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LOST   FOUND  Transitioning from the Street into Permanent Housing                              Degree Project by Kara Dzi...
table of contents 2   statement 4   a way of working 6   the breakdown 7   resources 9   shelter15   precedent studies23  ...
1
statement         In the past year, over 4300 people were seeking shelter in Rhode Island. 20% of these people are conside...
“There is no system that has existed    to intentionally move people from    homelessness into housing. The    problem isn...
a way of working            My degree project addresses an issue that is real. It is also dealing with an issue that I am ...
5 the breakdown
RHODE ISLAND has the second largest percentage                           of homeless individuals in the country4340 people...
This diagram shows how most of the resources that are currently available for      homeless individuals, including shelter...
shelter    The existing shelters are inadequate for the current amount of    homeless people in R.I. This is apparent in t...
shelter   10
11 shelter
Harrington Hall is Rhode Island’s largest homelessshelter. It has enough beds for 88 men, but because of theabundance of h...
13 shelter
If an ignorant city dweller were an architect for a day, and they were asked to builda shelter, they would most likely bui...
15 precedent studies
DIGNIT Y   JOAN KROC   ANDREWS   BEB   SITEVILL AGE     CENTER     HOUSE                                       precedent s...
joan kroc center     St. Vincent de Paul Village, San Diego, since 1987     Cost of construction: $11 million     Size: 11...
housingprogramming spacegreen space                    precedent studies   18
“The goal is to essentially                                                                                   reinvent the...
146 short-term living units                            19,750 square foot building - 6 floors                            O...
dignity village     Outside of Portland, OR                                                                               ...
precedent studies   22
SUPERFUND SITE                JANUARY 2009                                               AUGUST 2009                      ...
“This odd collection of people,living on the fringe, have chosen totake their chances as a loose clanoperating with few ru...
25 trying to find a way
Comment from the Providence Journal article,“Camp Runamuck residents head to new camps”12:05 PM on September 8, 2009I don’...
27 trying to find a way
Richard and Shirley were the first “homeless” people that I met in Providence. I put homeless in quotationsbecause althoug...
the guys                          They told me to show up at the Mathewson St Church at 4 pm if I wanted to help with the ...
Then there was Don Ronaldo, aka Ronald. I started calling him “Origami Master” once Irealized his skill. When I went to th...
31 trying to find a way
ou t r e achBefore leaving the church, I was fortunate to meet Megan Smith, a 22 year old girl who graduated from Brown Un...
33 the project
unconventionalshelters           the project   34
“There are some people     The Jewelry District is an area of Providence which for a long time has    that have fallen thr...
the project   36
t he f acili t y37 the project
t h e h o m eb oxSite: “Box Spots” around Downtown ProvidenceCommunity: The vulnerable, the hidden, the disconnected, the ...
full scale explorations                             1   Alex often sat at one of the benches at the                       ...
2   The idea of this chair design was    flexibility and user initiation. When    not in use, the chair can be propped    ...
3 portable        cardboard              bed41 full scale explorations
The design of the portable cardboard bed is a response tothe 282 people who were without a bed to sleep on in theshelters ...
3               2                 143 full scale explorations
full scale explorations   44
cardboard tectonics                             How do I make a system that is                ?                           ...
full scale explorations   42                          46
47 full scale explorations
This system was designed in order totest cardboard’s structural qualitiesthrough means of triangulation.However, what was ...
transparent joinery                             The aim for the joinery to be both visible                             and...
accumulation   Once the frame is attached to the existing infrastructure,               cardboard would then be collected ...
INTERVENTION [1]     The site is located in the open air     staircase platform of The Arcade, located     downtown on Wey...
intervention [1]   52
iteration #253 intervention [1]
full scale explorations        intervention [1]   42                           54
frame      iteration #355 intervention [1]
dependenceaccumulation full scale explorations         intervention [1]   42                            56
INTERVENTION [2]     The site is located in the open air     staircase platform of The Arcade, located     downtown on Wey...
full scale explorations       intervention [2]   42                          58
INTERVENTION [3]      The site is the stairwell into the basement of      the Armenian Church on Broad St. The unique     ...
full scale explorations       intervention [3]   42                          60
61
full scale explorationsfull scale construction    42                           62
the facility          The concept for the facility is that it works          as a flexible framework, allowing for        ...
full scale explorations             the facility   42                            64
housing                 PLAN OF TWO UNITS65 housing
SECTION OF TWO UNITS   full scale explorations                  housing    42                             66
67 housing
full scale explorations               housing    42                          68
Objects arranged and       photographed by Carl Dunn,     homeless artist, Providence, RI69
conclusion       The approach that I had taken for this project was one of multiple perspectives- the homeless, the advoca...
a little extra...                                                                       song by kara and sam dziobek      ...
b ib lio g r ap h yBell, Bryan, and Katie Wakeford. Expanding Architecture: Design as Activism. New York: Metropolis, 2008...
