February 23, 2012
Why is Brain Science so “hot” in business?   “Secret decoder” for behavior   Scientific data to support insight   Build...
Inspiration and Influence: Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor
Managing the brain; maximizing impact   The Triune Brain       Managing the Lizard (Limbic System)       Maximizing you...
50,000 year old brains…
Our history…   ~ 4+ billion years of earth   3.5 billion years of life   650 million years of multi-celled organisms  ...
The Three Part Brain   Brain Stem   Limbic   Prefrontal Cortex    ( PFC)
Triune Brain   Reptilian:       Brainstem, cerebellum (movement), hypothalamus        (regulates primal drives – sex, fo...
Negativity Bias   “Sticks” - Predators, natural hazards, social    aggression, pain (physical and psychological)   “Carr...
Consulting & Innovation   January 24, 2012 Module B 2011-2012
Effects on Cognition
The Lizzard is fast…•   Every interaction is based on how a person    perceives danger and reward – processed in about    ...
Decoding the Lizard Brain    The limbic system is aroused by emotions    Makes toward or away decisions    Hot spots ar...
Executive Presence Practice   1-2 min restores O2 and    stops fight or flight    response   Creativity research    show...
Physical effects of Meditation   Strengthens anterior (frontal) cingulate cortex.    Results improve attention, empathy a...
SCARF Model of Social Threats and Rewards                Consulting & Innovation   January 24, 2012                 Module...
Change puts people in “pain”                       Change=Uncertainty•   In times of change increase the sense of relatedn...
SCARF   With a partner:   Think about the last time you were in a SCARF event    when someone triggered you:       What...
You are the corporate athlete   The brain consumes 25% of our    daily calories   A well rested and fueled brain    has ...
You are the corporate athlete   Sleep is essential       Research shows:            Cognitive function decreased       ...
Getting Ideas to Stick - AGES   Attention   Generative   Emotional   SpacingSource: Davachi, L., Maril, A. and Wagner, A.D...
Attention – get focused  Research shows that the   brain is single processor   capable of fast switching   on up to 7 tas...
Generative – use it!Practice: Ask questions Engage in discussion Do something that  works the concepts into  the brain ...
EmotionPractice:Use emotional devices– story, metaphor,imagesMake a choice aboutpositive and negativeframes
Spacing (and repetition)   7 repetitions to lay    down a new network   1000s to hard wirePractice: space overtime, best...
Managing the brain; maximizing impact   SCARF for quelling the Lizard   AGES for impact, retention and memory   Corpora...
February 23, 2012
Skill development for Building Trust Show                      Acknowledge              Rephrase                   Inquire...
Skill Development: Active Listening                      • Use non-verbal cues - nod  Show Empathy:  70% of              •...
Psychology club hult   prof. boshkoff presentation - march 23, 2012
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Psychology club hult prof. boshkoff presentation - march 23, 2012

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Slides from Professor Boshkoff's presentation during the Hult Management Psychology Club's Management Rewired workshop that took place 3/23/2012

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  • Using recent research in brain science, Professor Boshkoff will discuss how to engage more effectively with others and maximize our impact by deploying brain – savvy techniques.   She will provide insight on the processes of influence and will talk about the ways in which certain subtle behaviors attract or inhibit others with whom we engage.   
  • Engaging: Everybody wants the “secret decoder” for why people (and they themselves) do what they do.Not Fluffy: Leadership behaviors backed by scientific explanations cease to be “nice to haves” and become mandates.Empowering: An understanding of biological programming provides the building blocks to design leadership practices that produce results.Normalizing: We are often privately ashamed of normal human reactions. Understanding our programming gives us compassion for ourselves and others.Relevant: Clients explore concepts, learn new tools and generate specific actions to address their most pressing issues.Staying Power: Leadership fads come and go. Our brains haven’t changed in 10,000 years.
