What’s New in the KBRR Invasive Monitoring Program? <ul><li>A new tunicate invader found in Sitka Alaska </li></ul><ul><li...
Botryllid Tunicates Invasive Tunicates  <ul><li>Fouling organisms (tunicates)  </li></ul><ul><li>Many originate in Asia </...
Tunicates can be solitary or colonial
Alaska’s New Invader:  Didemnum vexillum  a.k.a. Rock Vomit or Glove Leather Tunicate <ul><li>Habitat :  Grows on hard sub...
Didemnum vexillum  found on a lantern net in Whiting Harbor, June 2010 Marine Invasive Species BioBlitz
Asexual budding expands  the colony rapidly Photo: J. Nichols
What is Being Done to Address the Invasion? <ul><li>Reducing marine traffic in the affected area: ADF&G coordinated an are...
Vectors: How invasive species are moved to Alaska <ul><li>Fouled vessel hulls, especially slow-moving vessels </li></ul><u...
Current KBRR Tunicate Monitoring Program:  2006-2010 <ul><li>Monitoring locations :  Seldovia and Homer Harbors </li></ul>...
Continued participation in the  Alaska Tunicate Monitoring Program <ul><li>Ketchikan </li></ul><ul><li>Valdez </li></ul><u...
On the KBRR Horizon for Tunicate Monitoring & Research <ul><li>Expand the invasive monitoring program to include a researc...
A Community Council Opportunity… <ul><li>Advocate for support of invasive species monitoring and a funding plan for the re...
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Kachemak Bay NERR, Alaska Invasive Tunicate

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An overview of the Invasive species program at the Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve located in Homer, Alaska - Angela Doroff and Catie Bursch

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  • Point out the tendril that will drop off and float in the current, looking for a new home.
  • Actual Monitoring: Valdez Cordova Whittier Kodiak Juneau Dutch Harbor Tatitlek Homer Trained, but not sites established? Ketchikan Sitka Slated for training this year: Chenega Bay Seward
  • Kachemak Bay NERR, Alaska Invasive Tunicate

    1. 1. What’s New in the KBRR Invasive Monitoring Program? <ul><li>A new tunicate invader found in Sitka Alaska </li></ul><ul><li>A new approach to the KBBR Monitoring and Research program </li></ul><ul><li>Legislative support for invasive species response: some opportunities </li></ul>
    2. 2. Botryllid Tunicates Invasive Tunicates <ul><li>Fouling organisms (tunicates) </li></ul><ul><li>Many originate in Asia </li></ul><ul><li>Cause problems for marine infrastructure including boats and aquaculture </li></ul><ul><li>Out-compete native benthic organisms </li></ul><ul><li>Difficult to remove </li></ul>
    3. 3. Tunicates can be solitary or colonial
    4. 4. Alaska’s New Invader: Didemnum vexillum a.k.a. Rock Vomit or Glove Leather Tunicate <ul><li>Habitat : Grows on hard substrate ranging from docks, to shells of bivalves to gravel seabeds; has been found growing on live crabs, kelp, and eel grass, but not on sandy sea floor. </li></ul><ul><li>Effects : This rapidly growing tunicate will grow over near-shore marine habitat and suffocate invertebrates such as: sponges, hydroids, anemones, limpets, oysters, mussels, scallops, barnacles, and other sea squirts. </li></ul><ul><li>Current Range : Globally and in the U.S. along the Pacific & Atlantic coasts and now Alaska </li></ul>Photo: Anna Epelbaum
    5. 5. Didemnum vexillum found on a lantern net in Whiting Harbor, June 2010 Marine Invasive Species BioBlitz
    6. 6. Asexual budding expands the colony rapidly Photo: J. Nichols
    7. 7. What is Being Done to Address the Invasion? <ul><li>Reducing marine traffic in the affected area: ADF&G coordinated an area closure </li></ul><ul><li>Conducting broad-scale dive surveys to determine distribution </li></ul><ul><li>Communication to local residences, mariculture programs, and Alaska Marine Invasive Species Working Group </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation of quarantine and removal strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Implementation of a rapid response plan fall/winter 2010/2011 </li></ul>
    8. 8. Vectors: How invasive species are moved to Alaska <ul><li>Fouled vessel hulls, especially slow-moving vessels </li></ul><ul><li>Ballast water </li></ul><ul><li>Relocating fouled docks from infested waters </li></ul><ul><li>Contaminated aquaculture gear and products </li></ul><ul><li>Contaminated imported shellfish stock </li></ul>
    9. 9. Current KBRR Tunicate Monitoring Program: 2006-2010 <ul><li>Monitoring locations : Seldovia and Homer Harbors </li></ul><ul><li>Methods : 10 plastic plates are suspended under a brick (for weight) and checked 3 times a year for what has settled on them </li></ul><ul><li>Results : Normally we see around 5 different native tunicates on the plates. </li></ul><ul><li>Best Bets : Catie is working on a tunicate guide to aid in identification of resident and invasive tunicates </li></ul>
    10. 10. Continued participation in the Alaska Tunicate Monitoring Program <ul><li>Ketchikan </li></ul><ul><li>Valdez </li></ul><ul><li>Cordova </li></ul><ul><li>Whittier </li></ul><ul><li>Chenega Bay </li></ul><ul><li>Tatitalek </li></ul><ul><li>Seward </li></ul><ul><li>Sitka </li></ul><ul><li>Homer </li></ul><ul><li>Kodiak </li></ul><ul><li>Juneau </li></ul><ul><li>Dutch Harbor </li></ul>
    11. 11. On the KBRR Horizon for Tunicate Monitoring & Research <ul><li>Expand the invasive monitoring program to include a research plan for potential invasives to Kachemak Bay </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Making full use of data already collected (HABs, Tunicates, Green Crab) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensuring good baseline data prior to an invasive outbreak </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identification of data gaps and opportunities for additional monitoring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Development of KBRR research and monitoring plans for future years </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Response Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration with UAF: the marine research dive classes will be adding tunicate monitoring to their course work </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Will be developing a program collaboratively with Brenda Konar </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students will monitor Little Jackolof Bay annually </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. A Community Council Opportunity… <ul><li>Advocate for support of invasive species monitoring and a funding plan for the removal of species when they are 1 st identified! </li></ul><ul><li>Issues: </li></ul><ul><li>programs have limited funds to monitor for invasives </li></ul><ul><li>eradication programs are most effective when the foot print of the invader is small (i.e. prior to it being an economic stressor) </li></ul><ul><li>currently, there is not a funding source for the removal of small out breaks of invasives </li></ul>

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