Conroe Day 1 Presentation

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Conroe Day 1 Presentation

  1. 1. Literature for Children, Tweens, & Teens
  2. 2. Teri Lesesne (rhymes with insane) • @professornana • Ls5385blog.blogspot.com • Professornana.livejournal.com • doctorL@shsu.edu
  3. 3. Karin Perry • @kperry • http://www.karinsbooknook.com • http://karinlibrarian.tumblr.com • kperry@shsu.edu
  4. 4. Our Reading Lives
  5. 5. Teri’s Childhood
  6. 6. Karin: the early years Lassie – Little Golden Books Disney Book-of-the-Month Club
  7. 7. Terrible Tween Teri
  8. 8. Karin In-between
  9. 9. Book Orders
  10. 10. Where’s the YA? Teri’s Teens
  11. 11. The YA-YA Years: Karin
  12. 12. Teri’s Split Personality
  13. 13. A Bit Disturbed?: Karin
  14. 14. Your reading autobiography • So, what are the highlights of your reading life? • What are the low points? • Titles, series, authors, books you recall strongly?
  15. 15. Take a few minutes now to jot down some memories of reading from your childhood, school years, adult life. We are asking each of you to design your own reading autobiography. You may write it as an essay, present it in slides, or make timelines. Use Prezi, Power Point, Padlet, or any app you like. Or use a pen and paper or computer. Be prepared to share this week.
  16. 16. Reader’s Identity: What kind of reader are you? Are You? • Avid • Every day • Wide-ranging • Open to new forms, formats, etc. • Social Or Are You? • Need some prodding • Sporadically • Stick to what I like • Narrow focus for reading • Solitary
  17. 17. Part of Teri’s reading family
  18. 18. Teaching By Example
  19. 19. Karin’s Reading Family
  20. 20. Our Plan for Today • Why do we share literature with kids? • How do we establish a reading identity? • What tools do we ALL need? • Time • Booktalking • Reading aloud • Community • Access
  21. 21. Top Reasons We Share Literature
  22. 22. #1 It is FUN!
  23. 23. #2 It aids in the acquisition of language and language development.
  24. 24. #3 It develops empathy.
  25. 25. #4 It transmits cultures.
  26. 26. #5 It aids in the development of lifelong readers: Unconscious Delight
  27. 27. #6 It aids in the development of lifelong readers: Reading Autobiographically
  28. 28. #7 It aids in the development of lifelong readers: Reading Vicariously
  29. 29. #8 It aids in the development of lifelong readers: Reading for Philosophical Speculation
  30. 30. #9 It aids in the development of lifelong readers: Reading Aesthetically
  31. 31. #10 It can help us teach content.
  32. 32. Identity
  33. 33. Educators as Models Turn to your shoulder partner and brainstorm ways we can demonstrate our love of reading.
  34. 34. Informal Displays
  35. 35. Book Walls/Doors Jillian Heise Sarah Anderson http://www.heisereads.com/ http://yaloveblog.com/
  36. 36. Literacy Lockers http://yaloveblog.com/2013/03/24/literacy-lockers/
  37. 37. Bulletin Board Displays
  38. 38. Displays with Tech
  39. 39. If You Like….Display
  40. 40. Banned Books Display http://thebrownbagteacher.blogspot.com/2013/09/celebrating-banned-books.html
  41. 41. Abandoned Books Display
  42. 42. New Book Display
  43. 43. Elementary Classroom Libraries
  44. 44. Middle School Classroom Libraries
  45. 45. High School Classroom Libraries http://yaloveblog.com/2012/05/29/creating-and-managing-a-classroom-library/
  46. 46. What Does TBR Mean?
  47. 47. TBR Stacks
  48. 48. Making Adjustments • Finding the Time • Mind the Gap • Crossing bridges • Challenging comfort zones 48
  49. 49. Time
  50. 50. Finding the Time • Edge time (Donalyn Miller) • Priority time • Class time 50
  51. 51. Edge Time • Reading on the fringes – Appointments – Bathroom books – Car – Purse or bookbag 51
  52. 52. Priority Time • If it is not a priority for us, how can we expect it to be a priority for them? • Take a moment to jot down one time you will set aside daily (just 5 minutes) to read. • Make this commitment real by adding it to your calendar. 52
  53. 53. Have a Plan
  54. 54. Class Time 54
  55. 55. Finding Time to Read • Average person can read 300 words per minute • In one week, that is 31,500 words • In one year, it is 1,512,000 words • Average book is 75,000 words • Can read +20 books a year with only 15 minutes a day • More than 1000 extra books in a lifetime 55
  56. 56. 56
  57. 57. 57
  58. 58. Mind the Gap • What HOLES are in your reading range? • What will you do to address them? • How can you help kids do the same? • Identify ONE genre, form, format you will read in the next 60 days. 58
  59. 59. Some resources • Titletalk – Last Sunday of the month from 7-8 pm Central Time – Hosted by @donalynbooks and @colbysharp – Talk is archived as well • Centurions of 2013 – Resolved to read 113 books in 2013 • Nerdbery Challenge • Group Challenge 59
  60. 60. WHAT will be YOUR challenge? • August • September • October • November • December • January • February • March • April • May
  61. 61. Reading outside of comfort zones • It is important to read a wide variety of literature in order to recommend books to all your readers. • Check your favorite authors to see if they’ve written other genres. ex. Margaret Peterson Haddix, Avi, Richard Peck, etc. • Set a goal. Read one new genre for five of your usual books. • Take reading suggestions from your students. Make a point to go talk to them after you’ve finished their recommendation.