  • ~ 4+ billion years of earth! 3.5 billion years of life! 650 million years of multi-celled organisms! 600 million years of nervous system! ~ 200 million years of mammals! ~ 60 million years of primates! ~ 6 million years ago: last common ancestor with chimpanzees,our closest relative among the “great apes” (gorillas,orangutans, chimpanzees, bonobos, humans)! 2.5 million years of tool-making (starting with brains 1/3 our size)! ~ 150,000 years of homo sapiens! ~ 50,000 years of modern humans! ~ 5000 years of blue, green, hazel eyes
  • Well, according to the Rock and Schwartz article on the Neuroscience of Leadership, we have our brains to blame.Their article explains that change can be painful because it causes sensations of physiological discomfort. It requires the basal ganglia (which is this routine –loving portion of the brain right here) to hand over the keys and let the hard-working, attention intensive pre-frontal cortex to take over-- and it may cause the fear inducing amygdala to fire.To add insult to injury, organizational change is often introduced in routinely ineffective waysBefore we get past the first page of their article, Rock and Schwartz have thrown out two of the leading approaches to change managementBehaviorism, Change efforts based on incentive and threat (the carrot and the stick) , this, they say, rarely succeeds in the long run. and Humanism, the empathic approach of connection and persuasion doesn’t sufficiently engage people and this empathic approach can come off as persuasion which the brain pushes back against—again, it’s the basal ganglia fighting for homeostasis. What the brain wants, if it is to change and make new patterns, is to create that connection—solve that problem—themselves. I think we all prize that feeling we get when something “clicks”.
  • ACC primary monitor of attention. Helps integrate thinking and feeling Amygdala sportlightswhatsrelavant.Epinephrine increases heart rate to move more bloodNorepineprine shunts blood to large muscle groupsCortisol suppresses the immune system to reduce inflamation from woundsDigestion decreasesYour emotions intensitfy organizing the brain for action…your Amugldal which is hardwired to focus on negative info and to react intensly. Consequetnly when you feel stressed you feel fer and anger.Executive control and PFC decline. Like being in a car with a runaway accelleratorPFC pushes toward negative appraisals, attributions.Now the driver of the car thinks everyone else is an idiot. Consider your appraisal of situation when you are upset versus when you are calmer.Seth Grodin
  • Introduce the triune brain – PFC, Lizard (limbic) and brain stem. Show with a hand the three parts.Fondly called the amygdala hijack by pros in the business.
  • I’ll fill this in if you like the idea of a tool for the PFC as well as a tool for the LizardThis is the tool that integrates brain rules 4,5,6,7We are using these techniques in Elluminate sessions too!Davachi, L. (2004) The ensemble that plays together, stays together, Hippocampus, 14:1-3. Davachi, L., Mitchell, J.P. and Wagner, A.D. (2003). Multiple learning mechanisms: distinct medial temporal processes build item and source memories. PNAS, 100(4): 2157-2162 Davachi, L. and Wagner, A.D. (2002). Hippocampal contributions to episodic encoding: insights from relational and item-based learning. Journal of Neurophysiology, 88: 982-990. Davachi, L., Maril, A. and Wagner, A.D. (2001). When keeping in mind supports later bringing to mind: neural markers of phonological rehearsal predict subsequent remembering. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 13:1059-1070. Wagner, A.D. and Davachi, L. (2001). Cognitive neuroscience: forgetting of things past. Current Biology, 11: R964-967. Davachi, L. and Goldman-Rakic, P.S. (2001). Primate rhinal cortex participates in both visual recognition and working memory tasks: functional mapping with 2-DG. Journal of Neurophysiology, 85: 2590-2601. Sybirska, E., Davachi, L. and Goldman-Rakic, P.S. (2000). Prominence of direct entorhinal-CA1 pathway activation by cognitive tasks revealed by 2-DG functional mapping in the nonhuman primate. Journal of Neuroscience, 20: 5827-5834. Levy, R., Friedman, H.R., Davachi, L. and Goldman-Rakic, P.S. (1997). Differential activation of the caudate nucleus in primates performing spatial and nonspatial working memory tasks. Journal of Neuroscience, 17: 3870-3882. Rangarajan, A., Chui, H., Mjolsness, E., Pappu, S., Davachi, L., Goldman-Rakic P.S. and Duncan, J. (1996/7). A robust point-matching algorithm for autoradiographic alignment. Medical Image Analysis, 1: 379-398. Carden, S.E., Davachi, L. and Hofer, M.A. (1994). U50-488 increases ultrasonic vocalizations in 3-, 10-, and 18-day old rat pups in isolation and the home cage. Developmental Psychobiology, 27: 65-83.
