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Translated by: 
Robert Fitzgerald
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References

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Submitt -. 
Adotto,  Kea E
Mas,  Iodelyn S. 
Ba. l<1ao, t(asandra Ctaudine G. 
N-8BEEd
Aeneid Virgil (Book II: How They Took The City)
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Aeneid Virgil (Book II: How They Took The City)

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This story on the book II of Aeneid doesn't just help us understand the life of the mentioned characters. It may also be used for us to reflect on our own decisions and stories as well.
We recommend you to read not just this particular book but the other books of the Aenid too. Enjoy reading !

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Aeneid Virgil (Book II: How They Took The City)

  1. 1. Translated by: Robert Fitzgerald
  2. 2. u mg,
  3. 3. Roman Empire One of the greatest civilizations in history. Began in 753 BC. From the Rhine River to Egypt and from Britain to Asia Minor Rome (over two million square miles) was controlled by x I Rome.
  4. 4. 1.. -lT3R8T? -38$ O-¢OQU - Written in the Latin language - The focus of the literature were historical epics telling of the early military history of Rome, poetry, comedi histories and tragedies. ‘ - The 1st Century BCE up to the mi Century CE was the “Golden Age Literature".
  5. 5. WHAT l5 THE §fl!3.$§ Cl? THE $TClRY ° Emperor Augustus asked Virgil to write an epic poem glorifying Rome and the Roman people. - Virgil look at it as an opportun his lifelong ambition which is to Roman epic to challenging Homer develop a Caesarist mythology as * fulfill
  6. 6. /, rz/ -/ I p r I I . I I I‘ ‘V; "j , rfi"" (‘i‘= _" “‘ ""' ",5 ""_‘v F"" "" '_, _ ' ik ‘j r ".7E_--‘-_: ---_4 -: -_: _- L, '. -_--"‘-_. _--.1--‘ L. .l. ‘./ __[‘. =--_-g/ } Born on October 15, 7O BCE. in the farming village of Andes, near Mantua, in Nothern Italy His parents are Vergilius Mara and Magia Polla He won recognition for his Eclogues or Bucolics which is a pastoral poems reflecting the event of / irgils own day Another work of him IS the Georgies which is didactic poems on farming The last 10 years of Virgil ‘s life were spent for writing The Aeneid He died on September 21, 19 BC even before the publication of Roman national epic, The Aeneid. if " . _ . ,_§i‘-_
  7. 7. TYPE Cl? l. «lT§R8T¥-33$ Epic Poem It is considered an epic po a | ong, _serious, poetic narrat a significant event, featurin
  8. 8. Heroic epic: Mythological st It can be considered an heroic epic features a hero and that hero‘ quest. time, it presents Roman myths and th their mythologica character
  9. 9. The Aeneid of Virgil can be consic' ‘red to be having an episodic plot structure cause it is divided into series or book and o ' s" is a story itself.
  10. 10. X lS? &t. .MA§Yi 0? THE §! i<. .%E " “es Aafifi. . ‘ 5' r4‘s'. ~w. :~’s'"e*«~ I ‘U 3 During a banquet in Carthage given by Queen Dido, ' Cupid made the queen fall for Aeneas. In order to prolong the stay of Aeneas, Queen Dido asked Aeneas to narrate the story behind the fall of Troy and his succeeding wanderings. Aeneas, though in pain with the memories of those events, started to tell the reason i behind the final act of struggling. -of Troy.
  11. 11. Aeneas started that it's all because of the huge horse made of timber created by the Greeks with the help of Pallas. Inside the horse's belly are the armed Greeks. After the war, the people of Troy thought that the Greeks are already gone. Thinking this way, the Trojans celebrated, happily looked at the campsite left by the Greeks.
  12. 12. Then, the presence of the horse created a commotion among the Dardanians (people of Troy). A Trojan leader named Thymoetes insisted that the horse should be drawn inside the walls and be highly moored on a safe place of defense in Troy. On the other hand, another Trojan leader, together with some other Dardanians opposed the said idea. They suggest that the horse must be thrown into the sea or be burned. Then all of then, the people just noticed the presence of the Trojan priest of god Neptune, Laocoon. Laocoon hurried to Troy to warn the people about the said horse. He said that it is something they should not trust and that this is just to be used against them.
  13. 13. After stating this part of Trojan's ~ struggle, Aeneas couldn t help but be emotional for the things that happened. He exclaimed that if only the gods’ will have not . been bad and if only they have not been ‘ fooled, then they must have obstructed that Greek hideout and the Troy would remain.
