U.S. Fair Trade At A Glance

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What are the principles of Fair Trade?
Who is buying Fair Trade Certified products?
What is the market overview of Fair Trade products and what are sample businesses and organizations?
How much has been certified for the US by Fair Trade USA?
What is the economic impact of sales of Fair Trade products in the US?
About Fair Trade USA

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  • Fair Trade offers a powerful way to reduce poverty through everyday shopping. The Fair Trade Certified™ label ensures consumers that the product purchased contains ingredients that have been sourced using strict Fair Trade—social, economic and environmental—standards.
  • 1 First year data for each product category may not be twelve months, depending on launch date. See product section for further details. 2 In 2009, Fair Trade USA began certifying small volumes of sports balls, olive oil, quinoa, brazil nuts, and shea butter. See New Products section for additional volume details. 3 2004-2009 figures represent an estimate of the volume of cocoa beans necessary to produce the Fair Trade Certified cocoa that was imported by U.S. licensees. 2002-2003 volumes represent the total volumes of finished cocoa products imported. 4 2009 rice figure includes an additional 890,601 pounds of rice that were not accounted for in 2008 volumes. 5 Variety of produce certified. See product section for further details. 6 2006-2008 figures represent vanilla only. 2009 figure includes both vanilla and spices. 7 Unit measure for flowers is stems. 8 Unit measure for wine is 750 ml bottles, was previously reported in liters. Source: Fair Trade USA
  • 1 Additional Income calculation methodology varies by product. For products excluding coffee and cocoa, Additional Income is the value of the premium paid. In the cases of coffee and cocoa, Additional Income takes into account the price paid above the market or farm gate rate, in addition to the premium. 2 2001 tea figure includes income generated from tea certified in the second half of 2000. 3 2009 rice figure includes an additional $16,350 in producer premium not accounted for in 2008 figures. 4 2004-2005 produce figures only include Additional Income to banana producers. 5 2006-2008 figures represent vanilla only. 2009 figure includes vanilla and other spices. 6 New Products certified in 2009 include sports balls, olive oil, quinoa, brazil nuts, and shea butter. Source: TransFair USA, ICE Market
  • U.S. Fair Trade At A Glance

    1. 1. U.S. Fair Trade at a Glance<br />Highlights of Imports & Impact of Fair Trade<br />
    2. 2. About Fair Trade<br />Fair Trade Principles<br /><ul><li>Fair price and credit
    3. 3. Fair labor conditions
    4. 4. Direct trade
    5. 5. Democratic and transparent organizations
    6. 6. Community development
    7. 7. Environmental sustainability</li></li></ul><li>Empowering Consumers to Giveback<br />~ Every Purchase Matters ~<br /><ul><li> More than three-fourths or 76% of consumers consider environmental and social aspects </li></ul> when purchasing decisions (Hartman Group, 2009)<br /><ul><li> Consumers familiar with Fair Trade label: 29% (50% among Ethical Consumers)
    8. 8. Percentage of above consumers who trust the Fair Trade Certified label: 87% </li></li></ul><li>Fair Trade Market Overview<br />Major Fair Trade Products<br />New Products<br />
    9. 9. Fair Trade Market Overview<br />Sample International Businesses<br />Sample 100% Organizations<br />
    10. 10. U.S. Fair Trade at a Glance<br />Source: Fair Trade USA 2009 Almanac <br />Imports of Fair Trade Certified Products into the US in Pounds, 1998 – 2009<br />Annual growth Fair Trade sales 2008-2009: 7% <br />
    11. 11. U.S. Fair Trade at a Glance<br />Source: Fair Trade USA 2009 Almanac <br />Estimated Additional Income to Farmers & Producer Organizations, 1998 – 2009<br />
    12. 12. Impact at a Glance<br />U.S. Fair Trade Sales Impact:<br />Fair Trade farmer and worker organizations <br /> (end 2009): 865<br /> Individual farmers and workers: more than 1.2 <br /> million<br /> Beneficiaries (producers + family members): <br /> more than 5 million<br /> Estimated Fair Trade premium paid for <br /> community development in 2009: $14 million <br /> Estimated Fair Trade retail sales 2009: <br /> $1.2 billion<br /> Additional Income generated for farmers and <br /> workers since U.S. Fair Trade began (11 years): <br />~ $200 million<br />
    13. 13. About Fair Trade<br />Fair Trade USA<br /> <br />Fair Trade USA (formerly named TransFair USA) is the leading independent, third-party certifier of Fair Trade products in the United States. Fair Trade USA audits and certifies transactions between U.S. companies that offer Fair Trade Certified products and their international suppliers to guarantee compliance with Fair Trade principles. <br /> <br />Every Purchase Matters<br />The Fair Trade Certified™ label offers consumers a simple way to know that their products were produced in a socially-responsible manner. The third-party verification guarantees that strict social, economic and environmental standards have been met.<br />

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