  • Engaging: Everybody wants the “secret decoder” for why people (and they themselves) do what they do.Not Fluffy: Leadership behaviors backed by scientific explanations cease to be “nice to haves” and become mandates.Empowering: An understanding of biological programming provides the building blocks to design leadership practices that produce results.Normalizing: We are often privately ashamed of normal human reactions. Understanding our programming gives us compassion for ourselves and others.Relevant: Clients explore concepts, learn new tools and generate specific actions to address their most pressing issues.Staying Power: Leadership fads come and go. Our brains haven’t changed in 10,000 years.
  • Using recent research in brain science, Professor Boshkoff will discuss how to engage more effectively with others and maximize our impact by deploying brain – savvy techniques.   She will provide insight on the processes of influence and will talk about the ways in which certain subtle behaviors attract or inhibit others with whom we engage.   
  • Psychology club hult prof. boshkoff presentation - march 23, 2012

    1. 1. February 23, 2012
    2. 2. Why is Brain Science so “hot” in business? “Secret decoder” for behavior Scientific data to support insight Building blocks for understanding what works Offers the promise of lasting change Relevant at the C-Level
    3. 3. Inspiration and Influence: Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor
    4. 4. Managing the brain; maximizing impact The Triune Brain  Managing the Lizard (Limbic System)  Maximizing your PFC (Pre-Frontal Cortex) Brain mastery – for students! Questions
    5. 5. 50,000 year old brains…
    6. 6. Our history… ~ 4+ billion years of earth 3.5 billion years of life 650 million years of multi-celled organisms 600 million years of nervous system ~ 200 million years of mammals ~ 60 million years of primates ~ 6 million years ago: last common ancestor with chimpanzees, our closest relative among the “great apes” (gorillas, orangutans, chimpanzees, bonobos, humans) 2.5 million years of tool-making (starting with brains 1/3 our size) ~ 150,000 years of homo sapiens ~ 50,000 years of modern humans ~ 5000 years of blue, green, hazel eyes
    7. 7. The Three Part Brain Brain Stem Limbic Prefrontal Cortex ( PFC)
    8. 8. Triune Brain Reptilian:  Brainstem, cerebellum (movement), hypothalamus (regulates primal drives – sex, food)  Reactive and reflexive  Avoid hazards Mammalian:  Limbic system (emotion), cingulate (attention), early cortex  Memory, emotion, social behavior  Approach rewards Human:  Massive cerebral cortex  Abstract thought, language, cooperative planning, empathy
    9. 9. Negativity Bias “Sticks” - Predators, natural hazards, social aggression, pain (physical and psychological) “Carrots” - Food, sex, shelter, social support, pleasure (physical and psychological) During evolution, avoiding “sticks” usually had more effects on survival than approaching “carrots.” Urgency - Usually, sticks must be dealt with immediately, while carrots allow a longer approach. Impact - Sticks usually determine mortality, carrots not; fail to avoid a stick today, no carrots tomorrow!
