the number of people graduating with STEM degrees as sufficient to fill new jobs - STEM wages aren’t rising fast enough to signify a scarcity Is it a lack of qualified talent, a geographic mismatch and/or a subspecialty mismatch? TM 1
  3. 3. STEM Help Wanted in GeorgiaJobseekers outnumbered online job postings by 4.48 people to 1 job STEM jobs outnumbered unemployed people 2 jobs to 1 person TM 2
  4. 4. Growth in STEM Employment 18% 17.0% STEM Employment 15% Non-STEM Employment 12% 9.8% 9% 7.9% 6% 2.6% 3% 0% 2000-10 Growth 2008-18 Projected Growth TM 3
  5. 5. The 2018 Outlook for Georgia•Georgia will grow 360,000 jobs that require some post-secondary training•Including retirements 1.4 millions jobs vacancies will be created. Of those, 424,000 will require some postsecondary training•58 percent of jobs will require postsecondary coursework, or 2.8 million jobs overall•It’s estimated there will be 211,000 jobs in STEM TM 4
  6. 6. Earnings in STEM Jobs, 2010 TM 5
  7. 7. Educating the Future Workforce TM 6
  8. 8. Georgia must plug gaps High School Graduation Rates Georgia: 67.8% United States: 75.5% 4-year Degree Program Graduation Rates Georgia: 47.5% United States: 55.5% 2-year Degree Program Graduation Rates Georgia: 28.5% United States: 29.2% TM 7
  9. 9. Gender Gap in US Colleges Women earn 57% of collegeWomen account for 57% degrees; men 43% of college students Women account for 60% of graduate students TM 8
  10. 10. College Majors & Gender100% 90% 19 19 21 80% 50 50 70% 60 60% 77 50% 40% 81 81 79 30% Female 50 50 20% 40 Male 10% 23 0% TM 9
  11. 11. Underrepresented in STEM Degrees Conferred STEM Degrees in Georgia Conferred in Georgia, 10.3 by Gender % STEM 33.2 % Male % non- STEM 66.8 % Female 89.7 TM 10
  12. 12. GA Students Taking AP Tests 50 47 47 45 40 35 Black 30 White 25 18 18 Hispanic 20 15 12 13 12 12 Asian 10 6 6 American Native 5 0 Math Science TM 11
  13. 13. AP Passing Rates for GA70 6360 58 55 5250 48 Black 39 White40 3330 Hispanic20 18 Asian 1510 American Native 0 Math Science TM 12
  14. 14. 8th Grade Math: Glass Half FullStudent 2003 NAEP 2011 NAEP Change MostGroup Score Score since 2003 improved StateAll 270 278 +8 +17 (DC)Low-Income 253 267 +14 +19 (MA)White 283 291 +7 +17 (HI)Black 250 262 +12 +19 (NJ)Hispanic 262 277 +15 + 24 (AR) TM 13
  15. 15. Must Close Achievement GapP 51E 46 42R 40C WhiteE 29N 25 21 BlackT 18A 15 12 12G 10 HispanicE 4th Math 8th Math 4th Science 8th Science (2011) (2011) (2009) (2011) Percentage of GA Students Proficient in Math and Science TM 14
  16. 16. 8th Grade Proficiency in Science TM 15
  17. 17. Time for Science? Time Spent on Science in Georgia and U.S. 3 3 2.92.8 2.92.62.4 2.6 2.4 2.32.2 2.3 2.2 2 Georgia1.8 U.S.1.61.41.2 1 93-94 99-00 03-04 07-08 TM 16
  18. 18. Access to Rigorous Courses 40 Percentage of GA students in schools without 35 college-prep courses P e 30 White r c 25 Black e 20 n Hispanic t 15 28 Asian a 23 24 24 23 g 10 e 16 18 American 5 11 10 Native 4 0 Calculus Physics TM 17
  19. 19. Return on InvestmentGeorgia spends $28,180 per proficient student, puttingit in the fourth quintile nationwide.State with the highest return on its investment: Utah,which spends $14,202 per proficient studentState with the lowest return on its investment: D.C.,which spends $69,442 per proficient studentSmart investments will be necessary as the statemoves forward TM 18
  20. 20. Next Frontier for STEM Data• What STEM skills and knowledge do high-demand jobs require?• What is the full cost of college remediation in mathematics?• Are courses as challenging as their course titles suggest?• How effective are teachers in improving student learning in STEM subjects?• How effective is professional development for STEM teachers?What we don’t know can hurt us. TM 19
  21. 21. Change the Equation• Improve participation and performance of America’s students in STEM• Mobilize the business community to improve the quality of STEM learning in the US Craig Barrett William Green Former CEO/Chair, Intel Chairman, Accenture Glenn Britt Ellen Kullman CEO, Time Warner Cable CEO, DuPont Ursula Burns Rex Tillerson CEO, Xerox CEO, Exxon Mobil TM 20
  22. 22. Contact Information Linda Rosen lrosen@changetheequation.org 202.626.5740 www.changetheequation.org Facebook.com/changetheequation Twitter.com/changeequation TM 21

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