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STAYING Alive AND WELLCHILD HEALTH AND DISASTERRISK REDUCTION
Dr. Kathleen SkinnerConsultant SCF-UKkathleenskinner@yahoo.com
What isDRR?
May 2012 BBC news                    “Following a 6.0-magnitude                    earthquake that rocked north-east      ...
Disaster Risk Reduction•   Is everyone’s responsibility across all sectors•   Before, during and after disasters•   Throug...
Disaster Risk Reduction• Saves Lives• Minimises the impact of disasters• Increases the resilience of the health system at ...
DRR is any activity that helps...•   Prepare•   Mitigate•   Adapt•   Increase resilience
Child Health and DRR              •   Children are vulnerable              •   Children are capable              •   Child...
Key points             • By 2015, 175 million               children affected by               disasters             • Num...
Then (1950s)                  NowUnder-reporting of           More complete recordingdisastersCounting only direct        ...
Group Work: What is DRR?•   Understanding DRR•   Defining key terms and concepts•   Feedback to large group•   Exercise 1
Defining Terms• Feedback from groups
Disaster RiskDisaster risk = Hazard (exposure) x Vulnerability                         Capacity
Types of Hazards                                             terrorist  Rapid  onset               earthquake             ...
Vulnerability...the potential to suffer harm or loss, related to the    capacity to anticipate a hazard, cope with it, res...
Physical dimensions                 Intensity                          Exposed                                 Age of the ...
Capacitythe ability to anticipate, cope with, resist and recover  from hazard impactsthe combination of all the strengths,...
ResilienceResilience is the capacity of a system, community or  society potentially exposed to hazards to adapt, by  resis...
Disasterthe occurrence of an extreme hazard event that  impacts on vulnerable communities, causing  substantial damage, di...
Risk hierarchy                                    Extreme but               EQ               EQ                   infreque...
Disasters: a development concern                          DEVELOPMENT REALM                   Development        Developme...
Risk Reduction - examples•   Physical measures•   Socio-economic measures•   Environmental measures•   Management and inst...
Examples of DRR activities•   Early Warning systems•   Identifying potential hazards•   Building regulations for schools a...
Hazardous places are livelihood placesRisks and Benefits• Volcanic soils• Floods and soil fertility• Coasts for fishing• W...
Disaster RiskDisaster risk = Hazard (exposure) x Vulnerability                         Capacity
Introduction to child health and disaster risk reduction
Introduction to child health and disaster risk reduction
Introduction to child health and disaster risk reduction
Introduction to child health and disaster risk reduction
Introduction to child health and disaster risk reduction
Introduction to child health and disaster risk reduction
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Introduction to child health and disaster risk reduction

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Short Introductory overview of the concepts of Disaster Risk Reduction and impacts on Child Health. From DRR and Child Health Workshop Hyderabad India May 2012. First in a series of presentations that outline how to mainstream DRR into Child Health Programmes

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Introduction to child health and disaster risk reduction

  1. 1. STAYING Alive AND WELLCHILD HEALTH AND DISASTERRISK REDUCTION
  2. 2. Dr. Kathleen SkinnerConsultant SCF-UKkathleenskinner@yahoo.com
  3. 3. What isDRR?
  4. 4. May 2012 BBC news “Following a 6.0-magnitude earthquake that rocked north-east Italy on Sunday morning, around 3,000 residents of San Felipe and surrounding areas are living “like refugees” “The body of knowledge is very low in this culture. I would urge policy makers to push for education on hazards to begin at primary school, starting with lessons made by experts and for leaflets to be made and disseminated.” Local Expert
  5. 5. Disaster Risk Reduction• Is everyone’s responsibility across all sectors• Before, during and after disasters• Throughout the project cycle• Partnership working• Multisectoral coordination at all levels• Active participation of children
  6. 6. Disaster Risk Reduction• Saves Lives• Minimises the impact of disasters• Increases the resilience of the health system at all levels• Increases the resilience of children• Is cost effective
  7. 7. DRR is any activity that helps...• Prepare• Mitigate• Adapt• Increase resilience
  8. 8. Child Health and DRR • Children are vulnerable • Children are capable • Children are resilient • Children are active participants
  9. 9. Key points • By 2015, 175 million children affected by disasters • Number of disasters now 4x higher than the 1970s • Climate change increases the risk
  10. 10. Then (1950s) NowUnder-reporting of More complete recordingdisastersCounting only direct Quantifying indirect effectseffectsSmaller population of Larger population, greaterhazardous places densitiesLess inequality Growing inequality and marginalisationLess fixed capital at risk Accumulation of fixed capitalSimpler socio-economic More complex networksnetworks
  11. 11. Group Work: What is DRR?• Understanding DRR• Defining key terms and concepts• Feedback to large group• Exercise 1
  12. 12. Defining Terms• Feedback from groups
  13. 13. Disaster RiskDisaster risk = Hazard (exposure) x Vulnerability Capacity
  14. 14. Types of Hazards terrorist Rapid onset earthquake attack volcano chemical plane crash spill flood cyclone epidemic war onset Slow drought civil unrest famine
  15. 15. Vulnerability...the potential to suffer harm or loss, related to the capacity to anticipate a hazard, cope with it, resist it and recover from its impact.
  16. 16. Physical dimensions Intensity Exposed Age of the Frequency Technology population infrastructure Location Age and Exposure Sensitivity Demo- income of the graphy population Number Exposed Resources VULNERA- BILITY ResponseVulnerabilityVulnerability Level of• Dimensions• Dimensions education• Components• Components Capacity• Measures• Measures to adapt Management Access to structure Wealth and information and Information well being technology services Emergency plans
  17. 17. Capacitythe ability to anticipate, cope with, resist and recover from hazard impactsthe combination of all the strengths, attributes and resources that an individual, community or society has available
  18. 18. ResilienceResilience is the capacity of a system, community or society potentially exposed to hazards to adapt, by resisting or changing in order to reach and maintain an acceptable level of functioning and structure. (ISDR, 2004).
  19. 19. Disasterthe occurrence of an extreme hazard event that impacts on vulnerable communities, causing substantial damage, disruption and possible casualties, and leaving the affected communities unable to function normally without outside assistance.
  20. 20. Risk hierarchy Extreme but EQ EQ infrequent “Little we can do about them..” Severe Severe Damaging & within flood flood memory Tropical Land Tropical Land Flood Flood slide cyclones slide cyclones More common Fire Fire Drought Drought Everyday life: poverty, illness, Everyday life: poverty, illness,hunger, water, traffic accidentshunger, water, traffic accidents Priorities !
  21. 21. Disasters: a development concern DEVELOPMENT REALM Development DevelopmentNEGATIVE REALM POSITIVE REALM can increase can reduce vulnerability vulnerability Disasters can Disasters provide can set back development development opportunities DISASTER REALM 28
  22. 22. Risk Reduction - examples• Physical measures• Socio-economic measures• Environmental measures• Management and institutional• Post-disaster measures
  23. 23. Examples of DRR activities• Early Warning systems• Identifying potential hazards• Building regulations for schools and hospitals• Effective health systems• Legislation, policies, strategies and programmes…
  24. 24. Hazardous places are livelihood placesRisks and Benefits• Volcanic soils• Floods and soil fertility• Coasts for fishing• Water supplies and fault zonesLiving in dangerous places• are people forced?• do they choose? or a combination• do they have a different set of priorities?
  25. 25. Disaster RiskDisaster risk = Hazard (exposure) x Vulnerability Capacity

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