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Ready to Pivot, Advance, or Change? Use Side Gigs to Move Your Career Forward

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Ready to Pivot, Advance, or Change? Use Side Gigs to Move Your Career Forward

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Session for STC Conduit 2018 Conference for technical communicators looking to use side gigs in their day job or use volunteer side gigs to enhance their employability or just try new things

Session for STC Conduit 2018 Conference for technical communicators looking to use side gigs in their day job or use volunteer side gigs to enhance their employability or just try new things

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Ready to Pivot, Advance, or Change? Use Side Gigs to Move Your Career Forward

  1. 1. Ready to Pivot, Advance, or Change? Use Side Gigs to Move Your Career Forward
  2. 2. Agenda Introduction ● Getting to Know You ● Who are We? ● What’s a Side Gig? Discussions ● What do You Want to Do? ● How can You Make it Happen? Debrief ● Contact Us ● Keep in Touch ● Resources #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd
  3. 3. Introduction: Who are You? #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd
  4. 4. Introduction: Who are We? Kelly Schrank #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd
  5. 5. Kelly Stretch and Stay Employed #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd
  6. 6. Volunteer Activities ● Social Media: - Twitter - Facebook - LinkedIn ● Email Newsletter: - MailChimp ● Website: - WordPress
  7. 7. Work Activities ● Editing journal manuscripts - Something new ● Editing proposals - Something new - Created form/templates for consistency ● Editing formulary dossiers - Something I had done, but… - Now I have 3 freelance clients #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd
  8. 8. Introduction: Who are We? Todd DeLuca #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd
  9. 9. Todd Progression and Pivot • Side Gig Stories (career advancements) - Lone writer to manager - Additional responsibility (communications, newsletter) • Side Gig Examples - STC volunteering (leadership, communication, management) - Public speaking (presentations, training) - Work support (sharing work of others, email reports, SharePoint admin, content management and strategy) #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd
  10. 10. What is a Side Gig? ● Definition of side gig ● Examples of what is a side gig ● Examples of what is not a side gig #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd
  11. 11. Discussion - WhatdoYou Want to Do? #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd
  12. 12. Discussion - How can You Make it Happen? #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd
  13. 13. Debrief Question 1 ● What did you get out of the session? Question 2 ● Tell the group one thing you will do when you leave to move toward your side gig #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd
  14. 14. Keep in Touch Kelly Schrank Technical Writer and Medical Editor @headbookworm headbookworm@gmail.com linkedin.com/in/kellyschrank https://headbookworm.com/ Todd DeLuca Tech Comm Manager, Black Knight @TechCommTodd techcommtodd@gmail.com linkedin/in/techcommtodd
  15. 15. Resources Books ● What If It Does Work Out?: How a Side Hustle Can Change Your Life (Susie Moore) ● Side Hustle: From Idea to Income in 27 Days (Chris Guillebeau) ● Recession Proof Graduate: How to Get The Job You Want by Doing Free Work (Charlie Hoehn) Articles ● High-paying jobs you can do on the side - Business Insider ● 26 Practical Ways to Put Your Skills to Use and Make Extra Money in 2018 - PennyHoarder ● 101 Best Side Business Ideas While Working Full-Time - Ryan Robinson #conduit2018 @headbookworm @techcommtodd

