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24HOP Introduction to Linux for SQL Server DBAs

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1st of two sessions, focused on introduction to Linux for SQL Server DBAs

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24HOP Introduction to Linux for SQL Server DBAs

  1. 1. Presenting Sponsors Essential Linux for the DBA Kellyn Pot'Vin-Gorman, Technical Intelligence Manager, Delphix, Inc. Moderated By: Andy Yun
  2. 2. If you require assistance during the session, type your inquiry into the question pane on the right side. Maximize your screen with the zoom button on the top of the presentation window. Please fill in the short evaluation following the session. It will appear in your web browser. Technical Assistance
  3. 3. Thank You to Our Presenting Sponsors Supporting Sponsor Quest helps IT Professionals simplify administration tasks so they can focus on the evolving needs of their businesses. Combined with its commitment to help companies protect today’s investment while planning for the future, Quest continues to deliver the most comprehensive solutions to monitor, manage, protect and replicate database environments Empower users with new insights through familiar tools while balancing the need for IT to monitor and manage user created content. Deliver access to all data types across structured and unstructured sources. IDERA designs powerful software with one goal in mind – to solve customers’ most complex challenges with easy-to-use solutions. IDERA’s award- winning SQL Server database solutions and multi- platform database, application and cloud monitoring tools ensure your business never slows down. SentryOne empowers Microsoft data professionals to achieve breakthrough performance across physical, virtual and cloud environments. We develop solutions to monitor, diagnose, and optimize SQL Server performance, including Plan Explorer, the query-tuning tool with more than 100,000 downloads.
  4. 4. Attend PASS Summit to Grow Your Career The Community PASS Summit is the largest conference for technical professionals who leverage the Microsoft Data Platform. November 6-9 | Seattle, WA PASSsummit.com Connect with a global network of 250,000+ data professionals
  5. 5. B Speaker Speaker numerous technical conferences for Oracle, Big Data, DevOps Testing and SQL Server Kellyn Pot’vin-Gorman Member of the Oak Table Network dbakevlar.com @DBAKevlar linkedin.com/in/kellynpotvin Oracle ACE Director alumnus Technical Intelligence Manager at Delphix
  6. 6. Presenting Sponsors Essential Linux for the DBA Kellyn Pot'Vin-Gorman, Technical Intelligence Manager, Delphix, Inc.
  7. 7. So SQL Server Has Come to the World of Linux There’s a lot to learn about Linux… Learning how to: • Navigate • Manage • Gather information • Monitor
  8. 8. But You Need to Learn to Walk Before You Run.. 8
  9. 9. History Lesson • 1991 project by Linus Torvalds from Finland to create free operating system kernel. • Based on C programming • Almost was named Freax • Now all part of the GNU Project • Debian, Redhat, Oracle Linux, Ubuntu, Suse are all flavors of Linux. • Microsoft introduces SQL Server on Linux in version 2017 beta 9
  10. 10. Accessing a Linux Host • Most Common Tools • Putty, (free download) • Terminal, (MAC) • Docker or VM image with terminal via Linux console. • SSH, (Secure Shell) ssh OSUsername@<hostname or IP address> 10
  11. 11. User, Groups and Penguins, Oh My! • Don’t do everything as ROOT, (aka super user) • Perform administrator tasks by using SUDO, (switch user domain owner) • Log in as with your own user ID and su, (switch user) to the application owner. • There is a UID, (User ID) for every user name. • Each user is assigned a group(s) for role hierarchy • A home directory will contain the following: • Profile, (RC) with environment variables, alias’ and other necessary configurations for the user environment. 11