  14. 14. Continuing with the story, Aeneas narrates that by that time the attention of the Trojans was then caught by a ca tured unknown person who suddenly appeared. his man has his hands tied and was dragged in before the king, Priam. Aeneas said that this was planned by that unknown man, himself, in order to open Tro to the Greeks, and it is what Aeneas called Gree s deceptive arts.
  15. 15. Because of ity for that man after he spoke in a_whimpering and ri htened way, the Trojans let him speak up and exp am for himself. Then the _man, Sinon, started to speak. He said that he_ really is a_ Greek but is an abandoned Greek. He said that he is a relative of Scion of Belus Line who is a much known man who gave commands against the war. Sinon said that he accompanied that man before and, while that man is in power, Ulysses‘ (roman name for 0d sseus) guile and envy placed him to death. After the Sinon ived in sorrow and planned to avenge the death of his companion.
  16. 16. Sinon told the Tro'ans that Ulysses did a lot of things a ainst him an that Ulysses even ursued on having alchas, a seer who foresees even 5, work with him on baiting Sinon. He mentioned that there had been many times when the Greeks planned to withdraw with the war towards Troy but it never happened. By the time the Greeks are about to sail from Troy, the heavy weather at the sea has stopped them, so the greeks sent someone from their group to the oracle of Apollo at Deiphi and they learned that one amon t em must be killed and offered like what they did or their first voyage upon going to Troy.
  17. 17. This news brought gloom and fri ht to every Greek. Then U ysses pulled Calc as out amon them to reveal who among the Greeks need 0 be offered. It turned out that, after ? ten days, it is Sinon who has been designated for the altar and be offered. That has been the reason why Sinon is in Troy. He said that he escaped from that scary moment for him and pleaded the Trojans to have pity on him.
  18. 18. . allowed Sinon a"l'he‘”fi-oyjans, moved by Sinon‘s story and tears, 0 live. They accepted him but he was guestionedabout the true purpose of the horse the reeks have built. In answer to this, Sinon said that the huge horse was made by the Greeks to amend for what Ulysses and Diomedes did to the Palladium which is the v statue of Pallas at her shrine in Troy. It is because, as ' Sinon said, Ulysses and Diomedes stole the Palladium since, according to the oracle, the Tray could not be captured as Ion as the Palladium remained in place. Because of wha they did, Pallas turned a ainst them. Sinon emphasized that this ift must not e violated for that will surely bring death for all the Trojans and their children.
  19. 19. This Trick of Sinon was believed by The Tro1)_jans, and despiTe all The warnings They | goT Tha inside The horse are Greeks T e sTil broughT The horse inside The walls of roy. Then aT nighT, The horse emiTTed The Greeks. IT is said‘ ThaT Aeneas and his men foughT againsT Their enemies in fierce spi, riT, buT his rage increased when he saw Helen, The woman he blames for The war. Aeneas aTTempTed To kill her buT was calmed by his moTher.
  20. 20. . reTurne Togflher wiTh his family, Aeneas ome ouT of The ciTy of Troy. UnforTun'aTely, Aeneas' wife, Creusa, was losT and died on T eir way ouT. The spiriT of Creusa appeared To Aeneas and she ur ed him noT To » mourn her. She Told him abouT he prophecy ' ThaT There will bepeace and kin dam awaiTmg o for him. Then, he und a crow of refu ees who are waiTing To be lead To safeTy by im, and Aeneas courage did.
  21. 21. ’?3§T3+ ?3i~3~«i3i"i’? '3‘°3l*"i-% '33?? ? £§ifi§: fit$? §«%? i~3 M '? §§; fE 3&3? 11 9? fififilflifi ° Aeneas * Cupid. ° Queen Dido ° Uiiysses ~ Laocoon. ‘ Sinon
  22. 22. Cupid . The charader described in Book II as The one who aTTended Th BanqueT wiTh Aeneas and while disguising as Aeneas' son, caused Queen Dido fall in love wiTh Aeneas 3 Queen Dido Queen Dido is described in Book II as The Queen of Carfhage who fell in love wiTh Aeneas and The one who holds a ceremonial dinner where he asked Aeneas Tell The fall of Troy
  23. 23. Ulysses Also known as Odysseus. He is The King of IThaca and a Greek warrior. He is ofTen menTioned in The Book II and and described by Sinon as The one who, TogeTher wiTh Diomedes, sTole The Palladium, sTole The Palladian (one sTaTue of Pallas in Troy) Laocoon The Trojan PriesT of God NepTune who warned The Trojan people regarding The huge horse made up of Timber
  24. 24. Sinon The lying Greek who had been The reason why The Greeks won over Troy. He serves as The anTagonisT in Book II. Aeneas The main characTer in Aeneid. He is The Trojan prince and The proTagonisT of The sTory which can be considered a hero for he had quesT or mission To be accomplished in The sTory.
