Ed tech2011

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Presentation on Academic Freedom delivered at the ILTA's EdTech 2011 conference in Waterford, June 2011.

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Ed tech2011

  1. 1. "What can I say?” Academic freedom, freedom of expression and the internet K.C. O’Rourke Dublin Institute of Technology
  2. 6. Academic Freedom <ul><li>A member of the academic staff of a university shall have the freedom, within the law, in his or her teaching, research and any other activities either in or outside the university, to question and test received wisdom, to put forward new ideas and to state controversial or unpopular opinions and shall not be disadvantaged, or subject to less favourable treatment by the university, for the exercise of that freedom. </li></ul><ul><li>The Universities Act (1997) Section 14(2) </li></ul>
  3. 19. October 1989
  4. 20. October 1989
  5. 21. What is education for?
  6. 22. What is education for? <ul><li>“ the scale of values in a society inevitably determines its educational aims and priorities. We in Ireland have our own scale of values. Each human being is created in God’s image. He has a life to lead and a soul to be saved. Education is therefore concerned not only with life but with the purpose of life.” </li></ul>
  7. 23. What is education for? <ul><li>“ the scale of values in a society inevitably determines its educational aims and priorities. We in Ireland have our own scale of values. Each human being is created in God’s image. He has a life to lead and a soul to be saved. Education is therefore concerned not only with life but with the purpose of life.” </li></ul><ul><li>Department of Education (1971) Primary School Curriculum: </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher’s Handbook, Part I </li></ul>
  8. 24. In the web 2.0 world, everybody is equal
  9. 25. Ireland 2011
  10. 35. <ul><li>In cyberspace, the distinction between public and private grows ever narrower. Personal details about everybody can be retrieved in seconds via Google, and the opinions of students and academic staff casually expressed on social networking sites have been known to have widespread and serious unintended repercussions. </li></ul>
  11. 38. Plagiarism Plagiarism Plagiarism <ul><li>Plagiarism and the Web: Myths and Realities </li></ul><ul><li>White Paper, available at http://www.turnitin.com </li></ul>
  12. 41. Atlantic Books 2010
  13. 42. In the web 2.0 world, everybody is equal
  14. 43. <ul><li>“ Although it often goes largely unnoticed, centralized government control over a country’s connection to international internet traffic poses a significant threat to online free expression and privacy, particularly at times of political turmoil.” </li></ul><ul><li>S. Kelly & S. Cooke (eds) (2011) Freedom on the Net 2011: A Global Assessment of Internet and Digital Media , Freedom House </li></ul>
  15. 45. S. Kelly & S. Cooke (eds) (2011) Freedom on the Net 2011: A Global Assessment of Internet and Digital Media , Freedom House
  16. 50. <ul><li>Freedom of speech means giving everyone— not just a small number of people who own dominant modes of mass communication, but ordinary people, too—the chance to use technology to participate in their culture, to interact, to create, to build, to route around and glom on, to take from the old and produce the new, and to talk about whatever they want to talk about, whether it be politics, public issues, or popular culture. </li></ul><ul><li>J.M. Balkin, “Digital Speech and Democratic Culture”, </li></ul><ul><li>New York University Law Review (2004) </li></ul>
  17. 51. In the web 2.0 world, everybody is equal
  18. 54. <ul><li>John Stuart Mill (1806–1873) </li></ul>
  19. 55. <ul><li>John Stuart Mill (1806–1873) </li></ul><ul><li>On Liberty (1859) </li></ul>
  20. 56. <ul><li>“ Human nature is not a machine to be built after a model, and set to do exactly the work prescribed for it, but a tree, which requires to grow and develop itself on all sides, according to the tendency of the inward forces which make it a living thing.” </li></ul><ul><li>John Stuart Mill On Liberty (1859) </li></ul>
  21. 57. <ul><li>“ .. the peculiar evil of silencing the expression of an opinion is, that it is robbing the human race; posterity as well as the existing generation; those who dissent from the opinion, still more than those who hold it.” </li></ul><ul><li>John Stuart Mill On Liberty (1859) </li></ul>
  22. 60. <ul><li>“ Disciplines have long standing traditions about the ways of creating knowledge, but the waves of knowledge from the Internet are overwhelming and suggest that academic professionals may not be able to control their disciplines as they have done in the past…. The coherence of disciplines faces a substantial challenge, as does the construct of academic freedom.” </li></ul><ul><li>P. Hutcheson “The Disemboweled University”, </li></ul><ul><li>AAUP Journal of Academic Freedom , Vol. 2 (2011) </li></ul>
  23. 62. Towards the future? <ul><li>“ Control is the legacy of educational practice, from manipulation of the masses and the preservation of an intellectual hierarchy, to quality assurance and the commercialism of education in today’s online universities. The locus of control will certainly shift in the future, but it appears unlikely that it will be lost to the gatekeepers of higher education.” </li></ul><ul><li>N. Fitzpatrick, N. Hayes and K.C. O’Rourke (2009), “Beyond Constriction and Control: Constructivism in Online Theory and Practice”, in C. Payne (ed.) Information Technology and Constructivism in Higher Education: Progressive Learning Frameworks , IGI Global </li></ul>
  24. 63. In the web 2.0 world, everybody is equal
  25. 65. In the web 2.0 world, is everybody equal?
  26. 66. Towards the future? <ul><li>“ [we need] a more developed curriculum on media and digital literacy for children to be able to benefit from the opportunities and to manoeuvre around the risks related to media and internet use.” </li></ul><ul><li>B. O’Neill & I. Hagen (2009) ‘Media Literacy’ </li></ul><ul><li>in S. Livingstone and L. Haddon (eds), Kids Online: </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities and Risks for Children, Sheffield: Policy Press </li></ul>
  27. 67. &quot;What can I say?” <ul><li>What do you think? </li></ul>
  28. 68. Thank you! [email_address] K.C. O’Rourke Dublin Institute of Technology

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