Section III : Establishing aClassroom Management SystemBuilt on Mutual Respect andCaring Environment
When a teachers plan an excitingcurriculum and actively engagestudents in learning activities, thestudents are much less l...
SCOPE OF SECTION III•   MODELING AND BUILDING MUTUAL RESPECT:    TEACHER/STUDENT, STUDENT/STUDENT INTERACTION•   ESTABLISH...
MODELING AND BUILDING MUTUAL             RESPECT:TEACHER/STUDENT, STUDENT/STUDENT           INTERACTION
Modelling, practice, and rehearsal are thecornerstones for establishing a warm and caringenvironment. The basic rule for a...
The steps for modelling and building mutual           respect in the classroom. Establish classroom expectations      Beg...
 Practice respectful interactions       Prepare a series of situations that are likely to       occur in the classroom. A...
 Chart non respectful words and possible substitutions      Ask the students to think about words that do not      show r...
Create a classroom chart of problem-solving procedures        Lead a discussion of ways in which problem can be        sol...
Use classroom situations to further the students’understanding       As situation arise in the classroom, model respectfu...
ESTABLISHING ROUTINES AND SMOOTH           TRANSITIONS
Routines help students understand when thingswill happen and what is expected of them. Theteacher must carefully set expec...
Example of Classroom Routines ..Routine                  ExpectationsEntering the classroom   Place coats & sweaters in cl...
The steps for establishing and implementing              classroom routines. Involves students in setting classroom routi...
 Choose a set of routines     From the list, choose three to five with which to begin.     Explain that these routines wi...
 Chart routines     Create a chart listing routines and students’ names.
 Conduct periodic evaluation and reset routines   as necessary       Monitor the effectiveness of routines, and chart    ...
 Respond rather that react     When you discuss infractions or set up new routines     be sure that you respond to the pr...
USING INDIVIDUAL CONFERENCES AND          GOAL-SETTING
A learning community focuses oncollaboration, setting personal goals, and self-reflection. Two important tools for establi...
The steps for implementing individual         conference and goal-setting Explain the purpose of individual conference an...
 Demonstrate a conference    With the help of a willing student, model the process    by conducting a demonstration confe...
 Collaboratively design a conference report sheet      Work with students to design a conference report      sheet that w...
 Set up conference schedule      Explain how you will set up conferences and when      they will take place. Prepare for...
 Involve the students in the process     Be sure to give the students the chance to talk during     the conference. Ask t...
USING CONTRACTS TO BUILD INTRINSIC          MOTIVATION
An individual contract can change student work habits,Interactions, or behaviours. It is not appropriate for everyStudent ...
The steps for writing and implementing                student contract Identify specific behaviours or goal to be address...
 Involve the students in the conversation     Before the teacher ever suggests a contract, he must     verify that the st...
 Draw up the contract     The contract is formally written, word-processed,     signed, and dated. The elements must be s...
 Monitor students progress    Check with the student each day to monitor progress.    Acknowledge progress with a two thu...
 Acknowledge the student’s accomplishment     Celebrate the accomplishment with the rest of the     learning community. K...
IMPLEMENTING CLASS MEETINGS
Team-building is vital to developing a community oflearners. Make time each day for the class to express concerns and cele...
The teachers should do the following...   Use the formal process and hold meetings weekly.   Have all students sit in a ...
The steps for conducting class meetings Seat students in circle      Students should be seated so they can make eye      ...
 Explain the purpose and expectations for the meetings     Students should understand that class meetings are a     time ...
 Begin with compliments      To set a positive tone, students are given an      opportunity to compliment one another.  ...
 Move through the agenda    The group leader must keep the agenda moving.    Teachers may want to hold class meetings at ...
CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT Establishing a Classroom Management System Built on Mutual Respect and Caring Environment
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CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT Establishing a Classroom Management System Built on Mutual Respect and Caring Environment

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* MODELING AND BUILDING MUTUAL RESPECT: TEACHER/STUDENT, STUDENT/STUDENT INTERACTION

* MODELING AND BUILDING MUTUAL RESPECT: TEACHER/STUDENT, STUDENT/STUDENT INTERACTION

* USING CONTRACTS TO BUILD INTRINSIC MOTIVATION

* IMPLEMENTING CLASS MEETINGS

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT Establishing a Classroom Management System Built on Mutual Respect and Caring Environment