  25. 25. §*§T'i’£¥€§ i ii . J‘! &'jII. . . . - TIME - In The afTermaTh A I of The Trojan War, I abouT1000 B. C. V . i’ ‘V’ . . ‘ Q‘ "I u T"‘ ' i . 5 ', . , -~". ." “. . - , 7-". s . l ’ ' PLACE -Car'Thage ! .
  26. 26. PBHJT fl}? ‘VIEW 1", #'%‘V‘: I 3' 9 ran iii: ‘*7 . - ‘ Virgil's PoinT of view - In The epic, Virgil's poinT of view is OmniscienT - Third person poinT of view because he seemed To be all-knowing considering ThaT he knows The ThoughTs of characTers and even of The gods. Aeneas’ PoinT of view - The book II of Aenid is dominaTed by Aeneas' T! narraTion of The fall of Troy. In This aspecT we I. .l i_ can say ThaT it is in The fii~sT person _. lnT of view.
  27. 27. I '1 - The way in which Virgil arranges and expresses The ideas in The Aeneid is foreshadow/ 'n_q. IT is because Virgil provided imporTanT hinTs , Through prophecies and dreams To prepare ll readers for whaT is To happen nexT in The sTory.
  28. 28. 7, THE Lei-«ievtigz QR‘ - h as DT5'§’f1?§«i) 42?? TH E3091 11 .3;? ?”AEHEm‘2‘ wgs Y? ‘.P''‘‘‘*‘-l‘l'’'‘lT. ‘’$'‘'L. ) ~--. --»«: ‘ ~»qp! ri'-9.. “ll ' "’-*~’ ‘ - The level of dicTion used in The Book II of The Aeneid can be considered as formal level of diction. - IT is because This work made use of elaboraTed '4 ‘and complex senTences. IT conTains learned and eleganT vocabulary. A . - IT doesn'T conTain shorTened word forms and _ , ! incompleTe senTences. J ~ l”. V wngrrzs --1"
  29. 29. IT is also evidenT ThaT Virgil made use of poeTic dicTion in This epic poem. Meaning, if made use of complex language ThaT Tells someThing deeper Than surface meaning. One proof of This is The use of figures of speech in The sTory. Some examples of The use figures of speech in Book II of Aeneid are The following:
  30. 30. ° Hyperbole - a sTaTemenT generally exaggeraTed for an aesTheTic purpose. "Enormous, Though, he made Them, build The Thing wifh Timber braces Towering To The sky. .. ” Apos‘Trophe- words are addressed To a person or Thing ThaT is absenT, yeT, as if presenT. "Oh ci7‘ao’e/ of Priam, fowering sfi/ /I”
  31. 31. - I Rhetorical Qn'esTion- a figure of speech in The form of que_sflnn«ThaT is asked in order To make a point raTher Than1_o’e| iciT an answer. "0 my people, Men of Troy, what madness has come over you? Can you believe the enemy is truly gone? A gift from Danaans, and no ruse? I: that U/ yes. s'es' way, as you have known him? ” Simi| e- comparison using like, as, eTc. ". .. a horse of timber as tall as a hil "
  32. 32. WHAT gigs SYgif£BOL§ osggf THE B36312 as “$57,? 3'3‘ J"'h"T Assam‘? . lI"‘I“ vs. ‘ . +.. .M*aiL'. .: "W‘ ‘fir = 3- . ' Ill nui. ... ... “ X. ..‘ -. . 4" fl; , The following symbols can be said To have enriched & elaboraTed The meaning of The sTory if iTs 'darbheTypal meaning would be considered:
  33. 33. 5Torm - ". ..sTorm sTirred up by jealous Juno. .." - signifies The rage of The goddess. Roman myThology believed ThaT gods (Si goddesses inTervene wiTh lives of The morTal. - weaTher also generally symbolizes and expresses The will of The gods and goddesses NighT - ". ..now, Too, The nighT is well long. .." - iT is used To represenTs darker which sTands for melancholy or sadness. IT is used To emphasis The sorrow of Aeneas.
  34. 34. White -3’. .. is whiTe bands I wore as one chosen for ' sacrifice. .." - inl; .n¥’egaTive aspecT, whiTe may repr-esenT death. In here, iT shows deaTh in store for sacrificial vicTlm who wear The whiTe band. 7 Blood - ". .. now The Dardanians will have my blood? " C — blood here represenTs life of The speaker Cloud - ". .. and I lived on, buT under a cloud, in sorrow. .." - in The book, cloud is used as a symbol To represenT sadness for cloud archeTypal| y means gloom.