Lost + Found : Transitioning from the Street into Permanent Housing - Degree Project Book by Kara Dziobek
Lost + Found : Transitioning from the Street into Permanent Housing - Degree Project Book by Kara Dziobek
Lost + Found : Transitioning from the Street into Permanent Housing - Degree Project Book by Kara Dziobek
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Lost + Found : Transitioning from the Street into Permanent Housing - Degree Project Book by Kara Dziobek

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Lost + Found : Transitioning from the Street into Permanent Housing - Degree Project Book by Kara Dziobek

  1. 1. LOST FOUND Transitioning from the Street into Permanent Housing Degree Project by Kara Dziobek
  2. 2. table of contents 2 statement 4 a way of working 6 the breakdown 7 resources 9 shelter15 precedent studies23 trying to find a way34 unconventional shelters35 the project39 full scale explorations51 intervention [1]57 intervention [2]59 intervention [3]61 full scale construction63 the facility65 housing70 conclusion71 a little extra72 bibliography
  3. 3. 1
  4. 4. statement In the past year, over 4300 people were seeking shelter in Rhode Island. 20% of these people are consideredchronically homeless, meaning that they have either been homeless for over a year, or repeatly homeless for anextended period of time. The organizations that currently exist, in addition to being over capacity, are not functioningfor at least 860 people, and could even be considered ways in which homelessness is perpetuated. Through volunteering with advocates doing outreach at night, while developing relationships with the guysat the Mathewson Street Church emergency shelter, I learned that there were some men who would rather stay outin the cold than enter into a shelter, and others who had a permanent apartment, yet they were still showing up atthe shelter because where they were living felt too isolated. As a response, this project serves as a transitional tool, assisting people from the street into permanenthousing. The project moves from the scale of individual interventions that depend on existing infrastructures inProvidence, RI, to a permanent supportive housing facility located in the Jewelry District. The facility provides amore sustaining framework that can accommodate for various spaces of function, resource, and community. statement 2
  5. 5. “There is no system that has existed to intentionally move people from homelessness into housing. The problem isn’t that hard to solve, but the connective tissue to make it happen has been missing.” -Rosanne Haggerty, founder of Common Ground3
  6. 6. a way of working My degree project addresses an issue that is real. It is also dealing with an issue that I am very passionate about.It is an opportunity to invest time into a group of people that I can really attach myself to and feel as if the work I’m doingcan make a difference in people’s lives, not just through design, but by getting to know people and listening to their stories.It is a social project deeply influenced by homeless individual’s struggles and triumphs. The community is one that is localand accessible, which allows for a close and trusting relationship to form between myself and the community. My project is an argument, and with every argument there is an opinion involved. Many times, only when theopinion is backed up on facts is it deemed as valid. I intend to construct an argument, not in a way that poses a right anda wrong answer, but asks questions, allowing for people to find the answer for themselves. I intend to looks at the situationfrom all angles, broadening my perspective. It is approached from all sides, in hopes of creating something that works fromthe bottom up. It should be a series of challenges where each one begins to shape the project closer and closer to a justifiedbelief. During Wintersession, the weeks are broken into four categories (ignorant city dweller, fifth year architecture student,urban planner, and the homeless individual). Mark Jarzombek writes that a degree project is “not a mere explanation ofarchitecture but an expression (both negative and positive) of architecture’s disciplinary fluidity and uncertainty.” I believea degree project should be a humbling experience where the final product is unknown with the emphasis on the process. There are two ways to make change—removing yourself completely from the system, or working within thesystem. The latter is of course more difficult, but I believe it to be the only way to design something that could function in away that benefits the group of people I am focusing on. The process will be a continuous back and forth between the up-close and personal accounts given to me by the people that I will get to know, and a broader, more overall perspective thattakes into account the larger scale impact, which includes the social, political, and economical implications. I seek to create a project that challenges the traditional thinking of the maker, the group of people it is directlyaddressing, and the audience. It spurs on thinking for the present, reevaluates the future, and holds the past accountable. Iwant the work to be the beginning of an investigation that will hopefully continue with me after graduation. At the end of theday, I want to leave a lesson, not a project. a way of working 4