  12. 12. RC and Profiles • RC file stands for Run Commands • Profile is similar, but set up as a secondary set of profile settings, including: • Shell to be used • Alias’ • Environment variables • Path information • File name begins with a “.” • View with command ls -la .bashrc .bash_rc .profile .profile_xx 12
  13. 13. Example of a profile #/! /usr/bin/sh EDITOR=nano # EDITOR=vi sudo visudo export PATH = $PATH:. # export ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/dbhome_1/db12c export SQL_HOME=/u01/app/mssql/140 export LANG=en.UTF-8 export JAVA_HOME=/usr/bin/java # alias info alias reload=’source ~/.bash_profile’ alias pre-‘open -a Preview’ alias cd.. =’cd ..’ 13
  14. 14. Creating Users • Useradd has different results than adduser, but both work. • Useradd will require you to: • Manually update the password with passwd <username> • Manually assign a group with usermod after creating a manual group with groupadd command • If you wish to add any pertinent information about the user, that must be added manually. A user should be created for every user logging in. Don’t share logins. Avoid non-audited, such as direct ROOT access. Grant SUDO with great care. Grant SU to only those that require it. 14
  15. 15. SU and SUDO • To switch to from existing user to become jsmith: $ su – jsmith • To execute a command as ROOT after being granted SUDO privileges $ sudo setsys.sh –y 15
  16. 16. Understanding File Permissions Where this can be confusing for some, is that we visibly identify the grants by their values, either as separate values or as totals. • Read,(r)= 4 • Write,(w)= 2 • Execute, (x)=1 • owner has 4+2+1=7 • group has 4+2+1=7 • other has 4+2+1=7 16
  17. 17. Changing Permissions • CHMOD= change modify $ chmod <filename> XXX $ chmod test.txt 764 • Owner- read, write, execute • Group- read, write • Other- read You must have permissions to update the permissions or must SU/SUDO to perform them: $ sudo chmod test.txt 764 17
  18. 18. Changing File Owner • CHOWN = change owner $ chown <newuser>:<group> <filename> $ chown jsmith:dba test.sh • You must have privileges or own the file to begin with to change the ownership. 18
  19. 19. Basics What Command Common Change Diretory cd cd, cd .. ,cd /directory path List or Directory information ls ls, ls –lf, ls –la Locate program find <program name> find java, find sql Locate which installation used which <program name> which mssql Current Directory pwd pwd Create Directory mkdir mkdir scripts mkdir /u01/apps/scripts Create File touch <filename>, vim <filename> touch test.sh Edit File vim <filename>, vi <filename> vim touch.sh Remove rm <filename> rm touch.sh ** rmdir 19
  20. 20. Processes • Ps command $ ps $ ps –ef To Kill a process, (BECAREFUL!) $ kill <PID> 20
  21. 21. Editors • VI/VIM makes you cool- old school • Nano • eMacs • Create a file easily by issuing the touch command $ touch <filename> 21
  22. 22. VI(M) Command line editor $ vi <filename> • Go down a line: j • Go up a line: k • Go to the right: l • Go to the left: h • Insert: i • Append: a • Append to the end of a line: a • Add a line and insert below your cursor: o 22 Add a line and insert ABOVE your cursor: <shft> o Undo: u Quit without saving: :q Quit without saving to a read only file: :q! Write to a file: :w Write to a read only file, (override): :w! Write to a file and quit: :wq Write to a read only file, (override) and quit: :wq!
  23. 23. Redirecting Data Output to a File • $ <command> > <filename> $ ls > filelist.txt $ ls >> filelist.txt • If run again with the “>>”, the results will be appended to the first file’s contents. 23
  24. 24. Running an Update on Linux • Updates and Installations are done most often via Yum, APT-GET or Zypper • Using APT-GET • Update from repository, (stored in $ apt-get update • Install updates, (may require SUDO) $ apt-get install 24
  25. 25. Adding Utilities is Done via Packages • Common Installers for Linux • YUM • APT-GET • ZYPPER Installing a package with APT-GET $ sudo apt-get install –y <pkgname> Viewing package information: $apt-cache pkgname <pkgname> Display package information: $apt-cache show <pkgname> 25
