Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
TIPS TO STAY SAFE
AND RESPONSIBLE ON
SOCIAL MEDIA
Kaylie West
Ben Thomas
Avoid posting inappropriate photos
• On almost every source regarding the
subject of what not to do on social media,
this ...
Avoid swearing or using inappropriate
language
• According to TIME Magazine, 47% of Facebook users
have profanity on their...
Keep your opinions to yourself
• If your going to vent about your job, do not do it on social
media.
• Here are a few inst...
Do not disclose your location
• It’s natural for us to want to post about our
vacation or a cool business trip to make
fri...
Never add a phone number or address
• It is a terrible idea to include any of this personal
information on any social medi...
Avoid giving password clues
• On social media platforms, users share full names, dates,
places of birth, and even financia...
Never fully rely on privacy settings
• Although social media sites do offer privacy settings, keep
in mind that your frien...
Be careful with what you “like” and share
• In just a few minutes, the things you post,
share, and “like” can reveal the w...
Consider having separate personal and
professional accounts on social media
• As we become business professionals and star...
Finally…
• Use your best judgment when posting, sharing, and liking
content on social media.
• This content paints a pictu...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Tips to stay safe and responsible on social media

Important information for college students to know when dealing with various social media platforms both personally and professionally.

  • Login to see the comments

Tips to stay safe and responsible on social media

  1. 1. TIPS TO STAY SAFE AND RESPONSIBLE ON SOCIAL MEDIA Kaylie West Ben Thomas
  2. 2. Avoid posting inappropriate photos • On almost every source regarding the subject of what not to do on social media, this is listed as number one! Rule of thumb: if you would be embarrassed if your mom or dad saw it, don’t post it! • The Society for Human Resource Management stated in their 2014 study that 77% of companies will use social networking sites to screen candidates, and 51% admitted that they had turned down candidates for what they found on social media. • When the HR manager of the company of your dreams Googles your name, what will come up?
  3. 3. Avoid swearing or using inappropriate language • According to TIME Magazine, 47% of Facebook users have profanity on their walls. • A Dallas 6th grade teacher was fired for using the B-word in a photo comment on Facebook to her best friend. Is this too much? • Rule of thumb: it doesn’t matter if the boss you have now wouldn’t care about the use of profanity, but what about your future bosses?
  4. 4. Keep your opinions to yourself • If your going to vent about your job, do not do it on social media. • Here are a few instances that were listed on Huffington Post: • Jason Liptow, a professor at a Michigan community college was fired after using a failing student as a cautionary tale in a Facebook post. • Christine Rubino, a New York teacher fired for joking about drowning her students in a post on Facebook. • Dawnmarie Souza, a medical technician, was fired after bashing her boss on Facebook by comparing him to a “psychiatric patient” • Cameron Jankowski, a Taco Bell employee in Fort Wayne, Indiana, was fired after posting a picture on Twitter of him urinating on an order of Nachos that a Hispanic customer had requested because he “hated the Spaniards” .
  5. 5. Do not disclose your location • It’s natural for us to want to post about our vacation or a cool business trip to make friends and family back home jealous, we’ve all done it. But this can also make you a target for burglars. • David Walsh, chief executive of the security monitoring service Netwatch, shared with International Business Times that there has been an increase in theft due to burglars using social media accounts. • He recommends “reverse stalking yourself”. • Look at the information that you share on social media and see if you would be able to discover where you live or where you have been traveling.
  6. 6. Never add a phone number or address • It is a terrible idea to include any of this personal information on any social media account because you are potentially asking for prank callers, stalkers, scammers, and identity thieves who would love to use this information against you. • A security researcher, Reza Moaiandin, presented a study where he wrote a program to generate every possible number in the U.S., U.K., and Canada, then submitted those numbers to Facebook and received millions of profiles that had poor privacy settings. • Basically, if he wanted to, he could have turned around and sold that information on the black market to hackers who build and sell “fullz” or packages of identity information.
  7. 7. Avoid giving password clues • On social media platforms, users share full names, dates, places of birth, and even financial or employment information. • What people don’t know is, these things can be used by hackers to figure out important information such as passwords to important accounts. • IdentityProtection.com suggests: • Avoid sharing information that could be the answer to a security question or password reminder prompt. • Have separate and strong passwords for every account
  8. 8. Never fully rely on privacy settings • Although social media sites do offer privacy settings, keep in mind that your friends can share or repost something that was intended for their eyes only, and their privacy might be set to “public”. • As stated in the Houston Chronicle, new features that social media platforms implement can open up loopholes that allow people to view content that you have opted for them not to see. • Regularly check your privacy settings to ensure that nothing has been altered, and better yet, just don’t post anything that you are unsure about.
  9. 9. Be careful with what you “like” and share • In just a few minutes, the things you post, share, and “like” can reveal the way you really see the world. • Fair or not, you’re considered “guilty by association” when people see things on your social media profiles that they don’t like or happen to disagree with. These people could be an HR manager at the company you’re interviewing with or a potential boss. • On the website Rick’s Daily Tips, which gives computer tips, tricks, and tutorials, he discusses the importance of hiding your “likes” in your settings just to be on the safe side.
  10. 10. Consider having separate personal and professional accounts on social media • As we become business professionals and start to use social media to promote our organization and/or professional services, it might be a good idea to separate business and pleasure. • According to FastCompany.com, having separate accounts gives you the convenience of being able to post what you want on your personal account, while remaining focused and professional on your business account.
  11. 11. Finally… • Use your best judgment when posting, sharing, and liking content on social media. • This content paints a picture of who you are, and you never know how another person will perceive it. • Just be SMART!

×