  35. 35. , There are also archefypes in characTers i‘ . . l seen in This sTory
  36. 36. The Hero - Aeneas - he is the character in the story who exhibits goodness and has mission & struggling story. The Mentor - Laocoon - his task in the story is to give protection 6: wise advice for the people of Troy.
  37. 37. mm Aim fisaas avmisfl Mme’? is wags?
  38. 38. Greeks and Romans’ culture of practicing their religion through sacrifice, regular prayers, and rituals is reflected in the story. This can be seen when Greeks in the story were said to have been asked for sacrificing one of their members for a safe voyage. The character of Aeneas reflects the most respected Roman virtues which can be seen in his courageous. .act as ‘leader and his devotion to duty and his people. The holy shrine of Pallas may also represent Roman culture of having a household shrine in each home where prayers and Iibations to deities were offered.
  39. 39. - Ancient Greeks and Romans were very religious that they worshipped gods and goddesses. Worshipping of Rome's 12 Goods: Jupiter, Juno, Minerva, Vesta, Ceres, Diana, Venus, Mars, Mercurius, Neptunus, Volcanus, and Apollo is seen in Book II as some of these gods and goddesses were mentioned in the story (e. g. Juno, Venus, Neptune)
  40. 40. '§3E.9.. §§ Ii- l .1 The central or dominant idea of the Aeneid's , Book II is the reason for the defeaf or struggling of a kingdom, specifically the ' V kingdom of Troy. 4‘A ». ’i
  41. 41. §? "“i? §:. ¥§'§ Ii- Man vs . Man Trojans Vs. Gneeks G‘ The conflict of the Book II of the Aeneid can be 4 seen in the part where the Trojan people is . having a problem on what to do with the huge if horse of timber made by the Greeks. The conflict worsens when Simon appeared and . », starts his dramatic lie. i
  42. 42. Eiiiiéfififii fit fiiifi §'m%5§ What does the Book II of Aeneid. teach us?
  43. 43. We”, the reporters, believe that this ’ particular book of The Aeneid tries to tell us that we must be very careful with easily 1 trusting people we don't knew very well. It ' even reminded us of the concept of 'Luha ng Buwaya' which is an idiom we're very much familiar with.
  44. 44. Another lesson of this story is that ‘ we must remember that a fall or a failure in people's life is just a door for something I better to come. It's just like what ‘ happened in the story. The fall of Troy even gives way for Aeneas to lead the Roman people afterwards.
  45. 45. This story on the hook ll of Aeneid doesn't just help us understand the life of the mentioned characters. It may also he used _ for us to reflect on our own decisions and stories as well. ‘i . ‘. . . ' TA- V ( v-n . ‘
  46. 46. -—--‘ii _. ... _ We recommend you to read not just this particular book but the other books of the Aenid too. Enjoy reading l
  47. 47. References hit j_)i. »"/ ’‘. ZlllClClIl-lll€fiIl1lfC. C0ll1/ romc. html hit 3:1‘/ xx ''. slnnoo ). coiii/ nielii/ s'i11bolisni-imaeerxzliiml l1tt): i~’/ c11.'iki aedin. or<'/ 'iki/ Viririlhtt )2./ "/‘''. l)l‘lIZll111lC£1.COl11/EBCl1CCl{€Cl/ [O ic/6 29832/Viruil/2-14-l‘)/ Liicr: m'- ciireerliti )2// n''. )oeis. oru/ )oeisor2.«’ tle. htni1 Joel. /Vii‘uillitt )2// 1'‘. Sllll1OO ). co1n/ neiieicl. /ii litt )2// mmzsliinoo 3.coin/ zicncid/ "citrc. html hit )1.»“’. /xumxciwstnIiiiks. coin/ romcculturc. liiinl hit 3:/ /‘m‘. s arknotes. com/ lit/ zieneicl/ section2.rhin1l il| ‘l{llOlCS. COll1/lll/ '1lCllCl(l/ '1llC|1]CS. html hit 3:/ .»’ mxxcn sialinks. com/ $lI‘€Cl’Cllllll1'€. l1ll11l I/ /f1lClIll'. ex su. eclu/ ebsterm/ neneicl. hint htt )1// mmxs )zii‘l<iiotcs. coin/ lit/ iicitcid/ scctioiil. rhtml hit )1 . «‘’/ 'nm: 5 '5 1, ~Z~ Vitorio. M. M.. et. El. 2008 . En0lisl1Ti1ne III Work text for Enolish. ‘F Philippines: Educational Resources Co1'poration. Pjg. 16-18. 186-187. '1! ~i~ Moorings: Readings in World Liter: -1tu1'c l
  48. 48. Submitt -. Adotto, Kea E Mas, Iodelyn S. Ba. l<1ao, t(asandra Ctaudine G. N-8BEEd

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