  7. 7. 5 the breakdown
  8. 8. RHODE ISLAND has the second largest percentage of homeless individuals in the country4340 people are currently seeking shelter in RI1408 people used the shelters in 201020% of the homeless population in RI is chronically homeless (homeless for over a year)61% of homeless people are single adultsIt is cheaper to have people live in affordable housing than to stay in a shelter80% of chronically homeless are able to retain housing once placed into it through HousingFirst programsHOWEVER,many of the individuals in Providence that have housing still come to the emergency shelters the breakdown 6
  9. 9. This diagram shows how most of the resources that are currently available for homeless individuals, including shelters, meal sites, and medical services, are located outside of Providence. The project site would serve as a hub to connect all of the existing resources, while bringing the people using the resources back into Downtown Providence, which is where many homeless people end up because it’s where major resources are located like Kennedy Plaza (public transportation), Mathewson Street Church (homeless community events) and Housing Assistance.7 resources
  10. 10. shelter The existing shelters are inadequate for the current amount of homeless people in R.I. This is apparent in the need for the emergency shelters that exist. However, the one shelter that exists downtown at Mathewson Street Church is scheduled to close in April. The 21 men who usually stay there are the ones who haven’t fit into the other shelters, and were either sleeping outside during the summer or found sleeping outside recently. They are the ones who have fallen through the cracks. A problem that occurs with many of the shelters is that in order to reserve a spot, it is necessary to line up in the afternoon, so if the shelter doesn’t serve dinner, then they are unable to eat that night. In addition, most shelters kick everyone out by 7 a.m., leaving the people to wander around, either searching for soup kitchens or attempting to meet with their case worker. Problems arise when their shelter is not in Providence, where they need to find transportation to if they want to do anything productive. Without a bus ticket, some are forced to walk. The distance from Cranston to downtown Providence is 6.6 mi (a 2.5 hr walk.) ON APRIL 15 ALL THREE EMERGENCY SHELTERS WILL CLOSE DUE TO LACK OF FUNDING. EACH SHELTER HOLDS 21-40 PEOPLE PER NIGHT. THE AVERAGE NIGHTLY TEMPERATURE ON MAY 1ST IS 44 DEGREES. HYPOTHERMIA CAN OCCUR BETWEEN 40 AND 50 DEGREES.9 shelter
  11. 11. shelter 10
  12. 12. 11 shelter
  13. 13. Harrington Hall is Rhode Island’s largest homelessshelter. It has enough beds for 88 men, but because of theabundance of homeless men who need a space to stay, there are nightswhere the shelter holds 130 men. Although there aren’t enough beds,the men will sleep on chairs or on the stage area.Recently, the conditions of the shelter were brought to the attention ofthe Senator and he forced them to fix it up. Since then, there have beenmajor improvements with the beds and the bathroom conditions.The space for Harrington Hall, along with most shelters, is made to fitinside an existing building that used to have a different program, oftenan institutional one. The beds are all located in one large room wherethere is no privacy, no dignity, and no individuality. shelter 12
  14. 14. 13 shelter
  15. 15. If an ignorant city dweller were an architect for a day, and they were asked to builda shelter, they would most likely build it in the outskirts of the city. The followingrenderings negate this idea and place an emergency shelter in a location thatis very centralized in Providence where it would be seen by many people. Theyserve as visual commentaries on this idea and the negative stigma that manypeople have towards homeless people that they are less than average, and thatit’s fine to treat them like animals. If the amount of privacy granted to someone isan indicator of their social status, then the “glass box” not only dehumanizes theinhabitants, but also makes everyone aware of the severity of the problem andhow many people aren’t being provided for. shelter 14
  16. 16. 15 precedent studies
  17. 17. DIGNIT Y JOAN KROC ANDREWS BEB SITEVILL AGE CENTER HOUSE precedent studies 16
  18. 18. joan kroc center St. Vincent de Paul Village, San Diego, since 1987 Cost of construction: $11 million Size: 110,000 sq. feet Prototype for agency-based “continuum of care” centers across the nation (all necessities located on one site) An average of 313 family members and single women receive transitional housing each night Approximately 160 children are housed nightly with their families 1,400 daily meals served to residents on average Security staff and cameras in public areas provide secure environment 24 hours a day Day Center provides showers to non-residents seven days a week Residential and commercial laundries, non-denominational chapel, and community meeting space ORGANIZATION’S SUCCESS RATE (Ability to find employment and transition into permanent housing) Families with children 91% Single men 54% Single women 49%17 precedent studies
