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Masculinities and HIV at IDS Reflections from Dakar on mobilising Men and Boys   Jerker Edstrom, Aug 2008
Masculinities - beyond the personal <ul><li>First stage was an International symposium with 41 participants from 5 regions...
 
Why ‘politicising beyond the personal’? <ul><li>Much of the most innovative work on men and masculinities has worked at th...
<ul><li>Within gender and development, the ‘men as the problem; women as victims’ discourse continues to hold sway – and t...
Participants  <ul><li>Academics  (e.g. R Connell, A Cornwall, M Silberschmidt, R Morrell)  </li></ul><ul><li>Programme  im...
Questions and reflections in Dakar <ul><li>Anxieties around the need to conform and perform around sex, pose risks to cond...
Some suggested strategies for action <ul><li>Re-orient and politicise existing work with men on gender from workshops and ...
Follow up activities <ul><li>Symposium Report  </li></ul><ul><li>IDS ‘In Focus’ Policy Briefing: Men, Sex and HIV: Directi...
<ul><li>Thankyou! </li></ul>
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Masculinities and HIV at IDS: Reflections from Dakar on mobilising Men and Boys

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Presentation given at the 2008 International AIDS Conference on Masculinities
www.realising-rights.org

Published in: Health & Medicine
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Masculinities and HIV at IDS: Reflections from Dakar on mobilising Men and Boys

  1. 1. Masculinities and HIV at IDS Reflections from Dakar on mobilising Men and Boys Jerker Edstrom, Aug 2008
  2. 2. Masculinities - beyond the personal <ul><li>First stage was an International symposium with 41 participants from 5 regions, in Dakar, Senegal, Oct 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>The symposium considered </li></ul><ul><ul><li>current constraints in HIV, gender and sexual health and rights work with men </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>challenges and limitations in current gender theory for improving such work and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>potentials for engaging a broader range of men more politically in sexual health, rights and struggles for gender equity </li></ul></ul>
  3. 4. Why ‘politicising beyond the personal’? <ul><li>Much of the most innovative work on men and masculinities has worked at the level of the personal – e.g. men’s behaviour </li></ul><ul><li>Realisation that HIV prevention and sexual and reproductive health and rights needs to go beyond individual behaviour change. </li></ul><ul><li>The HIV epidemic has forced greater acknowledgement of the fluidity and diversity of men’s sexual and social identities. </li></ul>
  4. 5. <ul><li>Within gender and development, the ‘men as the problem; women as victims’ discourse continues to hold sway – and to keep too many men away </li></ul><ul><li>The current discourse rests on essentialisms rarely brought into question </li></ul><ul><li>Work on men in development has failed to engage with core equity issues or to change the institutions that sustain inequitable gender orders </li></ul><ul><li>An issue like male violence is both a structural issue and personal one </li></ul>Why ‘politicising beyond the personal’?
  5. 6. Participants <ul><li>Academics (e.g. R Connell, A Cornwall, M Silberschmidt, R Morrell) </li></ul><ul><li>Programme implementers (from INGOs local NGOs and networks and alliances like “Men Engage” or “HIV/AIDS Alliance”) </li></ul><ul><li>Policy makers (UNFPA, UNAIDS, Swedish SIDA and NORAD) </li></ul>
  6. 7. Questions and reflections in Dakar <ul><li>Anxieties around the need to conform and perform around sex, pose risks to condom use & inhibit men from experiencing pleasure </li></ul><ul><li>To recognise these men is not to deny the harm that they can do to others, or indeed themselves </li></ul><ul><li>How can we break away from binary understandings of gender without losing sight of structural inequities? </li></ul><ul><li>We need to engage with poor men’s realities and vulnerabilities, without positing them as the new victims </li></ul><ul><li>“ Heteronormativity” – a more versatile and more nuanced principle (than “gender”), closer to the heart of the issues of power? </li></ul><ul><li> How can it be made more accessible/useful? </li></ul>
  7. 8. Some suggested strategies for action <ul><li>Re-orient and politicise existing work with men on gender from workshops and trainings to organising men for social change. </li></ul><ul><li>This would entail: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>consciousness-raising on structural issues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>mobilising men to campaign for changes in government policy, the legal justice system, corporate practice etc </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>training, including on partnership building and on how social movements function </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>capacity-building for men as activists </li></ul></ul>
  8. 9. Follow up activities <ul><li>Symposium Report </li></ul><ul><li>IDS ‘In Focus’ Policy Briefing: Men, Sex and HIV: Directions for Politicising Masculinities </li></ul><ul><li>Briefing Paper on Men, HIV, sexual health and rights </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(in co-operation with Realising Rights, by Oct) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Book “Politicising Masculinities: Beyond the Personal” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Planned by End of year 08 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Programme (2009 – 2010/11) on Dissident Masculinities – currently fundraising </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative activities w/ allies at events; </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mexico, AWID, CSW and Global Men Engage Symposium </li></ul></ul>
  9. 10. <ul><li>Thankyou! </li></ul>

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