  62. 62. Some Tips • Picture books • Graphic novels • Quick reads • Poem or story a day 62
  63. 63. So, what is YOUR plan? Take a few minutes to outline what YOU will do this coming school year to read MORE. Be specific about goals.
  64. 64. Reading aloud
  65. 65. LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD AND THE WOLF
  66. 66. Here is one version
  67. 67. Ladder for LRRH
  68. 68. Climbing the Ladder
  69. 69. A Spanish Flair
  70. 70. Multicultural Perspectives
  71. 71. YA Interpretation
  72. 72. Follow-up Activity
  73. 73. What have we learned?
  74. 74. Great Resource • http://www.acpl.lib.in.us/children/redriding hood.html • http://www.usm.edu/media/english/fairytal es/lrrh/lrrhhome.htm
  75. 75. Memories of read alouds? Share with others Report out
  76. 76. The Why • What research says – Alicia Martinez – Stephen Krashen – Jim Trelease & More – Becoming a Nation of Readers • What we know from our own research – Pleasure – Prosody – Performance
  77. 77. Alicia Martinez • Meta-analysis of all read aloud studies up to 1985 – No matter age/grade, reading aloud improved: • Vocabulary • Reading comprehension • Grammatical understanding (sentence structures, etc.)
  78. 78. Stephen Krashen • When teachers read aloud and discuss stories with students, students read more • Students who are read aloud to check out more library books • Hearing stories and discussing them encourages independent reading • Hearing stories has a direct impact on vocabulary development • Children who are read to at least three times a week read better • Students enjoy being read to
  79. 79. Jim Trelease • The Read Aloud Handbook • First 150 pp. online here: http://tinyurl.com/k9j3uzv
  80. 80. More research • http://tinyurl.com/kb8sw5qBill Teale • Article: Reading Aloud in Classrooms: From the Modal Toward a "Model” by James Hoffman, Nancy L. Roser & Jennifer Battle. Reading Teacher (1993) Vol. 46 (6): pp. 496- 507
  81. 81. http://www2.readaloud.org/importance?gcli d=CLem3Nvi-70CFQQT7Aodk34AcQ
  82. 82. http://www2.readaloud.org/importance?gclid= CLem3Nvi-70CFQQT7Aodk34AcQ
  83. 83. Becoming a Nation of Readers (1985) • Skilled reading requires motivation • Skilled reading is a lifelong pursuit • Skilled reading requires activating background knowledge • “The single most important activity for building knowledge required for success in reading is reading aloud to children. “ p. 23
  84. 84. Serafini and Giorgis • Reading aloud increases test scores • Introduces readers to new titles, authors, genres, etc. • Builds a sense of community • Provides opportunities for extended discussions • Demonstrates response strategies • Increases interest in independent reading • Gives access to text that might be inaccessible • Provides models of quality writing • Supports readers’ development
  85. 85. PLEASURE • SCIENTIFIC READING FACT: Human beings are pleasure-centered. Every time you read to a child, you’re sending a “pleasure” message to the child’s brain, conditioning it to associate books and print with pleasure. Jim Trelease http://www.trelease-on- reading.com/read-aloud-brochure.pdf
  86. 86. PERFORMANCE • Four P’s – Prepare – Project – Place – Perform
  87. 87. BEGIN A SHORT LESSON AKA Teachable Moments
  88. 88. Celebrating Cultures • create multi-paragraph essays to convey information about a topic that: • (i) present effective introductions and concluding paragraphs; • (ii) guide and inform the reader's understanding of key ideas and evidence; • (iii) include specific facts, details, and examples in an appropriately organized structure; and • (iv) use a variety of sentence structures and transitions to link paragraphs; 89
  89. 89. TEKS for ELAR • Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. • Students are expected to explain how authors create meaning through stylistic elements and figurative language emphasizing the use of personification, hyperbole, and refrains. 90
