ITE - Chapter 3

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ITE - Chapter 3

  1. 1. IT Essentials PC Hardware and Software 4.1 Instructional Resource Chapter 3: Computer Assembly – Step By StepPresentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 1
  2. 2. Chapter 3: Objectives  Open the case.  Install the power supply.  Attach the components to the motherboard and install the motherboard.  Install internal drives.  Install drives in external bays.  Install adapter cards.  Connect all internal cables.  Re-attach the side panels and connect external cables to the computer.  Boot the computer for the first time.Presentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 2
  3. 3. Chapter 3: Critical Concepts  What is this chapter about and why is it important?  This chapter demonstrates the step-by-step procedure for assembling a desktop computer. It provides detailed graphics showing the proper installation procedure for each component of the computer. Where appropriate, this chapter explains other methods of component installation. Hands-on labs allow the student to assemble a computer with an emphasis on safe practices.  This chapter is important because it gives students the opportunity to learn about all of the components of a desktop computer and has them assemble one in a lab. The chapters and labs that follow Chapter 3 build on this basic knowledge of the computer. For those students who do not have access to a physical desktop computer in the lab, Chapter 3 also provides a Virtual Desktop. The Virtual Desktop labs demonstrate desktop assembly through animation and student interaction.Presentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 3
  4. 4. Chapter 3: Activities  What activities are associated with this chapter? 3.2: Lab: Install the Power Supply 3.2 Optional Activity: Virtual Desktop – Power Supply 3.3.3: Lab: Install the Motherboard 3.3.3: Optional Activity: Virtual Desktop – Motherboard 3.4: Optional Activity: Virtual Desktop – Internal Drives 3.5.2: Lab: Install the Drives 3.5.2: Optional Activity: Virtual Desktop – Drives in External Bays 3.6.3: Lab: Install Adapter Cards 3.6.3: Optional Activity: Virtual Desktop – Adapter Cards 3.7.2: Lab: Install Internal Cables 3.7.2: Optional Activity: Virtual Desktop – Internal Cables 3.8.2: Lab: Complete the Computer Assembly 3.8.2: Optional Activity: Virtual Desktop – External Cables 3.9.2: Lab: Boot the Computer Chapter 3 QuizPresentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 4
  5. 5. Chapter 3: New Terms  What terms are introduced in this chapter? AC power cord 3.8.2 Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) 3.6.3 Advanced Technology Extended (ATX) power connector 3.7.1 boot 3.9 CMOS battery 3.9.2 Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) 3.9.2 floppy data cable 3.7.2 floppy drive cable 3.7.2 Power-On Self-Test (POST) 3.9 standoff 3.3.3Presentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 5
  6. 6. Chapter 3: Changes  What has changed from the previous version (4.0) of ITEPC? No changes were made to this chapter.Presentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 6
  7. 7. Chapter 3: Classroom Management  Disassemble the computer in a step by step process, keeping the students moving through the process together. For example, everyone takes the cover off after the instructor has explained the problems associated with the case. Then move on to the next part to be removed. Reassembly works best if you allow the students to work at their own pace.  If disassembling the computer in teams, rotate to the next team member every five minutes. The teacher might want to control the rotation to ensure hands-on time for each student.  Students that finish quickly should help others troubleshoot issues.  Do an Internet search on the keywords how to build a computer and find good and bad points to demonstrate in class.Presentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 7
  8. 8. Chapter 3: Teaching Analogies  Computer reassembly is like a jigsaw puzzle. All the pieces fit nicely together to make a nice picture when done properly. You cannot force a puzzle piece or a computer component into the wrong spot.Presentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 8
  9. 9. Chapter 3: Suggested Class Discussions  Describe something you have disassembled and the reassembly did not go very well. Tell us what happened.  What do you do when you drop a screw?  What do you do if you have parts left over?  Why are BIOS beep codes and text messages important to a technician?  What is important about pin 1 on a cable or connector?  What happens when screws are too tight?  What kind of damage can ESD cause to computer components?Presentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 9
  10. 10. Chapter 3: Best Practices  Allow students to troubleshoot their own computer reassembly problems. Put the student name(s) on computers that do not work and have them continue troubleshooting the computer problems during the next class period.  Stress cleanliness in the work area by putting away tools and straightening cables.  Keep broken equipment separated from components that work; have boxes for each category if possible.  If the class time is limited, integrate chapters 3 and 4. Students do preventive maintenance at the same time as disassembly/reassembly.Presentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 10
  11. 11. Presentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 11
  12. 12. Presentation_ID © 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 12

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