  26. 26. Cheat Sheets for Common Installers • Yum: https://access.redhat.com/articles/yum-cheat-sheet • Apt-Get https://blog.packagecloud.io/eng/2015/03/30/apt-cheat- sheet/ • Zypper: https://en.opensuse.org/images/1/17/Zypper-cheat-sheet- 1.pdf 26
  27. 27. Mission Impossible • Initial Powershell for Linux: https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell • BASH, (Born again shell) • KSHELL, (Korn Shell) • CSHELL, (based off C) • Shell scripting is very similar in each of these languages and very different from Powershell. 27
  28. 28. Linux system-level diagnostics • CPU and Memory • Process • Network • Other useful Linux diagnostic utilities • Support recommended diagnostic tools • A great source of living technical information
  29. 29. Utilities to View Resource Usage • SAR • SADC/SADF • MPSTAT • VMSTAT • TOP 29
  30. 30. Common Arguments and Values • Some of the utilities aren’t standard and may need to be installed. • Yum and apt-get are your friend • You may require sudo, (super user) privileges to install • <command> -x(xx) • Arguments are cap sensitive, (as is everything in Unix world.) • <command> -x 5 5 • First how many second sleep, Second value is how many results to return • <command> -h • Provides help information about the utility or command 30
  31. 31. What is SAR? • System Activity Report • Provides information about • CPU • Memory and virtual memory • I/O • Network • Provided by the SYSSTAT package • What if it’s missing? • Install it as root: $yum -y install sysstat $apt-get install sysstat 31
  32. 32. sar Utility • CPU utilization: sar -u • %usr, %sys, %idle • %nice • Intervals of CPU: sar 1 3 • 3 times, every 1 second • CPU run queue report: sar -q • Runq-sz • plist-sz and load averages • Context switching activity: sar -w • cswch/s • Virtual memory swapping: sar -W • swpin/s, swpot/s • Virtual memory paging: sar -B • pgpgin/s, pgpgot/s
  33. 33. sar Utility $ sar -u 5 5 Linux 2.6.32-573.22.1.el6.x86_64 (linuxsource.delphix.local) 11/28/2017 _x86_64_ (2 CPU) 06:15:31 PM CPU %user %nice %system %iowait %steal %idle 06:15:36 PM all 0.20 0.00 0.20 48.58 0.00 51.01 06:15:41 PM all 0.30 0.00 0.20 47.98 0.10 51.41 06:15:46 PM all 0.30 0.00 0.20 46.92 0.00 52.58 06:15:51 PM all 0.20 0.00 0.20 47.77 0.00 51.82 06:15:56 PM all 0.20 0.00 0.20 47.78 0.10 51.72 Average: all 0.24 0.00 0.20 47.81 0.04 51.71
  34. 34. sar Utility $ sar -q 5 5 Linux 2.6.32-573.22.1.el6.x86_64 (linuxsource.delphix.local) 11/28/2017 _x86_64_ (2 CPU) 06:16:45 PM runq-sz plist-sz ldavg-1 ldavg-5 ldavg-15 06:16:50 PM 0 190 1.37 1.28 1.30 06:16:55 PM 0 190 1.34 1.28 1.29 06:17:00 PM 0 190 1.31 1.27 1.29 06:17:05 PM 0 190 1.36 1.29 1.30 06:17:10 PM 0 190 1.34 1.28 1.30 Average: 0 190 1.34 1.28 1.30
  35. 35. What is SADC/SADF? • sadc: back-end system activity data collector utility behind sar • Collects specified system data at configured intervals • Saves data to specified binary files • sadf: system activity data formatter • report on data collected by sadc/sar • output to be consumed by other programs like awk, MS-Excel, etc • Options for translating and displaying dates, numbers, text • Output to plain text or XML
  36. 36. What is MPSTAT? • Reports processor level statistics 36
  37. 37. mpstat utility Processor Level Statisitcs $ mpstat –P ALL Linux 2.6.32-573.22.1.el6.x86_64 (linuxsource.delphix.local) 11/28/2017 _x86_64_ (2 CPU) 06:18:10 PM CPU %usr %nice %sys %iowait %irq %soft %steal %guest %idle 06:18:10 PM all 1.42 0.00 0.19 8.01 0.00 0.00 0.02 0.00 90.36 06:18:10 PM 0 1.38 0.00 0.21 15.10 0.00 0.00 0.02 0.00 83.29 06:18:10 PM 1 1.45 0.00 0.17 0.94 0.00 0.00 0.02 0.00 97.42
  38. 38. What is VMSTAT? • Virtual memory statistics 38
  39. 39. vmstat Utility Virtual Memory Statistics vmstat 5 5 procs -----------memory---------- ---swap-- -----io---- --system-- -----cpu----- r b swpd free buff cache si so bi bo in cs us sy id wa st 0 2 28612 131668 255192 6766272 0 0 0 148 1 3 1 0 90 8 0 0 1 28612 234736 255204 6766424 0 0 24 1480 1485 2737 2 1 48 49 0 0 2 28612 234752 255208 6766536 0 0 0 1511 1365 2632 0 0 50 50 0 1 1 28612 234752 255208 6766664 0 0 0 1399 1353 2626 0 0 50 50 0 0 2 28612 218164 255216 6766784 0 0 18 1310 1337 2591 0 0 49 51 0