  19. 19. housingprogramming spacegreen space precedent studies 18
  20. 20. “The goal is to essentially reinvent the lodging house as an alternative to public shelters and life on the street for those who have been homeless for long periods and are trying to reenter the housing market.” -Rosanne Haggerty, founder of Common Ground the andrews house 197 Bowery St, Lower Manhattan, NY Design competition launched by Common Ground in 2003 to design 19 prefabricated “individual dwelling units” on one floor of the house without altering the building’s structure, walls, or systems. The final design is a combination of both “Kit of Parts” and “The Ordering of Things” Design based on the input of over 200 homeless individuals 9’ x 6 ½’ x 7’ high interior dwelling unit accommodates a bed, a workspace, storage and entry 38 units reserved for homeless veterans For $7 a night, homeless guests may, with minimal screening, occupy a unit for up to 21 days. The program will offer services such as linkages to housing and employment resources, medical help and substance abuse treatment for those who choose to use them. “HOUSING FIRST” AVERAGE SUCCESS RATE 80% retention rate in housing over a two-year period19 precedent studies
  21. 21. 146 short-term living units 19,750 square foot building - 6 floors Option of linking multiple unitsSOFT HOUSEanother competition entry precedent studies 20
  22. 22. dignity village Outside of Portland, OR “Street homeless want City-recognized encampment of about 60 people small, loose, and informal social networks.” Self-sustaining, empowering, promotes individuality and community Registered non-profit with website All 50 individual/family structures at Dignity Village are code-compliant 10’x10’ houses made of recycled materials21 precedent studies
  23. 23. precedent studies 22
  24. 24. SUPERFUND SITE JANUARY 2009 AUGUST 2009 OCTOBER 2009HOPE CITY CRAWFORD STREET BRIDGE SUPERFUND SITE, CUMBERLANDCAMP RUNAMUCK ROGER WILLIAMS MEMORIAL PARK COLLIER PARK 195 BRIDGE, E. PROVIDENCE PLEASANT VALLEY PARKWAY 55 BROAD ST, PAWTUCKET END OF HOUGHTON STREET, PROVIDENCE/N. PROVIDENCEPROVITENTS EMPTY LOT ON WESTMINSTER STREET 55 BROAD ST HOUGHTON ST PLEASANT VALLEY PKWY ROGER WILLIAMS MEMORIAL PARK WESTMINSTER ST CRAWFORD STREET BRIDGE ABORTIVE (TENTS NEVER SET UP 195 BRIDGE, E. PROVIDENCE OR ONLY FOR A SHORT TIME) COLLIER PARK MOVE NOT MADE AS A GROUP23 trying to find a way
  25. 25. “This odd collection of people,living on the fringe, have chosen totake their chances as a loose clanoperating with few rules. Thereseems to be a level of securitygained by the power in numbersand the watchful eyes of the overallgroup. ‘It’s simple. We take care ofeach other,’ says Kalil.” t he t en t ci t ie s In 2009, the lack of space in the shelters resulted in many homeless people were sleeping on the streets and the conditions were very dangerous. Megan Smith, a student from Brown, and John Joyce, an activist and at the time homeless, and a group of about 30 homeless people agreed that it was safer together than alone. They decided to take over an area of Providence that would hopefully raise awareness of the situation and result in action taken by the city. However, the anticipated temporary camp site, turned into a ten month long fight for housing. Over this span of time, the “tent cities” evolved into three different communities, Hope City, Camp Runamuck, and Provitents. trying to find a way 24
  26. 26. 25 trying to find a way
  27. 27. Comment from the Providence Journal article,“Camp Runamuck residents head to new camps”12:05 PM on September 8, 2009I don’t live in any of the tent site but I am in the samepredicament. I am going to get my GED soon at theProvidence Skills Center soon but still I wonder... Howdo I present myself when I cannot afford to leave mypossessions anywhere? How can I be presentable whenI can’t get proper sleep? Should I lie awake in Crossroadsand hope the rumor of bed bugs is untrue? What if it’s not?Should I cuddle with my possessions in Urban League withhopes that my presence will not encourage someone tonotice I’m afraid of the physical violence I hear so muchabout from actual clients there? Should I lie awake in theProvidence Mission in hopes that the windowless roomdoes not infect me with other peoples unfortunate sickness?I wonder which unkempt person carries bed bugs, lice,pneumonia or bronchitis... I WANT HELP It’s harder to findthan the middle class/upper class assumes. Come to mylevel. I made mistakes just as every human has but doesthat mean I deserve all of my struggles? trying to find a way 26
  28. 28. 27 trying to find a way