  1. 1. Section III : Establishing aClassroom Management SystemBuilt on Mutual Respect andCaring Environment
  2. 2. When a teachers plan an excitingcurriculum and actively engagestudents in learning activities, thestudents are much less likely tospend time off task or distractingothers. Major studies on classroommanagement have found thatteachers who are able to maximizeinstructional time and clarify theirexpectations for students spendmuch less time on classroomdisciplines. (Everton &Harris,2002).
  3. 3. SCOPE OF SECTION III• MODELING AND BUILDING MUTUAL RESPECT: TEACHER/STUDENT, STUDENT/STUDENT INTERACTION• ESTABLISHING ROUTINES AND SMOOTH TRANSITIONS• USING INDIVIDUAL CONFERENCES ANG GOAL SETTING• USING CONTRACTS TO BUILD INTRINSIC MOTIVATION• IMPLEMENTING CLASS MEETINGS
  4. 4. MODELING AND BUILDING MUTUAL RESPECT:TEACHER/STUDENT, STUDENT/STUDENT INTERACTION
  5. 5. Modelling, practice, and rehearsal are thecornerstones for establishing a warm and caringenvironment. The basic rule for any classroom is“Always be respectful of others.” Respect includeshonouring other people’s personalspace, belongings, opinions, and efforts to berecognized and accepted in the classroom .
  6. 6. The steps for modelling and building mutual respect in the classroom. Establish classroom expectations Begin the school year by talking to students about the meaning of respect as well as respectful attention and verbal interactions.
  7. 7.  Practice respectful interactions Prepare a series of situations that are likely to occur in the classroom. Ask students to think about how they might react to each situation, then both of you and the students act out a scenario using the students’ suggestion. Classroom Scenarios Michael wants to walk next to his friends in the line going to the cafeteria. When his group is called to line up, he moves to the front and pushes in next to his friends, displacing several students who are already in line.
  8. 8.  Chart non respectful words and possible substitutions Ask the students to think about words that do not show respect and to identify other words that can be substituted to solve problems and show respect.What respect is ... What respect is NOT ...Listening to the other Interrupting while anotherperson’s point of view person is talkingBeing willing to Thinking, “Its my way orcompromise nothing”Being honest Coloring the facts to sway opinion your favorBeing open to a Closing your mind to constructivesolution discussion.
  9. 9. Create a classroom chart of problem-solving procedures Lead a discussion of ways in which problem can be solved, and help students brain storm approached they might use to achieve a mutually acceptable solution.Steps1. Agree to be honest, not call names, not interrupt, and work hard to solve the problem.2. Listen to the other person’s story, restate what he or she said, and ask how that person feels about it.3. Each person tells what he or she wants and is willing to solve the problem.4. Gather all the wants and willing from both sides of the dispute and try to find the solution.5. Summarize the solution and say what you will do if something like this happens again.
  10. 10. Use classroom situations to further the students’understanding As situation arise in the classroom, model respectful interaction and teach approaches to problem-solving. If additional procedures is needed, they can be taught and added to the classroom chart of problem-solving.
  11. 11. ESTABLISHING ROUTINES AND SMOOTH TRANSITIONS
  12. 12. Routines help students understand when thingswill happen and what is expected of them. Theteacher must carefully set expectations as well asthe consequences for students who make poorchoices (Glasser & Dotson,1998).
  13. 13. Example of Classroom Routines ..Routine ExpectationsEntering the classroom Place coats & sweaters in closet, lunchboxes on back shelf,homework in home work fileClassroom Duties Check duty board for your name and perform your duties as needed.Help Needed Stand up your “help” sign and wait for assistance going on with other work while you wait.Others...
  14. 14. The steps for establishing and implementing classroom routines. Involves students in setting classroom routines Discuss the purpose of classroom routines and decisions that need to be made about them. List their suggestions and include yours, after you explain them.
  15. 15.  Choose a set of routines From the list, choose three to five with which to begin. Explain that these routines will be tried and evaluated before they kept or change. Discuss natural consequences Talk about making choices and what happens when we choose to break a rule or not follow a routine.
  16. 16.  Chart routines Create a chart listing routines and students’ names.
  17. 17.  Conduct periodic evaluation and reset routines as necessary Monitor the effectiveness of routines, and chart infractions as well as students’ choices. Deal with the students who regularly ignore routines or make poor choices. Remember that not all students have the same ability to make good choices. Discuss infractions privately with the student. Make it clear that you see the problem as poor choice-making.
  18. 18.  Respond rather that react When you discuss infractions or set up new routines be sure that you respond to the problem instead react to it.
  19. 19. USING INDIVIDUAL CONFERENCES AND GOAL-SETTING
  20. 20. A learning community focuses oncollaboration, setting personal goals, and self-reflection. Two important tools for establishing andmeeting these outcomes are individualconferences and goal-setting. Students becomeself-reflective only after they recognize both theirstrengths and areas for improvement(Bridges,1995).
  21. 21. The steps for implementing individual conference and goal-setting Explain the purpose of individual conference and goal setting. Involve students in a discussion about what conferences are, how often they will occur and their purpose.
  22. 22.  Demonstrate a conference With the help of a willing student, model the process by conducting a demonstration conference in which you look at a piece of work and set goals together. Discuss elements of a successful conference Talk about demonstration conference. Point out the student’s involvement, how strengths are identified, and how goals are set for the next conference.