  40. 40. top Utility Tasks: 165 total, 1 running, 164 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie Cpu(s): 0.3%us, 0.2%sy, 0.0%ni, 53.5%id, 46.0%wa, 0.0%hi, 0.0%si, 0.0%st Mem: 8057984k total, 7827928k used, 230056k free, 255324k buffers Swap: 311292k total, 28612k used, 282680k free, 6771660k cached PID USER PR NI VIRT RES SHR S %CPU %MEM TIME+ COMMAND 9888 delphix 20 0 636m 43m 16m S 0.7 0.5 51:40.68 mssql 9892 delphix 20 0 636m 43m 16m D 0.7 0.5 51:18.86 mssql 9886 delphix 20 0 652m 43m 16m S 0.3 0.6 51:19.84 mssql 1 root 20 0 19232 976 820 S 0.0 0.0 0:26.11 delcli 2 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 kthreadd 3 root RT 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:09.92 migration/0
  41. 41. What is UPTIME? • uptime displays current time and up-time • Also displays the average number of processes in run-queue over the past 1 minute, 5 minutes, and 15 minutes (a.k.a. load average) 41
  42. 42. uptime and w Utilities $ uptime 18:20:41 up 41 days, 17 min, 1 user, load average: 1.17, 1.28, 1.30 • w displays same info plus info about logged-in UNIX users $ w 18:21:05 up 41 days, 17 min, 1 user, load average: 1.25, 1.29, 1.30 USER TTY FROM LOGIN@ IDLE JCPU PCPU WHAT delphix pts/0 c-67-164-182-219 18:05 0.00s 0.02s 0.02s sshd: delphix [priv]
  43. 43. Process Diagnostics • ps • Process status • pmap • Process mapping • http://dbakevlar.com/2017/12/sql-server-2017-linux-processes/ • dstat • Disk, cpu and network monitoring • nmon • Color coded display of cpu, disk and memory statistics
  44. 44. Process Diagnostics • top • Display “top” resource-consuming processes and totals • Ctrl + C to exit ongoing refresh • ps • Process status • pmap • Process mapping • dstat • Disk, cpu and network monitoring
  45. 45. top Utility Tasks: 165 total, 1 running, 164 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie Cpu(s): 0.3%us, 0.2%sy, 0.0%ni, 53.5%id, 46.0%wa, 0.0%hi, 0.0%si, 0.0%st Mem: 8057984k total, 7827928k used, 230056k free, 255324k buffers Swap: 311292k total, 28612k used, 282680k free, 6771660k cached PID USER PR NI VIRT RES SHR S %CPU %MEM TIME+ COMMAND 9888 delphix 20 0 636m 43m 16m S 0.7 0.5 51:40.68 mssql 9892 delphix 20 0 636m 43m 16m D 0.7 0.5 51:18.86 mssql 9886 delphix 20 0 652m 43m 16m S 0.3 0.6 51:19.84 mssql 1 root 20 0 19232 976 820 S 0.0 0.0 0:26.11 delcli 2 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 kthreadd 3 root RT 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:09.92 migration/0
  46. 46. ps Utility • SysV version with many versions and variations: $ ps -eaf % ps -aux # ps –eo opt[,opt…] • Provides info about individual processes • Status, PID, PPID, user, command text and parameters • Cumulative and recent CPU usage • Memory (virtual, resident)
  47. 47. ps Utility • An easy home-grown “top” command $ ps –eaf | sort –n | tail root 689 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:00 [ext4-dio-unwrit] root 7 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:12 [migration/1] root 723 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:01:34 [kauditd] root 781 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:18 [flush-253:0] root 8 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:00 [stopper/1] root 9 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:06 [ksoftirqd/1] root 99 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:00 [kdmremove] rpc 1101 1 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:01 rpcbind
  48. 48. ps Utility • Another home-grown “top” command • Also displays memory consumption in Kbytes $ ps -eo user,pid,pcpu,vsz,rss,comm | sort -n | tail root 689 0.0 0 0 ext4-dio-unwrit root 7 0.0 0 0 migration/1 root 723 0.0 0 0 kauditd root 781 0.0 0 0 flush-253:0 root 8 0.0 0 0 stopper/1 root 9 0.0 0 0 ksoftirqd/1 root 99 0.0 0 0 kdmremove rpc 1101 0.0 18980 588 rpcbind