  29. 29. Richard and Shirley were the first “homeless” people that I met in Providence. I put homeless in quotationsbecause although according to our society they might be considered this, their way of living is actuallyquite amazing. Nested in the one patch of bamboo within the Jewelry District, this couple has made theirsecond attempt of a home (the first one was burnt down by someone). I wasn’t able to go inside becauseit was “too messy” but it was quite visible the innovation that was put into the design. Their shack is madecompletely from found doors and windows. Above shows the skylight for their bedroom (what was once aset of french doors).They liked being hidden. Just because one’s way of living doesn’t fit into societal norms, doesn’t mean thatone’s standards aren’t the same as anyone else. Everyone needs privacy, and they sought it out. They weredreading the winter season and anticipated the growth of the bamboo which was only lush in the warmermonths. They were also starting to have problems with water leaking in through the cracks (due to the oldcalking that Richard has used to seal the edges).During our last conversation in November, Shirley was planning on moving in with her sister in Cape Cod,so that she wouldn’t be outside for the winter months. Richard was going to get help to better insulate theirshack. However, I was told that Shirley is still around. Richard was seen outside a restaurant while he waitedfor Shirley to finish cleaning dishes for extra cash.They are a team. They are each other’s community. trying to find a way 28
  30. 30. the guys They told me to show up at the Mathewson St Church at 4 pm if I wanted to help with the meal. Arriving at the doors of the church, I ran into two women dropping off blankets. To my surprise, a woman in the church turned the blankets away, saying that they need them at the shelter in Pawtucket, not there. I thought this could be because they are located in the city where there is a larger surplus of donations. There was also a man named Carl who was at the door and when he found out that I went to RISD he told me that he used to lecture there. He went to school at Parsons for Illustration and loves to draw architecture. He was very articulate and very smart. Talking to him emphasized the fact that homelessness can happen to anyone. Serving food and drinks was very chaotic. There were people shouting out things from all sides of the room. Many people had specific things that they wanted. They knew what they wanted. I made sure to remember everyone’s requests. There was one woman who asked if she could get four packets of sugar. Her hands were shaking as she spoke. A young couple sat at the end of the table. “Are you guys boyfriend and girlfriend?” I asked them. They told me they were and that the girl is 18 and the guy is 28. I wondered what their story was, but part of me felt like I could figure it out. There was one guy who kept cracking jokes the whole time. His positive attitude and laughter was contagious. One man by the name of William kept speaking to me in Spanish once he realized I could understand him. He would switch back in forth, telling me that he doesn’t speak English very well, and that he taught himself. He is originally from the Dominican Republic and after moving to the States, his wife died and he had no way of income, resulting in the loss of his house. After things calmed down and everyone was served, I went and sat down with a man named Tommy. He seemed to know everyone around him very well, especially “Sarge.” “He really loves women. If he tries telling you that you’re beautiful and all that, don’t listen to him. He tells that to every girl.” He started telling me how he went to CCRI for five years where he took all different types of classes from psychology to music to history. He stays at the church but is well aware of all of the other shelters around. He started going down the list. “Then you have Crossroads—that place is a zoo. Everyone knows that.” I spotted Carl going to leave so I called him over. He has been staying at the church at night as well. “I sleep on the stage right over there.” This is his first time being homeless. His illustrations have even been in many different publications, including The New Yorker. He told me about an opportunity that he had to show his work at AS220, but it was right at the point when he became homeless. He had to turn the offer down with the hope of getting the chance again once he gets back on his feet. He has a goal.29 trying to find a way
  31. 31. Then there was Don Ronaldo, aka Ronald. I started calling him “Origami Master” once Irealized his skill. When I went to their table to serve them, he had made an origami flowerout of his paper place mat. When I complimented him on it, he ended up giving it to me. Itold him that he should make more, but he didn’t have any more paper, so after a little whilepassed, I brought him three more sheets. After everyone had finished eating and peoplewere clearing out, Don Ronaldo was still sitting at the head of the table, making sure to foldeach part of the flower perfectly. He was making one for each of the volunteers. “It’s alwaysgood to make someone happy.” As I ate my dinner, Don Ronaldo carefully taught me how tomake one. “Can you learn by watching?” He was a really good teacher. “It’s all repetitive.”He’s been living out of his car for over a year and would prefer it over a shelter, any day.“They’re horrible—they have bedbugs, cockroaches, and junkies.” No one working at ashelter would ever tell me these things. He had very negative opinions of the governmentand Obama, thinking that they desire for there to be people who are poor. Maybe he wasright. However, one must admit that they need help in order to improvetheir life.The room was filled with so much potential . Even if it wasn’t what our society mightconsider valuable skills, each person was unique in their own way, and had something tocontribute to the rest of the world. There was everything from comedians to artists to poetsto translators. They were inspiring. trying to find a way 30