    10. 10. Consulting & Innovation January 24, 2012 Module B 2011-2012
    11. 11. Effects on Cognition
    12. 12. The Lizzard is fast…• Every interaction is based on how a person perceives danger and reward – processed in about 1/20 of a second• We make these decisions biologically. 90% of our brain processing operation is unconscious and not known to us• The limbic brain reaches a conclusion faster than the PFC and the PFC catches up with the logic
    13. 13. Decoding the Lizard Brain  The limbic system is aroused by emotions  Makes toward or away decisions  Hot spots are patterns of experience stored in your limbic system and tagged as dangerous  An overly aroused limbic system impairs your cognitive functioning and dramatically reduces resources to the prefrontal cortex (PFC)  Once aroused, trying to suppress it only makes it worse and is very expensive on resource
    14. 14. Executive Presence Practice 1-2 min restores O2 and stops fight or flight response Creativity research shows that extended meditation practice increases abilities for creativity and insight
    15. 15. Physical effects of Meditation Strengthens anterior (frontal) cingulate cortex. Results improve attention, empathy and compassion Increases activation of left frontal regions which lifts mood Increases power and reach of gamma-range brain waves Decreases stress-related cortisol Stronger immune systemSource: Dr. Rick Hanson, Self-directed Neuroplasticity, Mindfulness, andMeditation – UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, 2011
    16. 16. SCARF Model of Social Threats and Rewards Consulting & Innovation January 24, 2012 Module B 2011-2012
    17. 17. Change puts people in “pain” Change=Uncertainty• In times of change increase the sense of relatedness and fairness• When threatening one area balance out with others• Some events produce a really strong SCARF response i.e. “English is now our global language” creates threat in all 5 areas• There are strong cultural differences in SCARF. Beginning to identify series of genes that makes relatedness more important in some cultures.
    18. 18. SCARF With a partner: Think about the last time you were in a SCARF event when someone triggered you:  What happened to set you off?  How might you handle the event differently next time?
    19. 19. You are the corporate athlete The brain consumes 25% of our daily calories A well rested and fueled brain has ONLY about 3 hours of very high capacity resource per day Ultradian cycles are unique to each person - 90 minute cycles  Ruthlessly manage your schedule and work in 90 minute cycles with breaks  Prioritize processing tasks for the limited times of high processing capabilities  Fuel
    20. 20. You are the corporate athlete Sleep is essential  Research shows:  Cognitive function decreased to that of legally intoxicated after only 5 nights of severe sleep deprivation (4 hrs. per night)  Long term sleep deprivation (less than 7 hours per night) inhibits memory  2 Rem Cycles needed for maximum memory retention  10-30 minute nap shown to sustain cognitive performance  90 minute nap restores memory and enables cell repair
    21. 21. Getting Ideas to Stick - AGES Attention Generative Emotional SpacingSource: Davachi, L., Maril, A. and Wagner, A.D. (2001). When keeping in mind supportslater bringing to mind: neural markers of phonological rehearsal predict subsequentremembering. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 13:1059-1070.
    22. 22. Attention – get focused Research shows that the brain is single processor capable of fast switching on up to 7 tasks However, multi-tasking reduces time to complete tasks by 25% and overall IQ by 15 %Practice – eliminatedistractions (devices, music,interruptions)
    23. 23. Generative – use it!Practice: Ask questions Engage in discussion Do something that works the concepts into the brain – assignment, survey Be active
    24. 24. EmotionPractice:Use emotional devices– story, metaphor,imagesMake a choice aboutpositive and negativeframes
    25. 25. Spacing (and repetition) 7 repetitions to lay down a new network 1000s to hard wirePractice: space overtime, best if one nightof sleep in betweenintervals – repetition! MIT: Magnetic Resonance Mathematical Model – Neuro- networks of the Neo Cortex, 2008
    26. 26. Managing the brain; maximizing impact SCARF for quelling the Lizard AGES for impact, retention and memory Corporate Athlete practices for surviving and thriving as a busy student!
    27. 27. February 23, 2012
    28. 28. Skill development for Building Trust Show Acknowledge Rephrase InquireEmpathy Feelings
    29. 29. Skill Development: Active Listening • Use non-verbal cues - nod Show Empathy: 70% of • “OK” Communication is • “I got that…” Non-verbal • Use open body language • “Just to play back…” Rephrase • “What I hear you saying is…” Acknowledge • “I hear you saying that…” Feelings • Inquire: • “Can you say more about…?” Ask Open Questions (How, • “Help me understand….” What) • “What are the issues with…?

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