  49. 49. ps Utility • Displaying environment variable values within a process $ ps -eaf | grep jar delphix 11313 1 0 Oct18 ? 00:23:10 /usr/java/jdk1.7.0_51/bin/java - Djava.util.logging.config.file=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/conf/logging.properties - Djava.util.logging.manager=org.apache.juli.ClassLoaderLogManager - Djava.endorsed.dirs=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/endorsed -classpath /u02/app/apache- tomcat-7.0.42/bin/bootstrap.jar:/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/bin/tomcat-juli.jar - Dcatalina.base=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42 -Dcatalina.home=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42 - Djava.io.tmpdir=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/temp org.apache.catalina.startup.Bootstrap start $ ps eww 11313 PID TTY STAT TIME COMMAND 11313 ? Sl 23:10 /usr/java/jdk1.7.0_51/bin/java - Djava.util.logging.config.file=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/conf/logging.properties - Djava.util.logging.manager=org.apache.juli.ClassLoaderLogManager - Djava.endorsed.dirs=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/endorsed -classpath /u02/app/apache- tomcat-7.0.42/bin/bootstrap.jar:/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/bin/tomcat-juli.jar - Dcatalina.base=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42 -Dcatalina.home=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42 - Djava.io.tmpdir=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/temp org.apache.catalina.startup.Bootstrap start SHELL=/bin/bash TERM=xterm USER=delphix PATH=/sbin:/usr/sbin:/bin:/usr/bin PWD=/ HOME=/home/delphix SHLVL=3 LOGNAME=delphix _=/usr/java/jdk1.7.0_51/bin/java
  50. 50. CPU/Memory Diagnostics • Use top and/or ps to identify process activity in Linux • By current CPU activity • By total CPU time consumed • By time started • By process name • By UNIX account • By process hierarchy • parent processes, child processes, etc.
  51. 51. pmap Utilities Example $ pmap -x 11313 11313: /usr/java/jdk1.7.0_51/bin/java -Djava.util.logging.config.file=/u02/app/apache-tomcat- 7.0.42/conf/logging.properties -Djava.util.logging.manager=org.apache.juli.ClassLoaderLogManager - Djava.endorsed.dirs=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/endorsed -classpath /u02/app/apache-tomcat- 7.0.42/bin/bootstrap.jar:/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/bin/tomcat-juli.jar -Dcatalina.base=/u02/app/apache-tomcat- 7.0.42 -Dcatalina.home=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42 -Djava.io.tmpdir=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/temp org.apache.cata Address Kbytes RSS Dirty Mode Mapping 0000000000400000 4 0 0 r-x-- java 0000000000600000 4 4 4 rw--- java … 00007f09de9a6000 4 0 0 r--s- commons-daemon.jar 00007f09de9a7000 4 0 0 r--s- bootstrap.jar 00007f09de9a8000 32 16 12 rw-s- 11313 00007f09de9b3000 4 4 4 r---- ld-2.12.so 00007f09de9b4000 4 4 4 rw--- ld-2.12.so 00007f09de9b5000 4 4 4 rw--- [ anon ] 00007fff04ccb000 84 32 32 rw--- [ stack ] 00007fff04df6000 4 4 0 r-x-- [ anon ] ffffffffff600000 4 0 0 r-x-- [ anon ] ---------------- ------ ------ ------ total kB 3294068 188964 186976
  52. 52. fuser/lsof Utilities • Displays list of UNIX processes using file-system $ df -k Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/mapper/vg_linuxsource-lv_root 14600800 3135856 10720092 23% / tmpfs 4028992 0 4028992 0% /dev/shm /dev/xvda1 487652 132589 329463 29% /boot /dev/xvdf 30832636 28133056 1126716 97% /u01 /dev/xvdg 20511356 4213904 15248876 22% /u02 $ fuser /dev/xvdf /dev/xvdf: 727ctm 725ctm 723ctm 722tm 720ctom 633tom 623tom 462o 458o 456o 454o 452o 450o 448o 446o 444o
  53. 53. What is DSTAT? • Monitoring tool for CPU, disk and network activity • Displays ongoing values in interval until q(uit) • To Install: $ yum install dstat –y Or $ sudo apt-get install dstat 53
  54. 54. ps Utility • SysV version with many versions and variations: $ ps -eaf % ps -aux # ps –eo opt[,opt…] • Provides info about individual processes • Status, PID, PPID, user, command text and parameters • Cumulative and recent CPU usage • Memory (virtual, resident)