  23. 23.  Collaboratively design a conference report sheet Work with students to design a conference report sheet that will document the elements discussed. Student’s name_______________ Date of conference_______ Academic topics _____________________________________ Behavior topics______________________________________ Responsibity topics___________________________________ Academic goal sets ___________________________________ Behavioral goal sets __________________________________ Responsibility goal sets _______________________________ Other goals set ______________________________________ Student’s signature __________________________________ Teacher’s signature ___________________________ _______ Approximate date of next conference ___________________ Comments :________________________________________
  24. 24.  Set up conference schedule Explain how you will set up conferences and when they will take place. Prepare for the conferences At first, it is helpful to ask students to bring a specific piece of work to the conference. Before the conference use the report sheet to briefly note any strengths or concern you want to address.
  25. 25.  Involve the students in the process Be sure to give the students the chance to talk during the conference. Ask them to identify their strengths both academically and behaviourally and note what areas they need to work on. Keep the process going and growing Conference must be scheduled regularly. Once a month may be a month for most elementary students, but you may need to meet with others more often.
  26. 26. USING CONTRACTS TO BUILD INTRINSIC MOTIVATION
  27. 27. An individual contract can change student work habits,Interactions, or behaviours. It is not appropriate for everyStudent but is usually reserved for those who need extramotivation in accomplish goals (Brophy,2004).
  28. 28. The steps for writing and implementing student contract Identify specific behaviours or goal to be addressed The students must understand exactly what is expected, and the teacher must suggest a plan that the students can follow.
  29. 29.  Involve the students in the conversation Before the teacher ever suggests a contract, he must verify that the student is willing to work on the problem. Establish the incentive Incentives must be tailored to each student but be appropriate for a learning environment. Stay away from material rewards. Instead, offer free reading time, work with self-selected partner, extra computer time, or the chance to listen to music when completing in-class writing assignments.
  30. 30.  Draw up the contract The contract is formally written, word-processed, signed, and dated. The elements must be specific and the expectations clear. I, Andre Jones, agree to complete my assigned work each day before lunch time. For each day that I finish before lunch, Ms.Rivers will allow me 5 extra minutes of free-time activity. If, at the end of the week, I have completed my work everyday Ms.Rivers will allow me to do free-time activities with my friends instead of by myself. I understand that my friends and I must work quietly enough so that we don’t disturb the other students. Signed on this 19th day of September,2006. _____________________ __________________ Student’s Signature Teacher’s Signature
  31. 31.  Monitor students progress Check with the student each day to monitor progress. Acknowledge progress with a two thumbs-up signal, verbal encouragement, or any other brief celebration. Follow up on the appointed date At the conference, discuss student progress. If the student has accomplished his goals, follow up with the incentives. If the student has made the progress but has not met the goals, extend or revise the contract.
  32. 32.  Acknowledge the student’s accomplishment Celebrate the accomplishment with the rest of the learning community. Keep it simple, but let other students know how hard the student has worked and how important it is for him to set goals and accomplish them. Move from the incentive to the intrinsic The student’s feeling of accomplishment after fulfilling a contract becomes the basis of a discussion between student and teacher.
  33. 33. IMPLEMENTING CLASS MEETINGS
  34. 34. Team-building is vital to developing a community oflearners. Make time each day for the class to express concerns and celebrate successes. Class meetings providea perfect forum for this interaction (Glasser,1969).
  35. 35. The teachers should do the following... Use the formal process and hold meetings weekly. Have all students sit in a circle, facing each other. Model respectful behaviour. Do not dominate the process. Trust your students to lead meetings, participate in the process, choose the solutions, and make decisions.
  36. 36. The steps for conducting class meetings Seat students in circle Students should be seated so they can make eye contact with everyone in the group. They can move their desks into circle, sits in chairs around a circle, or sit in circle on the floor.
  37. 37.  Explain the purpose and expectations for the meetings Students should understand that class meetings are a time for mutual respect. Establish a method to make sure that no one, even a teacher, monopolizes the discussion. Establish the agenda The teacher should sets up a class-meeting agenda box in the room. The students may submit agenda items using a form that they complete.
  38. 38.  Begin with compliments To set a positive tone, students are given an opportunity to compliment one another.  Conduct the discussion Allow students to discuss the problems, share their views and experience as long as they stay respectful and take turns. Teacher will serve as peacemakers. Brainstorm solutions Students suggest solutions, which are written on the board. The teacher may serve as scribe. All suggestions are written down without any judgement. After the list is complete, the group votes on which solution to try first.
  39. 39.  Move through the agenda The group leader must keep the agenda moving. Teachers may want to hold class meetings at the end of the day or right before lunch to ensure that they do not exceed 15-20 minutes for young children or 30-45 minutes for older students (Styles,2001). Review the plan At the end of the meeting, briefly review the plan and note the next meeting date. Make it clear that an emergency meeting can be called before the next scheduled meeting, if necessary.

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