  90. 90. TEKS for NF • (A) summarize the main ideas and supporting details in text, demonstrating an understanding that a summary does not include opinions; • (B) explain whether facts included in an argument are used for or against an issue; • (C) explain how different organizational patterns (e.g., proposition-and-support, problem- and-solution) develop the main idea and the author's viewpoint; and • (D) synthesize and make logical connections between ideas within a text and across two or three texts representing similar or different genres. 91
  91. 91. Informational Poetry • How could this collection of poems be used in a lesson on informational text? • How could it be used as a Mentor Text? • What other use might it have? 92
  92. 92. Compare and Contrast 93
  93. 93. Symbolism 94
  94. 94. Crowdsourced Read Aloud Titles http://professornana.livejournal. com
  95. 95. Selections from the list • ALABAMA MOON • ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY • ALEXANDER WHO USED TO BE RICH LAST SUNDAY • AM I BLUE • AMONG THE HIDDEN • ANASI AND THE TALKING MELON • ANTSY DOES TIME • BABY
  96. 96. • BECAUSE OF WINN DIXIE • BEE TREE • BIGGER THAN A BREADBOX • BINK AND GOLLIE • BOY + BOT • BOY IN THE STRIPED PAJAMAS • BRIDGE TO TERABITHIA • BUD NOT BUDDY
  97. 97. • CRANKEE DOODLE • CRANKENSTEIN • CREEPY CARROTS • CROOKED KIND OF PERFECT • DAY THE CRAYONS QUIT • DEAR MR. MUTT • DECEMBER • DO NOT READ THIS BOOK • DOGZILLA
  98. 98. • HARRIS AND ME • HARRY POTTER • HERSHEL AND THE HANNUKAH GOBLINS • HOBBIT • HOUSE HELD UP BY TREES • HOW ANGEL PETERSON GOT HIS NAME • HUSH • I STINK • I WANT MY HAT BACK
  99. 99. • LAWN BOY • LEONARD THE TERRIBLE MONSTER • LIBERATION OF GABRIEL KING • LIBRARIAN WHO MEASURED THE EARTH • LIBRARY MOUSE • LIGHTNING THIEF • LILY’S PURPLE PLASTIC PURSE
  100. 100. • MIRACLE’S BOYS • MIRACULOUS JOURNEY OF EDWARD TULANE • MISFITS • MISS RUMPHIUS • MONSTER • MR. LEMONCELLO’S LIBRARY • MR. WUFFLES • NEVER TRUST A MOTHER OR THE BABYSITTER • NIGHTJOHN • NINO WRESTLES THE WORLD • OF MICE AND MEN • OFFICER BUCKLE AND GLORIa
  101. 101. • OWL MOON • PETER’S CHAIR • PIGGIE PIE • PINK AND SAY • PIGGIE AND GERALD • PRESS HERE • RIFLE • ROLL OF THUNDER HEAR MY CRY • RUBY HOLLER
  102. 102. • SPEAK • STAND TALL • STARGIRL • STARRY RIVER OF THE SKY • STORY OF FISH AND SNAIL • STRANGER • SWAMP ANGEL • SYLVESTER AND THE MAGIC PEBBLE • TALE DARK AND GRIMM • TALE OF DESPERAUX • TALKING EGGS • TANGLE OF KNOTS
  103. 103. BOOKTALKING
  104. 104. Building community
  105. 105. Communities • Can be temporary or permanent • Can be specific in purpose or not • Can be FTF or online
  106. 106. Communities via Social Networks Slideshare.net/
  107. 107. Why community via SN? • Need daily affirmation and information • Reaches beyond own borders/walls • Exposure to many different ideas/viewpoints • Is open 24/7
  108. 108. SO I TURN TO SOCIAL MEDIA TWITTER
  109. 109. Who is on Twitter?
  110. 110. Some Tweet Facts • Strongest growth in any social network surpassing Pinterest, Reddit, and LinkedIn • Used by 2 X as many women as men • 25-55 year olds is largest demographic • “poor man’s social network” • 60% of all users have some college education • Use has doubled in the past 12 months • MediaBistro, August 2012
  111. 111. Usage 2007-2012 http://www.ignitesocialmedia.com/social-media-stats/2012-social-network-analysis-report/
  112. 112. HERE IS WHAT TWITTER SAYS ABOUT ONLINE PD/COMMUNITY All you need to do is ask…
  113. 113. Following @donalynbooks would net you hundreds of others to follow, connect you to #nerdybookclub and #titlechat and get links to @educationweek and other blogs
  114. 114. Connecting with @readingjunkee gets connections to @yalsa, nets more people to follow in the library field, and will also shake out book titles as must reads.