  55. 55. ps Utility • An easy home-grown “top” command $ ps –eaf | sort –n | tail root 689 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:00 [ext4-dio-unwrit] root 7 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:12 [migration/1] root 723 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:01:34 [kauditd] root 781 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:18 [flush-253:0] root 8 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:00 [stopper/1] root 9 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:06 [ksoftirqd/1] root 99 2 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:00 [kdmremove] rpc 1101 1 0 Oct18 ? 00:00:01 rpcbind
  56. 56. ps Utility • Another home-grown “top” command • Also displays memory consumption in Kbytes $ ps -eo user,pid,pcpu,vsz,rss,comm | sort -n | tail root 689 0.0 0 0 ext4-dio-unwrit root 7 0.0 0 0 migration/1 root 723 0.0 0 0 kauditd root 781 0.0 0 0 flush-253:0 root 8 0.0 0 0 stopper/1 root 9 0.0 0 0 ksoftirqd/1 root 99 0.0 0 0 kdmremove rpc 1101 0.0 18980 588 rpcbind
  57. 57. ps Utility • Displaying environment variable values within a process $ ps -eaf | grep jar delphix 11313 1 0 Oct18 ? 00:23:10 /usr/java/jdk1.7.0_51/bin/java - Djava.util.logging.config.file=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/conf/logging.properties - Djava.util.logging.manager=org.apache.juli.ClassLoaderLogManager - Djava.endorsed.dirs=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/endorsed -classpath /u02/app/apache- tomcat-7.0.42/bin/bootstrap.jar:/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/bin/tomcat-juli.jar - Dcatalina.base=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42 -Dcatalina.home=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42 - Djava.io.tmpdir=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/temp org.apache.catalina.startup.Bootstrap start $ ps eww 11313 PID TTY STAT TIME COMMAND 11313 ? Sl 23:10 /usr/java/jdk1.7.0_51/bin/java - Djava.util.logging.config.file=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/conf/logging.properties - Djava.util.logging.manager=org.apache.juli.ClassLoaderLogManager - Djava.endorsed.dirs=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/endorsed -classpath /u02/app/apache- tomcat-7.0.42/bin/bootstrap.jar:/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/bin/tomcat-juli.jar - Dcatalina.base=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42 -Dcatalina.home=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42 - Djava.io.tmpdir=/u02/app/apache-tomcat-7.0.42/temp org.apache.catalina.startup.Bootstrap start SHELL=/bin/bash TERM=xterm USER=delphix PATH=/sbin:/usr/sbin:/bin:/usr/bin PWD=/ HOME=/home/delphix SHLVL=3 LOGNAME=delphix _=/usr/java/jdk1.7.0_51/bin/java
  58. 58. What is FINDMNT? • A [somewhat] directory tree view of Linux • To Install: $ yum install findmnt –y $ apt-get install findmnt 58
  59. 59. findmnt Utility 59
  60. 60. findmnt Utility • findmnt -m 60
  61. 61. What is NCDU? • Quick utility to gather info on space usage in a directory • To install: $ yum install ncdu –y $ apt-get install ncdu Simply execute ncdu command in directory that you wish to gather detailed file/directory sizes on 61
  62. 62. ncdu Utility 62
  63. 63. Linux for the DBA Summary • Learn to walk before you run • Command line is essential • Utilities are your friends • A few will get you far, choose which ones provide you with what you need. • Build a knowledge of command line editing tools, such as VIM or Nano and Shell scripting to enhance utilities for full coverage. • Tough at first, but will become second nature- I promise! 63
  64. 64. Ready to Get Started? Microsoft Azure account will have you on Linux in minutes. A Linux VM or Docker Image with access to an outside network to perform installations of tools and/or software as needed. • Docker for Windows • Docker for Mac • VMWare or VirtualBox
  65. 65. QUESTIONS?
  66. 66. Coming up next… Pods, Containers, and SQL Server--What You Need to Know Joey D’Antoni
  67. 67. THANK YOU FOR ATTENDING @sqlpass #sqlpass @PASScommunity Presenting Sponsors

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