Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

of

The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 1 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 2 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 3 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 4 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 5 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 6 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 7 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 8 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 9 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 10 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 11 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 12 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 13 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 14 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 15 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 16 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 17 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 18 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 19 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 20 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 21 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 22 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 23 The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Slide 24
Upcoming SlideShare
Past, Present and future
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

2 Likes

Share

Download to read offline

The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis

Download to read offline

Business analysis is growing beyond its roots in software requirements engineering and process performance measurement to become a true profession focused on organizational change. To be successful, business analysts will find themselves focusing less on technology and detailed specifications and more on business value, strategy, and delivering results. The demand for business analysts with these skills is only going to increase in the years to come. Business analysts must learn to look beyond project scope to understand why the business needs to change, and to help the business realize the benefits of change. If companies are going to survive and thrive in an increasingly competitive and globalized world, they will need business analysts to move beyond facilitation and requirements management and embrace architecture and design. The future for the business analysis profession is very, very bright - as long as we are willing to grasp it.

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis

  1. 1. The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis Title Slide Include a tagline for your presentation here BBC 2013 1
  2. 2. Once upon a time... Image ©2009 Doug Kerr, Licensed Under CC-BY-SA How I Became A BA 2
  3. 3. Nobody Understood What We Did PM? Rules? Testing? Coding? UX? Process? Requirements? Training? Data? Coffee? © 2012 CollegeDegrees360. Licensed under CC-BY-SA. 3
  4. 4. Projects Paid A High Price Flawed business analysis work became a key point of failure for projects and drove much higher delivery costs “Analysts report that as many as 71% of software projects that fail do so because of poor requirements management, making it the single biggest reason for project failure— bigger than bad technology, missed deadlines or change management fiascoes.” Source: CIO Magazine, 11/15/2005 4
  5. 5. Are we: ORDER-TAKERS? GOFERS? ASSISTANT PROJECT MANAGERS? DOCUMENTERS? Or would we rise to the challenge? 5
  6. 6. Business Analysis Had to Change New tools and techniques, methodologies, and organizations began to define and improve how business analysts worked. ‣ Methodologies began to address requirements development in earnest ‣ Specialized techniques emerged taking us past “the system shall” ‣ IIBA formed in 2003 to help move profession forward 6
  7. 7. Business Analysis Became A Profession We developed a shared understanding of the role so that we could define how to deliver better project outcomes. 7
  8. 8. Bridging the gap between… Business and IT 8 © 2011 Jonas Ginter. Licensed under CC-BY-NC-ND. 8
  9. 9. But that didn’t fix the problem According to PMI, less than ⅔ of projects meet their business goals and that number has been falling since 2008. Standish Group CHAOS Report 60 50 40 Succeeded 30 Challenged Failed 20 10 0 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2009 Source: The Standish Group Project Resolution History, PMI Pulse of the Profession 9
  10. 10. Business Value Isn’t Inside Projects We can only do so much to improve business value by focusing on managing requirements within a project. Traditional BA Space Pre-Project Project Post-Project Rationale Delivery Benefits Enterprise Analysis Requirements Analysis Solution Assessment & Validation 10
  11. 11. Are we: LIAISONS? FACILITATORS? TRANSLATORS? REQUIREMENTS MANAGERS? Or will we rise to the challenge? 11
  12. 12. Business Analysis Has to Change Our focus has to shift again…from tactical support of project delivery to a strategic understanding of business value. ‣ Requirements management focuses us on predictable delivery of scope ‣ We have to focus on delivery of business value ‣ We consistently neglect understanding of the reasons for change and evaluating the benefits 12
  13. 13. Move From Software to Systems Successful change requires that we look at things from a business perspective—software requirements are only a part. People Software Organizational System Rules & Data Process 13
  14. 14. Bridging the gap between… Projects and Operations 14 © 2010 Doug88888. Licensed under CC-BY-NC-SA. 14
  15. 15. We still have the alignment problem… We must strike a balance between analysis and intuition, and take a share of responsibility for business outcomes. Analytical Thinking Architecture and Design Goal: To Produce Reliable, Predictable, Repeata ble Outcomes Reliability Intuitive Thinking Goal: To produce outcomes that meet the desired objectives Validity Source: Roger L. Martin, The Design of Business 15
  16. 16. Embrace Architecture and Design Architecture Architecture and design ensure that we deliver value to our stakeholders by defining solutions that meet their needs Focused on Strategy, Structure and Purpose Focused on Execution and Implementation Provides a vision for Design, keeps it flexible Keeps Architecture grounded and relevant Design 16
  17. 17. Can we become: VISIONARIES? INNOVATORS? STRATEGISTS? LEADERS? Are we up to the challenge? 17
  18. 18. Business Analysis Can Change Again We need to create a feedback loop in the business between its strategies and the results delivered by change. Whole Context Envision Estimate Potential Value Organizat ional Syst em Observe Measure Actual Value Part Component 18
  19. 19. Each Level Builds On The One Before Master the key skills required at each level to earn the trust needed to move to the next. Strategist Facilitator Contributor 19
  20. 20. Bridging the gap between… Strategy and Execution 20 20
  21. 21. Businesses Need Us To Take This Leap The average lifespan of an S&P 500 company has dropped from 67 years in the 1920s to 15 today. ‣ Companies must focus on innovation and reinvention to survive ‣ Process and rules systems intensify competition ‣ Better execution of old models isn’t enough 21
  22. 22. The Path Forward Is Up To Us “Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” Steve Jobs ‣ Business Analysis is a selfimproving profession ‣ This gives us exciting new challenges and opportunities ‣ This gives our employers a better future, greater odds of success Source: Wikipedia 22
  23. 23. “If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less.” Gen. Eric Shinseki 23 23
  24. 24. C o m m u n i t y. I I B A . o r g | I I B A . o r g | i n f o @ I I B A . o r g Kevin Brennan, CBAP®, PMP® Chief Business Analyst, IIBA @bakevin kevin.brennan@IIBA.org 24 © I n t e r n a t i o n a l I n s t i t u t e o f B u s i n e s s A n a l y s i s
  • mylatoc

    Mar. 15, 2015
  • jbabcock

    Dec. 5, 2013

Business analysis is growing beyond its roots in software requirements engineering and process performance measurement to become a true profession focused on organizational change. To be successful, business analysts will find themselves focusing less on technology and detailed specifications and more on business value, strategy, and delivering results. The demand for business analysts with these skills is only going to increase in the years to come. Business analysts must learn to look beyond project scope to understand why the business needs to change, and to help the business realize the benefits of change. If companies are going to survive and thrive in an increasingly competitive and globalized world, they will need business analysts to move beyond facilitation and requirements management and embrace architecture and design. The future for the business analysis profession is very, very bright - as long as we are willing to grasp it.

Views

Total views

2,268

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

228

Actions

Downloads

61

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

2

×