  115. 115. @utalaniz is the queen of RTs. If you miss something, she will catch it for you. Interesting links in her posts.
  116. 116. Why Twitter? • Decreased funding for PD • Distance to events • Time away from work • Can meet like-minded individuals • Makes connections across country and world
  117. 117. And here is @FrankiSibberson asking us what we are reading on Mondays. Another community!
  118. 118. And here is Sara’s tweet about Banned Books Week so we can see what her students do every day to celebrate the Freadom to Read.
  119. 119. Resources Available on Twitter Other communities – Librarians – Teachers – University folks – Organizations – Authors – Publishers
  120. 120. How and Where to Start
  121. 121. My Approach Assignment for my YA Literature Classes Follow – one literacy organization – one YA author – one teacher – one librarian – one professor
  122. 122. Literacy organization • @YALSA • @NCTE • @ALAOIF • @EDUCATIONWEEK • @KIDSNEEDTOREAD
  123. 123. Author • @libbabray • @flamelauthor • @Laurelsnyder • @studiojjk • @neilhimself
  124. 124. Teacher • @donalynbooks • @paulwhankins • @andersongl • @jenansbach • @heisereads • @franksibberson
  125. 125. Librarian • @frootjoos • @lbraun2000 • @magpielibrarian • @scouri • @mrschureads • @lizb • @catagator • @sophieb
  126. 126. Professor • @doctordea • @kperry • @dianeravitch • @professornana • @texaspageturner • @skajder
  127. 127. Publishers • @lbschool • @harperteen • @randomhousekids • @scholastic • @candlewick
  128. 128. Twitter Starter Pack with Sophie Brookover Name Twitter Handle Gretchen Colderup librarified Buffy Hamilton buffyjhamilton Jennifer Lagarde jenniferlagarde Karyn Silverman infowitch Jennifer Hubert-Swan readingrants Beth Saxton bethreads Sarah Couri scouri Erin Downey Howerton hybridlib Liz Burns lizb Melissa Rabey mrabey Kathy Ishikuza kishikuza Teri Lesesne professornana Sophie Brookover sophiebiblio Linda Braun lbraun2000 Joyce Valenza joycevalenza Monica Edinger medinger Angie Manfredi misskubelik Justin Hoenke justinlibrarian Patrick Ness Patrick_Ness YALSA yalsa Beth Friese librarybeth Neil Gaiman neilhimself Kirkus kirkusreviews ALAN ALANorg Pew Research pewresearch Kelly Milner Halls KellyMilnerH Anita Silvey anitasilvey School Library Journal sljournal jenbigheart Tammy Blackwell Miss_Tammy bkshelvesofdoom John Green realjohngreen Roger Sutton rogerreads The Horn Book hbook Betsy Bird fusenumber8 Diane Ravitch dianeravitch Brian Selznick brianselznick Books on Tape/ListeningLibrary BOTLibrary Amy Alessio amyalessio Joanna Axelrod textinglibrarian catagator
  129. 129. Building out a PLN • Follow followers • Follow links • Follow suggestions
  130. 130. Following followers • @Donalynbooks (9200+ followers) – @colbysharp (1000+ followers) • Augustascattergood – @paulwhankins (almost 4000 followers) • @katsok So, if I follow Donalyn and Paul and Colby, I have the potential for reaching 15K people with my tweets.
  131. 131. Not just people, links
  132. 132. Links
  133. 133. Links
  134. 134. JOINING TWEET CHATS Making more connections
  135. 135. Titletalk • Last Sunday of every month • 7-8 PM CST • Hosted by @donalynbooks and @colbysharp • Topic announced in advance • Open to all • Chat is always archived
  136. 136. Readadv • Thursdays from 7-8 PM CST • Hosted by @lizb and @catagator and @sophiebib • Various aspects of readers’ advisory is theme • Chat is archived
  137. 137. Other chats • Engchat – Mondays • Satchat – Saturdays • 4thchat, 5thchat – Grade level chats • Sschat – Social studies community
  138. 138. Some final advice • Link accounts as much as you can • Download apps such as Tweetdeck or Hootsuite to help handle the reading load and postings • You can also use sites like TweetGrid or Twubs to help you manage chats. • Set aside regular time to read and respond to tweets • Be careful of the time suck element
  139. 139. FTF Communities In the classroom, school
  140. 140. Work Colleagues
  141. 141. Book Clubs

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