  32. 32. 31 trying to find a way
  33. 33. ou t r e achBefore leaving the church, I was fortunate to meet Megan Smith, a 22 year old girl who graduated from Brown Universitylast year. She was now working at Access RI and was the coordinator of the emergency shelter at the church. She asked ifI wanted to come with her to do outreach, which meant walking around the city looking for people who were planning onsleeping outside and offering them a spot in the church. We split up, the two of us walking along the river and the other guy,Tom, walking around downtown. They seemed to have a good idea of where people tend to set up, and the snow also madeit easy to track random paths to places that were unknown.For a moment I wanted to complain because of how cold I was. But then I remembered that there are some people whoare going to be out in this the whole night. Snow covered the sidewalks, making the width of the road only wide enough forone car’s width to barely pass. We climbed over the snow that had built up on the side and then over the barricade. Meganyells towards the water and through the columns, “Donnell, it’s Megan. Are you down there?” He yelled back and as we gotcloser, I saw that he was wrapped in sleeping bags like a ((cocoon)) . “When you come out of there, you’ll be sproutingwings!” Megan joked with him. “This place will soon be gone… they’re tearing it down soon.” “You were here first! Squatter’srights!” We all laughed. She told him that there’s room at the shelter if he wanted to come, but he was content for the night.“I’ll probably come by tomorrow when it gets colder.” Being able to turn down an offer is empowering in itself.Megan knows everyone’s names and their stories and they know who she is, too. When she was still in school, she wouldbring the guys to her dorm to shower really late at night or really early in the morning when no students were in there. “Ionly break the rules if it’s for the good of humanity.” One night she brought back two guys and the next morning therewere Public Safety alerts everywhere warning about two men that had been seen in the building. Oops. Now she lives in anapartment where she is free to bring back whoever she wants, although she told me her landlord probably thinks she’s alittle strange to always be bringing back these random men. trying to find a way 32
  34. 34. 33 the project
  35. 35. unconventionalshelters the project 34
  36. 36. “There are some people The Jewelry District is an area of Providence which for a long time has that have fallen through the been disconnected from the rest of Downtown because of the highway, I-95, running between the two areas. With the highway now being cracks and don’t know how removed, there is the opportunity to connect these two areas, allowing for revitalization for both. to get back up. They don’t Having the facility located within the Jewelry District, it can serve as want a hand out, they want both a way to reconnect the neighborhood to downtown and a way to reconnect the group of people back into society. a way out.” -Don Ronaldo35 the project
  37. 37. the project 36
  38. 38. t he f acili t y37 the project
  39. 39. t h e h o m eb oxSite: “Box Spots” around Downtown ProvidenceCommunity: The vulnerable, the hidden, the disconnected, the outcasts, the stubborn, the homelessMost people who find themselves homeless, don’t want to be there. There are two things that can happen- (1) a person is inthat situation for so long that they don’t know how to get out of it, or (2) they don’t know how to get out of it so they end upbeing on a continuous cycle of homelessness. This project aims to prevent both of these scenarios from happening.This project works on two scales- the individual and the community. If someone has been homeless for a long period oftime, the “home box” serves as a transition from the streets to living indoors. The home box is custom built for the individual,depending on their site, and once they have taken ownership over their box, they can bring it to the facility in the JewelryDistrict where they can install their box as furniture in their room and live within permanent supportive housing. The facilitycontains wrap-services to assist the individual towards a more independent life. the project 38
