Middle Schooling changes for Bluewater State School   Presented by  Miss Kim Morton
Outline   <ul><li>Bluewater State School needs to engage more emotively with the curriculum, bridge the gap between the re...
To address these key areas,  the following  Middle Schooling practices  are suggested: <ul><li>Student Centred Learning  <...
Student Centred Learning   <ul><li>The Middle years want to have a voice, a choice and some control over how and what they...
<ul><li>Engaging </li></ul><ul><li>Task rich </li></ul><ul><li>Use emotional connectedness </li></ul><ul><li>Giving them a...
Collaborative Group Learning <ul><li>Socially the middle years are afraid to look foolish in front of their peers   (NSW D...
<ul><li>       Group work  </li></ul><ul><li>      Independent work </li></ul><ul><li>       Extension activities to...
ICTS in assessments <ul><li>The digital culture that the middle years live in, is all pervasive and invisible because of i...
<ul><li>By incorporating ICT in assessments, the gap between real world and the classroom can be bridged, which will posit...
Classroom Environment   <ul><li>By having different learning areas such as bean bags, books and computer corners, the midd...
Teacher relationships with students   <ul><li>Teachers need to be active listeners, adaptable, tolerating, have a sense of...
<ul><li>By building relationships that are safe, familiar, secure and consistent, academic performance can be addressed fo...
<ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Being consistent </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Nurture social values </li></ul></ul></u...
Transitional Program for  Year 7’s  <ul><li>Transitional programs are designed to give middle years transferring into High...
<ul><li>Tidy trays under the deck taken away and using  school bags </li></ul><ul><li>Homework due at different times </li...
Parents and carers can help create a supportive learning environment for middle years by:   <ul><ul><li>Arranging to meet ...
<ul><li>“ Community based action projects can provide a learning content that reconnects students with school and that con...
Conclusion <ul><li>We at Bluewater State School need to change the way we deal with the middle years so that we can better...
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Middle Schooling changes at Bluewater State School

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Middle Schooling changes at Bluewater State School

