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Smart City - Coping with Complexity

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The Smart City offers a wealth of opportunities for businesses, citizens, academia, culture, governments and many more. This raises some questions about which opportunities to pursue, which policies to implement and how to leverage the new capabilities for the good of the city and it's constituents. Current Smart City benchmarks try to shed some light on this question but usually fall short in certain areas (e.g. culture, logistic) and have difficulties to cope with the complexity of a city as a whole. Breaking the city down into smaller units (quarters, squares) and deconstructing the verticals in a way that interdisciplinary dependencies become manageable and measurable will help to operationalise insights and methods from benchmarking to become part of day to day city development.

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Smart City - Coping with Complexity

  1. 1. September 2016 SMART CITY 1 Smart City !? KAY HARTKOPF, FOUNDER@URBANDIGITS EMAIL: KAY.HARTKOPF@URBANDIGITS.NET
  2. 2. September 2016 SMART CITY 2 Mobility Energy Safety Culture Health Education Government Smart City
  3. 3. September 2016 SMART CITY 3 SWITCHH Intermodal Mobility KATWARN Disaster Alert SCHOOL PLATFORM Access to GLAM Collections YOINTS Loyalty at the Point of Sale Smart City SMART HOME Connected Sensor Home INTELLIGENT ROAD HOSPITAL SCHOOLING Remote Classroom for Patients FINDING PLACES Citizen Participation Smart City – Key Characteristics: • Mobile access to information everywhere • Ubiquitous artificial intelligence and cognitive computing • Vast number of devices producing massive data streams • Integrated cross domain digitally enabled services • Immersive human digital interfaces and digital signage  Significant challenges for society and governments
  4. 4. September 2016 SMART CITY 4 Smart City !? Coping with complexity Connecting the dots Smart what? Measuring success
  5. 5. September 2016 SMART CITY Chart-Nr. 5 Smart City Hot Spots Smart Squares
  6. 6. September 2016 SMART CITY Chart-Nr. 6
  7. 7. © urbandigits2016 Setting the Goals for the Smart City (AG HH 2.030 – Hamburg Chamber of Commerce) SMART CITY Chart-Nr. 7September 2016 Best Practices Vision/ Future Smart City KPIs/ Index Pilot Projects Sectors • Retail • Logistics • Culture • …
  8. 8. © urbandigits2016 Smart City Benchmarking (1) (AG HH 2.030 – Hamburg Chamber of Commerce) SMART CITY Chart-Nr. 8September 2016 Charakteristik IDC (2012) TU Wien (2007-14) ECIS (2014) IPOL (2014) Morgenstadt (2014) Anzahl Städte 52 (D) 70 (EU) 10 (Welt) 37 (EU) 6 (Welt) Fokus digitale Services ja nein nein ja nein Methodik 65 Indikat. 74 Indikat. Success Factors Reifegrad Projekte 108 Indikat. Messwerte/KPIs z.T. ja exemplarisch z.T. ja Dimensionen Government Mobility Energy&Env. Buildings Services Governance Mobility Environment People Living Economy Governance Mobility Energy Environment People Lifestye Economy Technology Aufbauend auf TU Wien, d.h. gleiche Kategorien Government Mobility Energy Water Safety IT Best Practices wenig nein ja ja ja Primärerhebung nein nein nein nein ja Struktur. Empfehlungen ja nein ja ja ja Rank #1 Hamburg Luxemburg n.a. Amsterdam n.a. Ranking Hamburg 1 nicht dabei n.a. 4 n.a.
  9. 9. © urbandigits2016 Smart City Benchmarking (2) (AG HH 2.030 – Hamburg Chamber of Commerce) SMART CITY Chart-Nr. 9September 2016 Thema IDC (2012) TU Wien (2007- 14) ECIS (2014) IPOL (2014) Morgenstadt (2014) Handel Nicht vorhanden - Wird nicht erwähnt und ist nicht Teil der Studie. Indirekt vorhanden - Smart Economy nicht in Branchen herunter- gebrochen Indirekt vorhanden - Smart Economy nicht in Branchen herunter- gebrochen rudimentär vorhanden - Einige Beispiele enthalten Aspekte insbesondere ePayment Nicht vorhanden - Logistik Nicht Vorhanden - Smart Mobility bezieht sich nur auf Personen-transport Nicht Vorhanden - Smart Mobility bezieht sich nur auf Personen-transport Nicht Vorhanden - Smart Mobility bezieht sich nur auf Personen-transport Indirekt vorhanden - Intelligent Traffic Systems beziehen Logistik mit ein Vorhanden - Production & Logistics, Beispiel Tokio Kultur Nicht vorhanden - Keine Hinweise. Vorhanden - Smart Living/Cultural Facilities (Museen, Theater, Kinos) Smart People/Creativity Indirekt vorhanden - Lifestyle und People repräsentieren Teile von Kultur rudimentär vorhanden - Verweis auf Dublin Nicht vorhanden -
  10. 10. September 2016 SMART CITY 10 KAY HARTKOPF, FOUNDER EMAIL: KAY.HARTKOPF@URBANDIGITS.NET +49 170 2982 190 URBANIGITS STEINBEKER MARKTSTRAßEE 9 22117 HAMBURG GERMANY

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