What's New in the World of Irises

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  • Zone 5: March to July
  • Zone 5: March to JulyDeserts, woodlands, alpine meadows, prairies, shorelines, swamps
  • Zone 5: March to July
  • Zone 5: March to July
  • We don’t have to make gardening easier because it already can be easy for folks. We just have to sell it like it’s easy, fun, passionate, enjoyable, emotive, hip, and on-cue.New irises aren’t harder Right plant=right place, has consequences here worth evaluating. Everything won’t grow somewhere. All plants aren’t created equalBut not a gospel of “oh how great”, there are problemsRegional gardeningIris for every situation
  • Zone 5: March to July
  • Primarily 12 species
  • Alpine butterfly
  • Honey dripper
  • Blyth sdlg.
  • Cape Cod Boys
  • Hot sketch
  • Miss apple
  • Lucy Locket
  • Banjo Blues
  • Snook
  • Sugar Dome
  • Sunrise Ridge
  • Pseudata seedling
  • What's New in the World of Irises

    1. 1. Kelly D. NorrisRainbow Iris Farm
    2. 2.  Is more always better? ~1,000 new cultivars/year Amateur development
    3. 3.  But who have we forgotten?
    4. 4.  Collectors Mass-market/wholesale But what about YOUR clients?
    5. 5. An iris for Update Recap, every time! dude garden
    6. 6.  Remember provenance Plant equality? Right plant=right place?
    7. 7.  THE question, perhaps Quantitative trait (QTL) Environmental influence Poorly understood physiology Distinct breeding groups
    8. 8.  Distinction, distinction, distinction Better rebloomers Shorter and smaller cultivars Cut flowers
    9. 9. What’s the big deal? Better irises
    10. 10. So many…1,000
    11. 11. Exciting, right? Iris lovers!
    12. 12. Iris Lovers Who are we breeding irises for? Why are we breeding irises?
    13. 13. Kelly’s Top Five PerennialsDistinctiveness Medians Better rebloomers Cut flowers
    14. 14. NOT “I. germanica”I. x alto-burbata?I. x conglomerata?
    15. 15. Miniature Dwarf Bearded
    16. 16. Kelly’s Market Outlook: MDBs Some interest, particularly with rock gardeners Container gardening? Vigor/clump potential sells
    17. 17. ‘Fission Chips’(Keppel, 2004)
    18. 18. ‘Tiny Titan’ (Aitken, 2002)
    19. 19. ‘Flashing Neon’ (Willott, 2005)
    20. 20. Standard Dwarf Bearded
    21. 21. Kelly’s Market Outlook: SDBs When I say dwarf, you think SDBs… Iris lovers can’t get enough of them… Nursery container production potential Buds on the horizon…
    22. 22. Paul Black I126A
    23. 23. ‘Cat’s Eye’
    24. 24. ‘Gigglesand Grins’(Coleman, 2007)
    25. 25. ‘Eye of the Tiger’
    26. 26. Intermediate & Border Bearded
    27. 27. Kelly’s Market Outlook: IBs & BBs Possibly the perfect irises for the future (urban gardens) Crossroads of genetics and selection Fertility dawns… Classification woes?
    28. 28. ‘Man’s Best Friend’
    29. 29. ‘Gene’s Lora Lavelle’
    30. 30. ‘Fast Forward’
    31. 31. ‘Banded Gold’
    32. 32. ‘Bundle of Love’
    33. 33. Miniature Tall Bearded
    34. 34. Kelly’s Market Outlook: MTBs Cut flower industry Dips, tets Timeless garden plants Hardiness and showmanship!
    35. 35. ‘LucyDoodle’
    36. 36. ‘RayosAdentro’
    37. 37. Chuck Bunnell seedling
    38. 38. ‘Dividing Line’
    39. 39. ‘Hot News’
    40. 40. Tall Bearded
    41. 41. Kelly’s Market Outlook: TBs Go for glory—clump power! Bud counts over 8 probably irrelevant Distinctiveness coupled with vigor Loss of market share?
    42. 42. ‘Tobacco Chew’ (Burseen, 2009)
    43. 43. ‘Starring’
    44. 44. ‘Gypsy Lord’
    45. 45. ‘Honeydripper’
    46. 46. ‘Alan M. Turing’
    47. 47. ‘Won’t’
    48. 48. ‘Ten Carat Diamond’
    49. 49.  Range of heights (18-48”) Early summer doers Expanded color palette Expanded bloom time (up to 6 weeks) 28 versus 40
    50. 50. Iris chrysographes
    51. 51. ‘Cape Cod Boys’
    52. 52. ‘Hot Sketch’
    53. 53. ‘Miss Apple’
    54. 54. ‘Cream of Tomato’
    55. 55. ‘Humors of Whiskey’
    56. 56. ‘Lucy Locket’
    57. 57. ‘At The Crossroads’
    58. 58.  Sorely underappreciated June bloomers Colors not found elsewhere Perfect florist irises Long-lasting landscape impact
    59. 59. ‘Falcon’s Crest’
    60. 60. ‘Missouri Clouds’
    61. 61. ‘With One Look’
    62. 62.  Acidic soils! The last hurrah… New genotypes yield increased hardiness You want big, eh?
    63. 63. ‘Banjo Blues’
    64. 64. ‘Snook’
    65. 65. ‘Sugar Dome’
    66. 66. ‘Christina’s Gown’
    67. 67. ‘Pixie Won’
    68. 68.  Louisianas SPEC-X Arils/Arilbreds Crested irises Chinensis group I. x norrisii hybrids
    69. 69. Iris domestica (blackberry lily)
    70. 70. (blackberry lily), Iris dichotoma (Vesper iris)
    71. 71. Iris x norrisii (candy lily)
    72. 72.  www.kellydnorris.com  Posted via SlideShare Twitter: @rainbowirisfarm Facebook too!
    73. 73. www.rainbowfarms.net

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