  1. 1. Middle Schooling changes for Bluewater State School Presented by Miss Kim Morton
  2. 2. Outline <ul><li>Bluewater State School needs to engage more emotively with the curriculum, bridge the gap between the real world and school, and meet the individual needs of the students. Establishing middle schooling practise will enable students to have more input into what they are studying, use modern technology for assessments, increase emotional connections to course content, use abstract and higher order thinking, use collaborative group work and fosters student centred learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Key areas that need to be addressed in our School are : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>  Raising expectations and achievement for </li></ul></ul><ul><li>grades 5 – 7, </li></ul><ul><ul><li>  Disengagement, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Absenteeism. </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. To address these key areas, the following Middle Schooling practices are suggested: <ul><li>Student Centred Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative Group Learning </li></ul><ul><li>ICTS in assessments </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom Environment </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher relationships with students </li></ul><ul><li>Transitional programs </li></ul>
  4. 4. Student Centred Learning <ul><li>The Middle years want to have a voice, a choice and some control over how and what they are learning (Feinstein, 2007; NSW Department of Education & Training, 2006) . By having a student negotiated curriculum research has proved that they will learn more effectively (Pendergast & Bahr, 2005, p. 164). A student negotiated curriculum, can help to close the gap between school and home, raise expectations, increase academic achievement and target disengagement. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Engaging </li></ul><ul><li>Task rich </li></ul><ul><li>Use emotional connectedness </li></ul><ul><li>Giving them a voice and listening </li></ul><ul><li>Have real world content that is relevant to </li></ul><ul><li>middle years concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Raise expectations of learning </li></ul><ul><li>   </li></ul><ul><li>The more emotional connections and interest that can be created, the easier it is to recall and understand information (Carrington, 2006). </li></ul>
  6. 6. Collaborative Group Learning <ul><li>Socially the middle years are afraid to look foolish in front of their peers (NSW Department of Education & Training, 2006) . By using group work, collaborative learning will help to encourage participation in classroom activates and build on social skills (Groundwater-Smith, Mitchell & Mockler, 2007). </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>By understanding individual student differences and working with their learning styles (Armstrong, 1994) , teachers are able to challenge weaknesses and build on strengths. They can then cater for different abilities and learning styles to build confidence, raise expectations of abilities/achievement and extend learning (Pendergast & Bahr, 2005; & Smyth & McInerney, 2007). </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>       Group work </li></ul><ul><li>      Independent work </li></ul><ul><li>      Extension activities to challenge </li></ul><ul><li>      Higher order and abstract thinking </li></ul><ul><li>      Raise expectations of academic achievement </li></ul><ul><li>      Utilise Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Verbal/Linguistic </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>        Logical/Mathematical </li></ul><ul><li>      Visual/ spatial </li></ul><ul><li>        Bodily/Kinasethic </li></ul><ul><li>        Musical Rhythmical </li></ul><ul><li>        Interpersonal </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>  Intrapersonal </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Naturalist </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  8. 8. ICTS in assessments <ul><li>The digital culture that the middle years live in, is all pervasive and invisible because of its commonality. Students are now raised in environments that have never been exposed to anything but technology. Resulting in different ways learning and usage from digital natives compared to adults (Carrington, 2006) . </li></ul><ul><li>Due to school practices being out of date with technology, the middle years are disengaging from learning because there is little relevance to their real world skills (Carrington, 2006; & Groundwater-Smith, Mitchell & Mockler, 2007). </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>By incorporating ICT in assessments, the gap between real world and the classroom can be bridged, which will positively effect disengagement, absenteeism and raise expectations of academic skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Different assessment tasks using ICTS </li></ul><ul><li>Provides opportunities to perform with a learning strength </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges any weaknesses </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporates real world into the classroom environment </li></ul><ul><li>Uses technology that is relevant to middle years </li></ul>
  10. 10. Classroom Environment <ul><li>By having different learning areas such as bean bags, books and computer corners, the middle years will be able to work in an environment that best suits their learning styles. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Different learning areas </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Furniture to fit different physical sizes </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Class rules prominently displayed </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Classroom layout </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Teacher relationships with students <ul><li>Teachers need to be active listeners, adaptable, tolerating, have a sense of humour when dealing with middle years because they tend to push the boundaries of acceptable social behaviour, and challenge authority (Feinstein, 2007; & NSW Department of Education & Training, 2005). </li></ul><ul><li>Meaningful positive relationships based on mutual respect and safe supportive environments are essential to help nurture and guide the morals and values of middle years. </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>By building relationships that are safe, familiar, secure and consistent, academic performance can be addressed followed by disengagement. A good relationship can create stability and avert potential risk taking from middle years who may have no other adult influences. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Building on teacher - student relationships </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Listening and showing respect </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Supportive </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Caring </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Being consistent </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Nurture social values </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage good morals </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Age appropriate decisions </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Giving more responsibility </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Transitional Program for Year 7’s <ul><li>Transitional programs are designed to give middle years transferring into High Schools coping methods and strategies. By exposing and incorporating transitional concepts into year 7, the change between Primary and Secondary learning structures, can become smoother and less of a scary experience (Carrington, 2006) . </li></ul>
  15. 15. <ul><li>Tidy trays under the deck taken away and using school bags </li></ul><ul><li>Homework due at different times </li></ul><ul><li>Open days at High School </li></ul><ul><li>Visiting secondary Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Maps and visits for orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Packing up and re-entering classroom </li></ul><ul><li>between subjects </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher teams to teach Maths, </li></ul><ul><li>Science and English </li></ul>
  16. 16. Parents and carers can help create a supportive learning environment for middle years by: <ul><ul><li>Arranging to meet teachers and discuss coping </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>methods and strategies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Being consistent and fair in treatment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Listening to concerns and being supportive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Giving more responsibility </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Letting them make age appropriate decisions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Understand that there are four different perspectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>affecting development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Not arguing back but waiting for middle years to calm </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>down </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Raising expectations of achievement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assisting in school activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Caring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nurturing good morals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Being enthusiastic about learning </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. <ul><li>“ Community based action projects can provide a learning content that reconnects students with school and that contributes to their development as life long learners ” (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2005, pp. Discussion starters: Purposeful learning in the middle years). </li></ul>
  18. 18. Conclusion <ul><li>We at Bluewater State School need to change the way we deal with the middle years so that we can better position our students to achieve a secure and successful future. That includes personal achievement, emotional and physical well-being, and the confidence to forge forward because of good social skills. Support from teachers, using ICTs in assessments, group work, student centred learning and parental support are crucial for middle schooling. They can raise academic expectations, re-engage and encourage middle years to attend due to practices that include a student negotiated curriculum. </li></ul>

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