Prototyping for insructional design

1,529 views

Published on

Published in: Design
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,529
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
453
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Prototyping for insructional design

    1. 1. Prototypingfor InstructionalDesignKayla T. OrtonUniversity of Houston Clear Lake
    2. 2. What Is Prototyping? • A blueprint for organizing instructional notes and training materials • A sequence of drawings and text that depicts conceptual ideas and the flow of informationPrototyping for Instructional Design
    3. 3. Why Prototype? • think through each page or screen • plan out the content details • visualize and convey learner content before investing a large amount of time or moneyPrototyping for Instructional Design in the final product
    4. 4. Two Basic MethodsPrototyping for Instructional Design StoryBoarding Rapid Prototyping
    5. 5. StoryBoarding
    6. 6. Storyboarding • Development phase of the Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement and Evaluate (ADDIE) process (Malamed, 2012) • First crafted at Walt Disney Studio in the 1930’sPrototyping for Instructional Design
    7. 7. Storyboarding Execution • Post-it handwritten notes or sketches on a sheet of paper • Adobe Illustrator, Word, Powerpoint, other design programs • Each page or slide represents one screenPrototypinginstructional product Design of the final for Instructional
    8. 8. Benefits • Develop effective learner content in sequence • Work out the content details before production phase. • Present ideas to the internal team or stakeholders • Make recommended changes before a largePrototyping for Instructional Design time investment
    9. 9. Rapid Prototyping
    10. 10. Rapid Prototyping • Also called: – Spiral Method – Iterative Design • Uses: – Non-linear productsPrototyping for Instructional Design – Interactive online instructional materials – Learner/choice guided materials
    11. 11. Rapid Prototyping • Repetitive implementation-evaluation cycle • Allows the instructional product to be constantly tested, reviewed and enhanced, beginning early on in the ADDIE process (Malamed, 2012).Prototyping for Instructional Design
    12. 12. Rapid Prototyping Execution • Paper and pen as initial mediums • Electronic mediums as product development progresses and user-interface is improved (Culata, 2011) • Utilize actual authoring software: – PowerpointPrototyping for Instructional Design – Articulate – Captivate
    13. 13. Benefits • Evaluate the product throughout the product life cycle • Test preliminary training programs • Provide stakeholders with a realistic mock up of the final product • Shorten product production time:Prototyping for Instructional Design – resolve design/interface issues early on • Save time and money
    14. 14. Summary • Carefully organize your sequence of contextual text and images • Effectively convey your strategy and concepts to: – team members – stakeholders – test usersPrototyping for before production Design • Work out details Instructional • Create a cost-effective, improved end product
    15. 15. References Culata, R. (2011). Storyboarding. Retrieved from http://www.instructionaldesign.org/storyboarding.html Culata, R. (2011). Rapid Prototyping. Retrieved from http://www.instructionaldesign.org/models/rapid_prototyping.html Instructional Technology/Instructional Design/Rapid Prototyping (2011). Retrieved from http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Instructional_Technology/Instructional_Design/Rapid_ Prototyping Malamed, C. (2012). Storyboards for eLearning. Retrieved from http://theelearningcoach.com/elearning_design/storyboards-for-elearning/Prototyping for Instructional Design Wakefield, J. (2008). Storyboarding. Retrieved from http://jenny.wakefield.net/instruction/instructional-design/design2/storyboarding.html

    ×