Using Health Networks Effectively
Date: 08-04-2008
Kate Hawkins (IDS)

Wednesday 9 April 2008
What is a network?

                     The term network covers
                     a broad range of initiatives
       ...
Why use networks?



  Communication of research
  Stimulate health advocates
  Track emerging policy trends and opportuni...
The added value of networks

  The power of numbers
  The utilisation of others with complimentary skills
  e.g. advocacy
...
The challenges

  Buying into a common agenda and the dilution of
  positions – the ‘ouch’ factor
  Shaping information fo...
Exercise: Mapping existing national and
regional networks
Use the post it notes to write down the names of
national networ...
Examples of international networks
Health & Development Networks (HDN)
http://www.hdnet.org/v2/home/ is a leading facilita...
Examples of international networks
International Federation of Medical Students' Associations
http://www.ifmsa.org/ is a n...
Examples of international networks
EURONGOS http://www.eurongos.org/Default.aspx?ID=1473 The
European NGOs for Sexual and ...
Examples of international networks
The Association for Women's Rights in Development (AWID)
http://www.awid.org/go.php?pg=...
Parliamentary engagement and networks


Role of parliamentarians:
   Domestic health and development policy
   Engagement ...
Your work with parliamentarians and elected
representatives



 How have you decided which politicians to work
 with?
 Wha...
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Using Health Networks Effectively

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This presentation was given by Kate Hawkins, Institute of Development Studies, at a capacity building workshop on research communication in April 2008.

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Using Health Networks Effectively

  1. 1. Using Health Networks Effectively Date: 08-04-2008 Kate Hawkins (IDS) Wednesday 9 April 2008
  2. 2. What is a network? The term network covers a broad range of initiatives where a number of organisations or individuals cooperate to strengthen each other and achieve greater impact through a shared agenda of action and reflection. Networks are based on the assumption that together we can do more and amplify our voices.
  3. 3. Why use networks? Communication of research Stimulate health advocates Track emerging policy trends and opportunities Influence policy makers Attract media interest Inform health professionals & development practitioners Attract financing Mobilise the public
  4. 4. The added value of networks The power of numbers The utilisation of others with complimentary skills e.g. advocacy The opportunity to piggyback on the events and activities of others The ability to track policy processes with minimal effort Building public profile and authority
  5. 5. The challenges Buying into a common agenda and the dilution of positions – the ‘ouch’ factor Shaping information for the user Give a little to get a little... Additional work Information overload Speed decision making
  6. 6. Exercise: Mapping existing national and regional networks Use the post it notes to write down the names of national networks that you either belong to, or know of, at country (national and sub national) or regional level. Please include one sentence that explains the purpose of the network. When you are finished please attach the post it note to whichever category suits the network best. You can choose from: Governmental Academic Civil society Media
  7. 7. Examples of international networks Health & Development Networks (HDN) http://www.hdnet.org/v2/home/ is a leading facilitator of information, dialogue and advocacy approaches on HIV and TB. It operates via email journalistic style articles that often prompt email debates. It has issue specific and regional lists. It is free. Healthcare Information for All by 2015 http://www.ghi-net.org is a network of healthcare providers, producers of health reference and learning materials, librarians and information professionals, health researchers, policymakers, development workers and the general public. That works internationally, regionally and nationally. HIFA2015 harnesses experience and expertise to create a web- based resource specifically about information needs and different methods to meet those needs. HIFA2015 promotes the development of evidence-based information for advocates to prompt political and financial commitment to health. It is free.
  8. 8. Examples of international networks International Federation of Medical Students' Associations http://www.ifmsa.org/ is a network of students that aims to offer future physicians a comprehensive introduction to global health issues. Through their programming and opportunities, they develop culturally sensitive students of medicine, intent on influencing the trans-national inequalities that shape the health of our planet. The People´s Health Movement (PHM) http://phmovement.org/cms/ has its roots in the grassroots people's movement and owes its genesis to many health networks and activists who have been concerned by the growing inequities in health over the last 25 years. The PHM calls for a revitalisation of the principles of the Alma-Ata Declaration which promised Health for All by the year 2000 and complete revision of international and domestic policy that has shown to impact negatively on health status and systems.
  9. 9. Examples of international networks EURONGOS http://www.eurongos.org/Default.aspx?ID=1473 The European NGOs for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, Population and Development seek to translate the commitments of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) into international cooperative programmes in the field of sexual and reproductive health in low-income countries. It runs European and International lists on which relevant research can be posted and upcoming policy opportunities are highlighted. International Treatment Preparedness Coalition http://www.hivcollaborativefund.org/index.php?id=117 ITPC is a worldwide coalition of people living with HIV/AIDS and their advocates. The ITPC advocates for universal and free access to treatment for AIDS for all HIV+ people and greater input from HIV+ people in decisions that affect their lives. We work to achieve these goals at the local, regional and international level. Their listserve also covers many emerging issues in health system strengthening.
  10. 10. Examples of international networks The Association for Women's Rights in Development (AWID) http://www.awid.org/go.php?pg=about is an international membership organization connecting, informing and mobilizing people and organizations committed to achieving gender equality, sustainable development and women's human rights. Their goal is to cause policy, institutional and individual change that will improve the lives of women and girls everywhere. They do this by facilitating ongoing debates on fundamental and provocative issues as well as by building the individual and organizational capacities of those working for women's empowerment and social justice. Networking is achieved through strategic communications e-forums and their conference.
  11. 11. Parliamentary engagement and networks Role of parliamentarians: Domestic health and development policy Engagement in international policy processes Relationship and partnership building Targeting decision makers (ministers, constituency MPs, special interest groups, new politicians, elections, political parties and their internal networks) Understanding the policy cycle Tracking debates, reviews and new policy Prompting new policies Shaping evidence
  12. 12. Your work with parliamentarians and elected representatives How have you decided which politicians to work with? What methods have you used to communicate with them? What are the challenges of this work? Where have you been successful?

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