  40. 40. full scale explorations 1 Alex often sat at one of the benches at the Memorial Park on South Main St. During our first conversation, he told me that he wanted to go to the shelter in Cranston but they wouldn’t let him on the bus because he smelt too bad. A little counter- intuitive in my opinion. This raised awareness to the fact that there is no public shower facility, except for at Crossroads, but the wait is very long. He is now staying at the emergency shelter at Mathewson Street Church. Everyone has a need for privacy, especially in moments of bathing. Is there a way to design a transportable private space to bathe that could capture, store, and warm up water? The models to the right are explorations of tectonics that could serve as a hybrid between an umbrella and a hood, storing rainwater for later use.39 full scale explorations
  41. 41. 2 The idea of this chair design was flexibility and user initiation. When not in use, the chair can be propped up against the wall, and then when needed, it can be folded down to create a chair. The piece can be positioned in a variety of ways. As a chair, it can either use the wall as support or fold over to support itself. In addition, it can be used as a foot rest if placed next to a couch. full scale explorations 40
  42. 42. 3 portable cardboard bed41 full scale explorations
  43. 43. The design of the portable cardboard bed is a response tothe 282 people who were without a bed to sleep on in theshelters in Providence. The amount of people staying inthe shelters is far more than ever before, and as a result,the resources that they have are inadequate. This bedwould allow an individual to be elevated while providingcomfort, and could essentially be made by anyone andused recyclable materials. full scale explorations 42
  44. 44. 3 2 143 full scale explorations
  45. 45. full scale explorations 44
  46. 46. cardboard tectonics How do I make a system that is ? flexible lightweight (portable) made from locally found materials thermally insulative easy to assemble an aperture for light during the day a monolithic wall during the night depending on an existing infrastructure both permanent and fragile45 full scale explorations
  47. 47. full scale explorations 42 46
  48. 48. 47 full scale explorations
  49. 49. This system was designed in order totest cardboard’s structural qualitiesthrough means of triangulation.However, what was realized thatcardboard works best structurallywhen the loads are placed againstthe grain. This system explores the possibility of compression and expansion of a material while still retaining rigidity. full scale explorations 42 48
  50. 50. transparent joinery The aim for the joinery to be both visible and easy to understand goes with the idea that by designing a structure that ideally could be assembled and disassembled by anyone. The beauty is in the process which is celebrated through the transparency of its assembly.49 full scale explorations
  51. 51. accumulation Once the frame is attached to the existing infrastructure, cardboard would then be collected from various locations around the city and used as infill, to both create rigidity and a thermal barrier. An 8” wall that is filled with layered cardboard has an R value of 20 hrxsq.ft.xF/Btu. An average house has an R value between 15 and 20. full scale explorations 42 50
  52. 52. INTERVENTION [1] The site is located in the open air staircase platform of The Arcade, located downtown on Weybosset St, Providence. What made this site stand out from the others was the ground condition, the existing infrastructure, the existing “roof,” and the need for privacy due to the proximity of the street. iteration #151 intervention [1]
  53. 53. intervention [1] 52
  54. 54. iteration #253 intervention [1]
  55. 55. full scale explorations intervention [1] 42 54
  56. 56. frame iteration #355 intervention [1]
  57. 57. dependenceaccumulation full scale explorations intervention [1] 42 56
  58. 58. INTERVENTION [2] The site is located in the open air staircase platform of The Arcade, located downtown on Weybosset St, Providence. What made this site stand out from the others was the overhang, causing the space to very dark. A second system was designed to create a planar surface. In this intervention, the system can be used as a reflective surface during the day, bringing light into the back space, and can be used as a privacy barrier at night, to prevent people from entering into the space.57 intervention [2]
  59. 59. full scale explorations intervention [2] 42 58
  60. 60. INTERVENTION [3] The site is the stairwell into the basement of the Armenian Church on Broad St. The unique thing about this space is that it didn’t have a covering to protect from weather like the other spaces. In this intervention, the wall system was used as a skin, serving as an aperature for light and air, while creating a structure on which a weatherproof material can be placed.59 intervention [3]
  61. 61. full scale explorations intervention [3] 42 60
  62. 62. 61
  63. 63. full scale explorationsfull scale construction 42 62
  64. 64. the facility The concept for the facility is that it works as a flexible framework, allowing for different types of program to occur within the same space. The concept model to the right shows how the form of the building changes once an occupant installs their desired boundaries for their individual living space. The building is essentially made up of three components- frame (steel), permanent structure (concrete), and temporary structure (wood and cardboard). CONCEPT MODEL63 the facility
