Conroe Day 2 Secondary

269 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
269
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Conroe Day 2 Secondary

  1. 1. Day 2 Secondary Emphasis
  2. 2. Reading Autobiographies Variations on a Theme
  3. 3.  http://whenintime.com/tl/karin/reading_autobiograph y/  http://whenintime.com/tl/Teri/Reading_Timeline/ When in Time
  4. 4.  Genre is a CATEGORY of literature:  Traditional literature  Historical fiction  Realistic fiction  Science fiction and fantasy  Nonfiction  FORM and FORMAT are the ways we can shape genre:  Picture books  Poetry  Graphic novels  Short stories  Novels  Plays Some Terms
  5. 5. Communities After Identity, comes Community
  6. 6.  Can be temporary or permanent  Can be specific in purpose or not  Can be FTF or online Communities
  7. 7. Building community
  8. 8. Communities via Social Networks Slideshare.net/
  9. 9.  Need daily affirmation and information  Reaches beyond own borders/walls  Exposure to many different ideas/viewpoints  Is open 24/7 Why community via SN?
  10. 10. So I turn to social media TWITTER
  11. 11. Who is on Twitter?
  12. 12.  Strongest growth in any social network surpassing Pinterest, Reddit, and LinkedIn  Used by 2 X as many women as men  25-55 year olds is largest demographic  “poor man’s social network”  60% of all users have some college education  Use has doubled in the past 12 months  MediaBistro, August 2012 Some Tweet Facts
  13. 13. Usage 2007-2012 http://www.ignitesocialmedia.com/social-media-stats/2012-social-network-analysis-report/
  14. 14. Here is what Twitter says about online PD/community All you need to do is ask…
  15. 15. Following @donalynbooks would net you hundreds of others to follow, connect you to #nerdybookclub and #titlechat and get links to @educationweek and other blogs
  16. 16. Connecting with @readingjunkee gets connections to @yalsa, nets more people to follow in the library field, and will also shake out book titles as must reads.
  17. 17. @utalaniz is the queen of RTs. If you miss something, she will catch it for you. Interesting links in her posts.
  18. 18.  Decreased funding for PD  Distance to events  Time away from work  Can meet like-minded individuals  Makes connections across country and world Why Twitter?
  19. 19. And here is @FrankiSibberson asking us what we are reading on Mondays. Another community!
  20. 20. And here is Sara’s tweet about Banned Books Week so we can see what her students do every day to celebrate the Freadom to Read.
  21. 21. Other communities  Librarians  Teachers  University folks  Organizations  Authors  Publishers Resources Available on Twitter
  22. 22. How and Where to Start
  23. 23. Assignment for my YA Literature Classes Follow  one literacy organization  one YA author  one teacher  one librarian  one professor My Approach
  24. 24.  @YALSA  @NCTE  @ALAOIF  @EDUCATIONWEEK  @KIDSNEEDTOREAD Literacy organization
  25. 25.  @libbabray  @flamelauthor  @Laurelsnyder  @studiojjk  @neilhimself Author
  26. 26.  @donalynbooks  @paulwhankins  @andersongl  @jenansbach  @heisereads  @franksibberson Teacher
  27. 27.  @frootjoos  @lbraun2000  @magpielibrarian  @scouri  @mrschureads  @lizb  @catagator  @sophieb Librarian
  28. 28.  @doctordea  @kperry  @dianeravitch  @professornana  @texaspageturner  @skajder Professor
  29. 29.  @lbschool  @harperteen  @randomhousekids  @scholastic  @candlewick Publishers
