Karen S. Wright
As you begin
your research,
ask yourself
the questions
of a
journalist:
Who? What?
When? Where?
Why? How?
Subject, Topic,
Question, Thesis=
Continuum:
Level 1: Broad subject
area
Level 2: Topic for
exploration
Level 3: Key quest...
1. Narrows your topic
to a single main
idea;
2. Asserts your
position in a clear
sentence;
Thesis

3. States not only a
fa...
4. Makes a
generalization that
can be supported by
facts, details, and
examples.

5. Curiosity in
readers prompts them
to ...
A good thesis statement will have one or more of the
following:
1. A strong, thoughtprovoking, or controversial
statement....
A good thesis statement will have one or more of the
following:
3. A question that will be answered in
detail in the essay...
•Once you have developed
your thesis statement,
write it on a Post-it
note or an index card
and keep it near you as
you wr...
The best introductions include an
anecdote, a short story--draw a picture of
your problem with words.
Look up key
words on your
topic in the
dictionary and
consider
connotations
and synonyms,
too.
Make your definition of the problem
more vivid with details about color,
light, location, movement, size,
smell, sound, ta...
Sometimes doing an interview or a
survey can produce good
definitions or even interesting
ideas for writing.
Convey information on what
causes or produces your topic
and what effects or results
emerge from it.
Example: What
causes ...
Help your reader understand your topic
by describing what it might be similar
to and different from.
What solutions have been tried?

What
has
worked?

What
has not
worked
Give your reader
information, facts, and
statistics on what
others say about your
topic.
Suggest possible solutions to the problem.
No
No research paper is complete without a call
to action.
•What now needs to be done?
•From where will the resources come?
Begin by defining the
problem
Write a thesis
statement to explain
the topic of your paper.
Write the
problem/analysis a...
Fairly present the
other side of the
argument.
Offer a rebuttal to the
opposite point-of-view.
Call to action—
encourag...
Writing extended definition paper2
Writing extended definition paper2
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Writing extended definition paper2

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Writing extended definition paper2

  1. 1. Karen S. Wright
  2. 2. As you begin your research, ask yourself the questions of a journalist: Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?
  3. 3. Subject, Topic, Question, Thesis= Continuum: Level 1: Broad subject area Level 2: Topic for exploration Level 3: Key question that concerns you Level 4:
  4. 4. 1. Narrows your topic to a single main idea; 2. Asserts your position in a clear sentence; Thesis 3. States not only a fact but also an
  5. 5. 4. Makes a generalization that can be supported by facts, details, and examples. 5. Curiosity in readers prompts them to think, “Why do Thesis
  6. 6. A good thesis statement will have one or more of the following: 1. A strong, thoughtprovoking, or controversial statement. (Bilingual education has not fulfilled its early promise.) 2. A call to action. (All innercity schools should set up bilingual programs.)
  7. 7. A good thesis statement will have one or more of the following: 3. A question that will be answered in detail in the essay. (What can bilingual education accomplish for a child? It can lead to academic and personal development.) 4. A preview or reflection (Bilingual education suffers from two main problems: a shortage of teachers and a lack of parental involvement.)
  8. 8. •Once you have developed your thesis statement, write it on a Post-it note or an index card and keep it near you as you write. •Your focus for your paper will be on this
  9. 9. The best introductions include an anecdote, a short story--draw a picture of your problem with words.
  10. 10. Look up key words on your topic in the dictionary and consider connotations and synonyms, too.
  11. 11. Make your definition of the problem more vivid with details about color, light, location, movement, size, smell, sound, taste.
  12. 12. Sometimes doing an interview or a survey can produce good definitions or even interesting ideas for writing.
  13. 13. Convey information on what causes or produces your topic and what effects or results emerge from it. Example: What causes poverty in America?
  14. 14. Help your reader understand your topic by describing what it might be similar to and different from.
  15. 15. What solutions have been tried? What has worked? What has not worked
  16. 16. Give your reader information, facts, and statistics on what others say about your topic.
  17. 17. Suggest possible solutions to the problem.
  18. 18. No
  19. 19. No research paper is complete without a call to action. •What now needs to be done? •From where will the resources come?
  20. 20. Begin by defining the problem Write a thesis statement to explain the topic of your paper. Write the problem/analysis and problem/solution.
  21. 21. Fairly present the other side of the argument. Offer a rebuttal to the opposite point-of-view. Call to action— encourage others to act on the possible solutions.

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