  65. 65. full scale explorations the facility 42 64
  66. 66. housing PLAN OF TWO UNITS65 housing
  67. 67. SECTION OF TWO UNITS full scale explorations housing 42 66
  68. 68. 67 housing
  69. 69. full scale explorations housing 42 68
  70. 70. Objects arranged and photographed by Carl Dunn, homeless artist, Providence, RI69
  71. 71. conclusion The approach that I had taken for this project was one of multiple perspectives- the homeless, the advocate, andthe architect. By broadening my perspective from the beginning, I was able to challenge my traditional way of thinking andmake more informed decisions. The piles of rocks to the left are each like a homeless individual. Each person has unique characteristics andpersonalities, their own skills and most importantly, a desire to be both private and part of a supportive community. I hopethat through this work, architecture can be further thought of as a medium in which social issues can be addressed andlives can be affected in a positive and sustaining way. What I learned from this process was how important the process is, and how every project needs to be approachedin a unique and varied way. In addition, I learned to not be so heavy handed initially, but instead to approach an issuehumbly and with an open perspective. As architects, we have the ability to creatively dissect a problem and work towards asolution, however, finding the solution is the part that matters most. We must take the time to listen to who it is that we aredesigning for, because it is them who will be inhabiting what we design. I learned to design with a community of people, notjust for them. This project reaffirmed how architecture can play a vital role in the improvement of communities most in need. full scale explorations conclusion 42 70
  72. 72. a little extra... song by kara and sam dziobek Homeless man, would you like some money? (4x) Homeless man---- I would like some money (4x) Verse 1: If you walked life in their shoes Would you live life by the same rules? I doubt it. You’d rather walk on by Turn to the sound of the birds in the sky You got a pocket full of lint Spend before you think You ask yourself where to begin Give. Even if it’s a dollar, next time a brother tries to holler. Give some change to make some change, It’s always better in the sun, than it is in the rain. Be generous and don’t complain I’m telling ya man, it will keep you sane. Chorus: Homeless man---- I would like somebody (4x) Verse 2: I would like somebody To offer more than money If you see me on the street risd talent show, 2011 Why don’t you ask me what my name is? Since when are you so famous? I know that you can change this Challenge yourself to face this We’re in a school of innovation Yet we walk around staring at the pavement I thought we were creative Are we proud to say that we made this? There’s enough for everyone’s need Not enough for everyone’s greed Where’s our love for humanity? For those we try not to see I can’t think of anything witty All I know is that it starts at RISD Chorus71 a little extra
  73. 73. b ib lio g r ap h yBell, Bryan, and Katie Wakeford. Expanding Architecture: Design as Activism. New York: Metropolis, 2008.Bell, Bryan. Good Deeds, Good Design: Community Service through Architecture. New York: Princeton Architectural,2004.Chermayeff, Serge. Community and privacy: Toward a New Architecture of Humanism. Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday,1963.Davis, Sam. Designing for the Homeless: Architecture That Works. Berkeley: University of California, 2004.Fox, Michael, Interactive architecture. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2009.Haas, Tigran. New Urbanism and Beyond: Designing Cities for the Future. New York: Rizzoli, 2008.Katz, Peter. The New Urbanism: Toward an Architecture of Community. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1994.Lepik, Andres. Small Scale, Big Change: New Architectures of Social Engagement. New York: Museum of ModernArt, 2010. Print.Papanek, Victor J. Design for the Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change. Chicago, IL: Academy Chicago,1985.Pilloton, Emily. Design Revolution: 100 Products That Empower People. New York, NY: Metropolis, 2009.Polak, Paul. Out of Poverty: What Works When Traditional Approaches Fail. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler,2008.Serageldin, Ismail. The Architecture of Empowerment: People, Shelter and Livable Cities. London: AcademyEditions, 1997.Sinclair, Cameron. Design Like You Give a Damn: architectural responses to humanitarian crisis. Edited by Architecturefor Humanity. New York, NY: Metropolis Books, 2006.Smith, Cynthia E. Design for the Other 90%. New York: Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, SmithsonianOrganization, 2007.Wu, Rufina and Canham, Stefan. Portraits from Above – Hong Kong’s Informal Rooftop Communities.. DE S IGN C A N L E A D T O A S E N S E OF B E L ON GIN G . bibliography 72

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