CCNA Discovery 4 - Chapter 7

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CCNA Discovery 4 - Chapter 7

  1. 1. Prototyping the Campus Network Designing and Supporting Computer Networks – Chapter 7Version 4.0 © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 1
  2. 2. Objectives Describe the purpose for and procedures to build a prototype of the network design Create test plans to perform simulated or prototype test of important design elements Perform proof-of-concept tests on LAN design elements Identify risks and weaknesses in the design based on the proof-of-concept test conclusions © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 2
  3. 3. Describe the Purpose for and Procedures to Build a Prototype of the Network Design  Prototype network: a separate network built to replicate only the portion of a network necessary to test particular functions or capabilities  Pilot network: using a portion of an existing network to test a new functionality or capability © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 3
  4. 4. Describe the Purpose for and Procedures to Build a Prototype of the Network Design  Create a test plan before beginning the testing process  Create a test plan document containing descriptions of the design and topology, test procedures, and anticipated results © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 4
  5. 5. Describe the Purpose for and Procedures to Build a Prototype of the Network Design Methods to verify that a design meets the identified business criteria:  Prototyping  Basic connectivity tests  Functionality testing  Checklists © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 5
  6. 6. Describe the Purpose for and Procedures to Build a Prototype of the Network Design Tools and methods used to validate that the design is working as anticipated:  Cisco IOS commands  IP utilities and tools  Protocol analyzers  Network simulation tools © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 6
  7. 7. Describe the Purpose for and Procedures to Build a Prototype of the Network Design Test the redundancy and resiliency of a specific network design:  Overcoming device and link failures  Redundant links  Load balancing © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 7
  8. 8. Describe the Purpose for and Procedures to Build a Prototype of the Network Design  Identify what represents a risk or weakness in the design © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 8
  9. 9. Prototype the Hierarchical Network, Routing Protocol, and IP Addressing Model Identify goals and requirements met by LAN design:  Testing the new design  Determining what needs to be tested © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 9
  10. 10. Prototype the Hierarchical Network, Routing Protocol, and IP Addressing Model Create the test plan:  List test outcomes that support business goals  Provide a checklist of success criteria © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 10
  11. 11. Prototype the Hierarchical Network, Routing Protocol, and IP Addressing Model  Develop methodologies for comparing devices and topologies © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 11
  12. 12. Prototype the Hierarchical Network, Routing Protocol, and IP Addressing Model  Develop methodologies for validating the choice of routing protocol © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 12
  13. 13. Prototype the Hierarchical Network, Routing Protocol, and IP Addressing Model  Apply and test an appropriate addressing scheme © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 13
  14. 14. Prototype the Hierarchical Network, Routing Protocol, and IP Addressing ModelCompare and analyze risks or weaknesses associated with choosing LAN devices, topologies, and addressing: Lack of redundancy Single ISP for Internet connectivity Limited bandwidth areas Limited fiber connectivity © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 14
  15. 15. Prototype the Server Farm, Including Security and High Availability  Identify the business goals and technical requirements supporting server relocation to a data center including a server farm. © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 15
  16. 16. Prototype the Server Farm, Including Security and High Availability  Create a success criteria checklist to support business goals and technical requirements for the server farm © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 16
  17. 17. Prototype the Server Farm, Including Security and High Availability Develop methodologies for comparing devices and topologies:  Creating a baseline  LAN simulation with specific protocols (PVRST+) © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 17
  18. 18. Prototype the Server Farm, Including Security and High Availability Prototype the server farm, validating security and availability:  Availability requirements  Multilayer security  Firewalls  ACL design © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 18
  19. 19. Prototype the Server Farm, Including Security and High Availability  Build and analyze the prototype of the LAN to ensure business goals and technical requirements have been met © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 19
  20. 20. Prototype the Server Farm, Including Security and High Availability  Compare and analyze the risks or weaknesses associated with choosing server farm devices, topologies, and addressing © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 20
  21. 21. Summary The decision to create a prototype or pilot network depends on the type of testing required and the potential disruption to the existing network. Before beginning any testing, a test plan should be developed. Prototypes and simulations can be used to identify risks and areas of weakness in the network design. © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 21
  22. 22. © 2006 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Public 22

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