The 7 Stage Brain Based Learning Lesson Planning

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  • Wow! This looks exactly like Eric Jensen's work - almost word for word! I just bought his book.
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  • I appreciate it!
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  • I'm doing research on BBL. and was searching for lesson plan. got ur presentation. it was wonderful. definitely it will help me preparing lesson plan. thanks to you Mam.
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  • very good presentation,. it really helps! Thanks for sharing this one to us^^,
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  • this one is perfect,. thanks for sharing this very important presentation
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The 7 Stage Brain Based Learning Lesson Planning

  1. 1. The 7 Stage Brain Based Learning Lesson Planning Outline
  2. 2. The process <ul><li>The following strategies are organized in a sequence as outlined by Jensen that makes sense to the brain. The list is by no means exhaustive. Use this outline as a means to check against your lesson plans to make sure that you have set appropriate goals for each of the learning stages. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Stage 1: Pre Exposure <ul><li>This phase provides the brain with an overview of the new learning before really digging into the concept. Pre exposure helps the brain develop better conceptual maps. </li></ul><ul><li>Ideas of this stage: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Post an overview of the new topic on the bulletin board. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage good nutrition and drinking plenty of water. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Start here student knowledge base begins and build upon their interests related to the concept. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have learners set their own goals and discuss goals for the class as well. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan Brain wake-ups, such as cross laterals. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Stage 2: Preparation <ul><li>This is the phase where you create the curiosity or the excitement. It is similar to the “Anticipatory Set” but goes farther in preparing the learner. </li></ul><ul><li>Ideas to incorporate: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Create a “you are there” experience. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Elicit from learners what possible value and relevance the topic has to them personally. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The brain learns very well from concrete experiences. Provided a real, physical or concrete exposure for the class. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide a hook or surprise or a bit of novelty to engage learner emotions. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Stage 3 – Initiation and Acquisition <ul><li>This stage provides the immersion. Flood with content! Instead of the single, lock step, one bite at a time presentation, provide an initial virtual overload of ideas, details, complexity, and meanings. Allow a sense of temporary overwhelm to occur in learners. This will be followed by anticipation, curiosity, and a determination to discover meaning for oneself. Over time it all gets sorted out by the learner. It is like the real world outside the classroom, </li></ul><ul><li>Try these: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide concrete learning experiences such as case studies, experiment, a field trip, interviews, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide activities that employ a majority of the multiple intelligences. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Offer a group or team project that encompasses building, finding, exploring, or designing. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Attend the theater, put on a skit, produce a commercial, or create a class/school newspaper. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide enough choice so that learners have the opportunity to explore the subject using their preferred learning modality: visual, auditory, kinesthetic, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A well designed computer program or activity can be very helpful at this stage. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Stage 4: Elaboration <ul><li>This is the process stage. It requires genuine thinking on the part of the learner. This is the time to make intellectual sense of the learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Try these: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide and open ended debriefing of the previous activity. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tie things together so the learning across disciplines occurs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have learners design an evaluation procedure or rubric for their own learning. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have learners explore the topic online. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hold a debate, essay contest or panel discussion on the topic. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have students to the teaching in small groups, as class presenters, in pairs. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Stage 5: Incubation and Memory Encoding <ul><li>This phase emphasizes the importance of down time and review time. The brain learns most effectively over time, not all at once. </li></ul><ul><li>Try these: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide time for unguided reflection. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have learners keep a journal of their learning. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have learners take a walk in pairs to discuss the learning. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide stretching and relaxation exercises. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide a music listening area. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask learners to discuss new learning with their family and friends. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Stage 6: Verification and Confidence Check <ul><li>This phase is not just for the benefit of the teacher. Learners need to confirm their learning for themselves, as well. Learning is best remembered when the student possesses a model or metaphor regarding the new concepts or materials. </li></ul><ul><li>Try these: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Have learners present their learning to others. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Student interviews and evaluate each other. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students write about what they have learned in a journal, essay, news article, report. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students demonstrate learning with a project. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students present a role play or skit or theatrical performance. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quiz, verbal or written. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Stage 7: Celebration and Integration <ul><li>In the celebration phase it is critical to engage emotions. Make it fun, light, and joyful. This step instills the important love of learning. It must never be missed. </li></ul><ul><li>Try these: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Have a class toast with juice. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide sharing time, peer sharing, demonstration, acknowledgements. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Play music, hang streamers and blow horns to celebrate the end of a successful unit. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Invite another class, parents, principal, or community guest through video conferencing to view projects. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilitate a class designed and produced celebration party. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Incorporate the new learning in future lessons! Never introduce something, then drop it. If it is not important enough to refer to in the future, don’t waste time on it to begin with. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. What this means to you: <ul><li>It is critical that we plan learning with the brain in mind to ask a different set of questions. Rather than, what should I teach, ask how will students best learn? As you plan the learning, keep the focus on basic principles that support the brain’s natural learning tendencies. Create a complex interdisciplinary curriculum that provides for plenty of learner choice. Provide structure, but in an environment that represents the unique nature of each learner and their individual needs and experiences. </li></ul>

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