Editor's Notes

  • Make the What do you want to do a pair discussion

    Make the How will you make it happen a group discussion
  • Go around the room
    Name
    Day Job?
    Location
    What do you hope to get out of this session?
  • Kelly
    Brief bio
    Motivation/reason for side gig
    Story and gig examples, with outcomes
  • I started as a lone editor. The company had never hired an editor before, and the client had not had an editor either, so this was a new thing for everyone.
    As time went on, I ended up hiring more editors as we grew our responsibilities with the client. By early 2016, there were 4 of us working remotely for the client.
    In June of 2016, the US team of writers and editors were laid off. This should have included me. But they kept me until I recently left for a new job.
    What I would like to focus on is what I was doing before the layoff that allowed me to still have a position with the company when the rest of the editing team and most of the writers whose work I was editing were laid off from the client’s contract and therefore the company I worked for.
  • These are pictures of me with Bobbi Werner and Beth Fisci, of the Rochester Chapter. We were the co-chairs for the Spectrum conference in 2015 and 2016. In those two years, I furthered my skills with WordPress, which is the platform we use for the Spectrum and chapter website; I got really active on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn, and I sent out emails about the conference using MailChimp.
    As it turns out, the company I work for has a website created with WordPress, so with the knowledge I had from the Spectrum website and my own WordPress website, I was able to help them update it as a side gig when I had time between my other tasks. I also started helping them promote their attendance at conferences using Twitter and LinkedIn and the website.
    And my editing team took over management of the employee newsletter, which was done in MailChimp.
    I know I have gone a little out of order, but the STC work is really where I have built my skills and experience, but I did learn how to use MailChimp from my local AMWA chapter who had me send out member emails as Member Communications Liaison. And they had me manage their LinkedIn group, so I gained a bit more experience with LinkedIn from them, too.

    So much of what I did in my day-to-day now as Communications Manager, I learned through volunteer activities.
  • But a funny thing has happened while I was PT as Communications Manager, I have ended up with other side gigs. They are related to the first day job, as they involve editing, but they were not editing tasks that I ever did when I had the initial Editor day job.
    One of my side gigs was editing journal manuscripts for publication for the company’s clients, something they thought I never had time for when I was FT on a client team as an editor. This is a new skill set for me as a medical editor, and good skills/experience for potential freelance gigs outside of my day job.
    Another side gig was editing proposals and presentations for the Business Development folks. I learned a lot about the company and industry. This also led to me creating a proposal form for them, to ensure consistency and make the process easier and faster for them. And since they don’t know how to use Word, and the fancy features I put in their new proposals, I made videos for them to show them how to use the form. This is a skill I had been wanting to learn, and having this side project gave me a good opportunity to try it out.

    The last side gig was one that has proved pretty lucrative for me. I had done this before, when part of the US team, but the company only had 5 or 6 dossiers, so it wasn’t a lot of work. But the work takes a higher level of Word and editing skills and experience with that type of document. Once they got another client who needed a lot of dossier work, they had me edit them, and that work is still continuing for me as a freelancer for the company I used for work for. I also got a couple of other clients doing similar work from someone who used to work with me.
    Will this turn into something more? Who knows? But that’s part of the fun of side gigs...it gives you a chance to see where the clients are, what types of work they need done.

    How about you, Todd, what kind of side gigs do you have?
  • Todd
    Brief bio
    Motivation/reason for side gig
    Story and gig examples, with outcomes
  • Phase 1: I started as a lone writer and became a manager through my side work as an STC volunteer and chapter leader. When parent company purchased our smaller company, I explained my qualifications and ambitions to new boss for placement in new organization. Was able to convince company leadership to create new team, with responsibility for multiple products, led by me (as most experienced technical writer).

    Phase 2: While on the job for a few years, began looking for new opportunities to advance or pivot into other work. Volunteered on the job to assist with client-facing communications, leveraging side gig work as volunteer with STC chapter (managing chapter communication). Became a part-time side job at work with extra responsibility. Benefits were that it increased my visibility within organization, exposure to upper leaders, and large salary increase in an off year (nobody else had skills or was willing to step in).
  • What is a Side Gig? (aka Hustle)
    - things done outside of your primary or day job
    - small or odd jobs
    - application of different skills
    - semi-regular activity

    Note: May be a paid or unpaid activity

    Side Gig Examples
    Volunteer positions or projects for zGXAFVC
    Group lead (sports team, scout group, community/church group, …)
    Crafts, Ebay,

    Not a Side Gig
    Hobbies (depends)
    Solo Activities (not shared)
  • Discuss with a partner potential side gigs
    Ideas
    Interests
    Skills
    Come back to the group with 1-3 ideas
  • Brainstorm as a group
    ‘How to’ or ways to address and overcome fear or potential objections
    What skills or experience do you need
    How can you leverage the skills or experience you have?
    What tasks can you do now and soon to get started (take action)


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