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Ebony Hutchin, Mat Grandin
& Katie Smith
 A mental illness
characterised by
feelings of fear
 Impacts 14% of
Australians, making
it the most common
mental illnes...
Summary
 Anxiety often
manifests through
behaviour
 Behaviours can be
both positive and
negative
 Avoidant behaviours
a...
Summary
 Reluctance to ask
for assistance,
elevated need for
verbal reassurance,
communication
apprehension.
 Higher ris...
Summary
 Anxiety disorders are
often exacerbated by a
sensory overload
 The smallest smells, sights
and sounds can over-...
Summary
 Trembling,
dizziness,
sweating, muscle
tension
 Comorbidity with
functional
semantic
syndromes
 Panic attacks
...
Summary
 Children with Anxiety
disorders often find
concentration
difficult in and
outside of the
classroom.
 Children w...
Summary
 Anxiety has no
direct bearing, but
cognitive
implications may
also impact here
 Decreased working
memory, fatig...
 Ameringen, M., Mancini, C., & Farvolden, P. (2003). The Impact of Anxiety Disorders on Educational Achievement. Journal ...
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EDUC3026 Slideshow - Anxiety

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EDUC3026 slideshow, Blackboard Learn, UoN, University of Newcastle, Special Education, EDUC3026 Slideshow - Anxiety

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EDUC3026 Slideshow - Anxiety

  1. 1. Ebony Hutchin, Mat Grandin & Katie Smith
  2. 2.  A mental illness characterised by feelings of fear  Impacts 14% of Australians, making it the most common mental illness  Between 2-9% of children have an anxiety disorder in Australia
  3. 3. Summary  Anxiety often manifests through behaviour  Behaviours can be both positive and negative  Avoidant behaviours are particularly common  All types of anxiety tend to impact upon social interaction. Teaching Strategies  Explicit instruction in self-regulation and other management strategies.  May require you to teach, or support what has been taught.  ‘Social Stories’ can be a helpful tool
  4. 4. Summary  Reluctance to ask for assistance, elevated need for verbal reassurance, communication apprehension.  Higher risk of remaining unnoticed  Lower perceived self-competence and temperamental flexibility Teaching Strategies  Communication books  Alternative communication strategies eg colour coded mood cards  Explicitly teach recognition of anxiety symptoms and strategies to communicate these feelings
  5. 5. Summary  Anxiety disorders are often exacerbated by a sensory overload  The smallest smells, sights and sounds can over- stimulate the senses.  Children with Anxiety disorders can be fearful of situations which may overload the senses. Teaching Strategies  Introduce student to safe sensory areas such as a sensory room, where a child can experience sensory stimulation on their own terms.  Create a seating plan for the student, such as away from windows, in order create a safe sensory environment.  Maintain a classroom environment without excessive sensory stimulation, such as too much noise.
  6. 6. Summary  Trembling, dizziness, sweating, muscle tension  Comorbidity with functional semantic syndromes  Panic attacks Teaching Strategies  Safe spaces  Stress management skills eg meditation and time management  Panic attack action plan
  7. 7. Summary  Children with Anxiety disorders often find concentration difficult in and outside of the classroom.  Children with Anxiety disorders regularly find remembering even basic instructions difficult.  Memory and concentration are both effected in similar ways. Teaching Strategies  Work with parents/guardians to create strategies to aid memory, such as reminders written in a diary.  Work one on one with student to create a more relaxed environment where concentration can become more organic and not so forced.  Planned rest breaks, to reduce cognitive overload, which allow students to employ anxiety reducing strategies and refocus their attention.
  8. 8. Summary  Anxiety has no direct bearing, but cognitive implications may also impact here  Decreased working memory, fatigue, work/school avoidance can all impact on literacy and numeracy Teaching Strategies  Explicit quality criteria and time frames  Explicit, accessible instructions  Instruction on managing anxiety  Intensive programs for improving foundational skills
  9. 9.  Ameringen, M., Mancini, C., & Farvolden, P. (2003). The Impact of Anxiety Disorders on Educational Achievement. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 17(5), 561 – 571.  Anxiety Disorders Association of British Columbia. (2012). Effective Communication: Improving Your Social Skills. Retrieved March 25, 2014, from http://www.anxietybc.com/self-help/effective-communication-improving-your-social-skills  Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2013). Mental Health. Retrieved March 14, 2014, fromhttp://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4125.0main+features3150Jan%202013  Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. (2012). Comorbidity of Mental Disorders and Physical Conditions 2007. Retrieved March 14, 2014, from http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737421146  Australian Psychological Society. (2014). Understanding and Managing Anxiety. Retrieved March 14, 2014, fromhttps://www.psychology.org.au/publications/tip_sheets/anxiety/  Barsky, A., & Borus, J. (1999). Functional Somatic Syndromes. Annals of Internal Medicine, 130(11), 910 – 921.  Beck, A. Emery, G. Greenberg, R. (1985) Anxiety disorders and phobias: A cognitive perspective. New York, Basic Books.  Beyond Blue. (2014). Anxiety. Retrieved March 14, 2014, from http://www.beyondblue.org.au/the-facts/anxiety  Early Childhood Australia. (2014). How Anxiety Problems Affect Children. Retrieved March 15, 2014, fromhttps://www.kidsmatter.edu.au/families/mental-health- difficulties/anxiety/anxiety-how-anxiety-problems-affect-children  Gale, C., & Davidson, O. (2007). Generalised Anxiety Disorder. British Medical Journal, 334(7593), 579 – 581.  Grimley, M., Dahraei, H. & Riding, R. J. (2008). The relationship between anxiety-stability, working memory and cognitive style. Educational Studies, 34(3), 213-223.  Gorman, J. (1998). Comorbid Depression and Anxiety Spectrum Disorders. Depression and Anxiety, 4(4), 160 – 168. doi: 10.1002/(SICI)1520-6394(1996)4:4<160::AID- DA2>3.0.CO;2-J  Kim, J., Szatmari, P., Bryson, S., Streiner, D., & Wilson, F. (2000). The Prevalence of Anxiety and Mood Problems among Children with Autism and Asperger Syndrome. Autism, 4(2), 117 – 132. doi: 10.1177/1362361300004002002  Messer, S., & Beidel, D. (1994). Psychosocial Correlates of Childhood Anxiety Disorders. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 33(7), 975 – 983.  Minahan, J. & Rappaport, N. (2012). Anxiety in Students:A Hidden Culprit in Behavior Issues. Phi Delta Kappan, 34-39.  Health Direct Australia. (2014). Anxiety. Retrieved April 3, 2014, from http://www.mindhealthconnect.org.au/anxiety?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Anxiety%20(P)&utm_term=anxiety%20disorders  McCroskey, J. (1992). Reliability and Validity of the Willingness to Communicate Scale. Communication Quarterly, 40(1), 16 – 25.  Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment. (2014). Managing Stress and Anxiety. Retrieved March 15, 2014, fromhttp://education.qld.gov.au/asd- online-resource-kit/schools/continuing-successfully/managing-stress.html  Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment. (2014). Information Sheet - Anxiety. Retrieved March 25, 2014, from http://education.qld.gov.au/studentservices/protection/mentalhealth/infosheets/anxiety.doc  SPD Life. (2010). SBAD: Sensory Based Anxiety Disorder. Retrieved April 3, 2014, from http://spdlife.org/symptoms/sensory-based-anxiety-disorder.html  The Gray Centre. (2014). What Are Social Stories. Retrieved March 24, 2014, from http://www.thegraycenter.org/social-stories/what-are-social-stories

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