Grammar 1 - Sentences

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Grammar 1 - Sentences

  1. 1. Grammar 1 Sentences
  2. 2. Complete Sentences <ul><li>A group of words that expresses a complete thought. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Subject </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Predicate </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Sentence Fragment <ul><li>Part of a sentence that is written as if it were a complete sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Missing a subject, a predicate, or both </li></ul>
  4. 4. Examples of Fragments <ul><li>Folk singers in the 1960s. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Missing predicate </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Folk singers in the 1960s recorded many classic songs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>sentence </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Examples of Fragments <ul><li>If you remember the words. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fragment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If you remember the words, you should sing along. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>sentence </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Examples of Fragments <ul><li>Colonists in Indian costume. (missing a predicate) </li></ul><ul><li>Dumped chests of tea into the harbor. (missing a subject) </li></ul><ul><li>On December 16, 1773. (missing both) </li></ul><ul><li>Colonists in Indian costume dumped chests of tea into Boston Harbor on December 16, 1773. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Run-On Sentence <ul><li>two or more sentences written as if they were a single sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>When you combine two sentences with a conjunction, use a comma before the conjunction. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Examples of Run-Ons <ul><li>Run-on The British tried to make the colonists pay taxes they resisted. </li></ul><ul><li>Revision The British tried to make the colonists pay taxes, but they resisted. </li></ul>
  9. 9. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>1. British soldiers marched toward Concord, Massachusetts. </li></ul>
  10. 10. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>2. They hoped to capture arms stored in Concord, Paul Revere and William Dawes raced to warn the colonists. </li></ul>
  11. 11. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>The Minutemen from nearby towns. </li></ul>
  12. 12. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>The Minutemen from nearby towns. </li></ul>
  13. 13. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Waited for the British in Lexington. </li></ul>
  14. 14. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Clashes in Lexington and Concord started the American Revolution. </li></ul>
  15. 15. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>George Washington became the army's commander-in-chief he took command on July 3, 1775. </li></ul>
  16. 16. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Poorly trained and without uniforms. </li></ul>
  17. 17. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>The Declaration of Independence was adopted on July 4, 1776 it was written by Thomas Jefferson. </li></ul>
  18. 18. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>A young officer, Nathan Hale. </li></ul>
  19. 19. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Hale was hanged by the British as a spy he became a hero to the Americans. </li></ul>
  20. 20. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>France joined the war as an ally of the Americans. </li></ul>
  21. 21. TRY IT! <ul><li>Use CS, F, or RO to identify the word group as a complete sentence, a fragment, or a run-on sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>The British were defeated at the battle of Yorktown it meant the end of the war. </li></ul>
  22. 22. Sentences <ul><li>4 types </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Declarative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interrogative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Imperative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exclamatory </li></ul></ul>
  23. 23. Declarative <ul><li>Expresses a statement </li></ul><ul><li>Ends with a period </li></ul><ul><li>i.e. A successful inventor must use </li></ul><ul><li>both knowledge and creativity </li></ul>
  24. 24. Interrogative <ul><li>Asks a question </li></ul><ul><li>Ends with a question mark </li></ul>Who invented the telephone?
  25. 25. Imperative <ul><li>Tells or asks someone to do something </li></ul><ul><li>Usually ends with a period but may end with an exclamation point </li></ul><ul><li>Name the inventor of the telegraph. Answer the question and win $1,000! </li></ul>
  26. 26. Exclamatory <ul><li>Shows strong feeling </li></ul><ul><li>It always ends with an exclamation point </li></ul><ul><li>I’m so glad I invented the computer! </li></ul>

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