  30. 30. Name Twitter Handle Gretchen Colderup librarified Buffy Hamilton buffyjhamilton Jennifer Lagarde jenniferlagarde Karyn Silverman infowitch Jennifer Hubert-Swan readingrants Beth Saxton bethreads Sarah Couri scouri Erin Downey Howerton hybridlib Liz Burns lizb Melissa Rabey mrabey Kathy Ishikuza kishikuza Teri Lesesne professornana Sophie Brookover sophiebiblio Linda Braun lbraun2000 Joyce Valenza joycevalenza Monica Edinger medinger Angie Manfredi misskubelik Justin Hoenke justinlibrarian Patrick Ness Patrick_Ness YALSA yalsa Beth Friese librarybeth Neil Gaiman neilhimself Kirkus kirkusreviews ALAN ALANorg Pew Research pewresearch Kelly Milner Halls KellyMilnerH Anita Silvey anitasilvey School Library Journal sljournal jenbigheart Tammy Blackwell Miss_Tammy bkshelvesofdoom John Green realjohngreen Roger Sutton rogerreads The Horn Book hbook Betsy Bird fusenumber8 Diane Ravitch dianeravitch Brian Selznick brianselznick Books on Tape/Listening Library BOTLibrary Amy Alessio amyalessio Joanna Axelrod textinglibrarian catagator Twitter Starter Pack with Sophie Brookover
  31. 31.  Follow followers  Follow links  Follow suggestions Building out a PLN
  32. 32.  @Donalynbooks (9200+ followers)  @colbysharp (1000+ followers)  Augustascattergood  @paulwhankins (almost 4000 followers)  @katsok So, if I follow Donalyn and Paul and Colby, I have the potential for reaching 15K people with my tweets. Following followers
  33. 33. Not just people, links
  34. 34. Links
  35. 35. Links
  36. 36. Joining Tweet Chats Making more connections
  37. 37.  Last Sunday of every month  7-8 PM CST  Hosted by @donalynbooks and @colbysharp  Topic announced in advance  Open to all  Chat is always archived Titletalk
  38. 38.  Thursdays from 7-8 PM CST  Hosted by @lizb and @catagator and @sophiebib  Various aspects of readers’ advisory is theme  Chat is archived Readadv
  39. 39.  Engchat  Mondays  Satchat  Saturdays  4thchat, 5thchat  Grade level chats  Sschat  Social studies community Other chats
  40. 40.  Link accounts as much as you can  Download apps such as Tweetdeck or Hootsuite to help handle the reading load and postings  You can also use sites like TweetGrid or Twubs to help you manage chats.  Set aside regular time to read and respond to tweets  Be careful of the time suck element Some final advice
  41. 41. FTF Communities In the classroom, school
  42. 42. Work Colleagues
  43. 43. Book Clubs
  44. 44. Genres in YA Literature
  45. 45. Realistic Fiction Exploring the “real” world through literature
  46. 46. http://www.education.com/reference/art icle/characteristics-good-realistic-fiction/ Some Resources
  47. 47.  Does the plot ask children young adults to consider their own situation and inspire without providing “handy resolutions” (Aronson, 2001, p. 119), and not talk down to readers or tell them what to think?  Is there an accurate reflection of the human condition and contemporary life without stereotyping?  Are there engaging and true-to-life, well-rounded characters? Questions to Consider
  48. 48. Time to Talk How do the books you read for today address the criteria for realistic fiction?
  49. 49. Historical Fiction Any story set in the past
  50. 50.  Huck, Charlotte. Children’s Literature in the Elementary School. 7th ed. McGraw-Hill, 2001.  Latrobe, Kathy H., Carolyn S. Brodie, and Maureen White. The Children’s Literature Dictionary. New York: Neal Schuman, 2002.  Norton, Donna E. and Saundra E. Norton. Through the Eyes of a Child: An Introduction to Children’s Literature. 6th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall, 2003. Resources
  51. 51.  Do the character’ experiences, conflicts, and resolutions of conflicts reflect what is known about the time period?  Do the characters’ actions express values and beliefs that are realistic for the time period?  Is the language authentic for the period without relying on so many colorful terms or dialects that the story is difficult to understand?  Is the setting authentic in every detail? Evaluative Criteria
  52. 52.  Are details integrated into the story so that they do not overwhelm readers or detract from the story?  If the setting is the antagonist, are the relationships between characters and settng clearly developed?  Is the theme worthwhile?  Doe the style enhance the mood and clarify the conflicts, characterizations, settings, and themes? More criteria
  53. 53. Time to Talk How do the books you read for today address the criteria for historical fiction?

×