Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Know thyself: Understanding and managing biases

Know thyself: Understanding and managing biases

Download to read offline

Despite best intentions, all of us have biases. It’s more important than ever to understand our biases to achieve the good we want in the world and avoid pitfalls. We explore ways to discover and discuss biases constructively before they undermine work and consider pragmatic approaches to manage their influence in our projects.

Despite best intentions, all of us have biases. It’s more important than ever to understand our biases to achieve the good we want in the world and avoid pitfalls. We explore ways to discover and discuss biases constructively before they undermine work and consider pragmatic approaches to manage their influence in our projects.

More Related Content

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Know thyself: Understanding and managing biases

  1. 1. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 1 Know thyself: Understanding and managing biases Karen Bachmann karen@designforcontext.com @karenbachmann BarCamp Tampa Bay #BCTPA
  2. 2. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 ● How to have non-threatening and productive discussions ● Tools for identifying our biases ● Tools to manage biases ● Bringing our new awareness into our design practice What we will discuss 2
  3. 3. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 3 No longer a mystery “why” it matters
  4. 4. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 Awareness, ourselves and our colleagues Exposure to other perspectives Connection with our own humanity What do we need most
  5. 5. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 When you know better, you do better. - Betty Easterly
  6. 6. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 6 An approachable definition of bias ● How should we talk about biases to ensure a non- threatening and productive discussion? A LITTLE BACKGROUND
  7. 7. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 Bias: A Mental Shortcut 7 ● Part of being human ● Kahneman’s System 1 ● Not inherently bad, may be misapplied ● Implicit = invisible ● Not necessarily in sync with our conscious beliefs ● Can be managed and changed
  8. 8. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 SO MANY BIASES! 8
  9. 9. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 Do you see what I see? 9 How do you describe this … without any presuppositions? Objectivity is more elusive than we want – or like – to admit to ourselves. Image: https://www.flickr.com/photos/horiavarlan/4273846588/
  10. 10. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 Addressing bias challenges many fields 10 Healthcare Business GovernmentLaw enforcement Safety Data science Technology Journalism Entertainment UX Research & Design Science [Insert your field here]
  11. 11. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 11 Building awareness and knowing ourselves ● How can we best identify the biases within ourselves and our teams? ● What tools and processes to control for bias we can introduce into our processes? ● Where do biases emerge in our work? KNOWING OURSELVES
  12. 12. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 Start with understanding your own bias Don’t fall into the illusion of complete objectivity Don’t be afraid to acknowledge bias Know thyself
  13. 13. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 ● Provide the tools for mindfulness and self-awareness as well as building team awareness ● Acknowledge your own biases and be open to learning more ● Establish clear goals to understand biases and why it matters to the team and to your work ● Establish communication ground rules ● Use the ability to see the biases of others with empathy and compassion Discussions with the team 13
  14. 14. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 12 steps from #uxchat ●Encourage diversity ●Step back from your ego ●Always be talking to others ●Self-examination ●Beware of “groupthink” ●Uncover biases as early as possible ●Bring in a moderator ●Be transparent ●Be inclusive ●Focus on the data ●Encourage safe spaces and secure channels ●Have empathy, always 14 http://whatusersdo.com/blog/how-to-fight-bias-in-your-organisation-or-team/ (now part of UserZoom)
  15. 15. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 Detection Tools ●Changing decision making approach ● Pre-mortems ● Worst case scenario ● Multiple estimations -> designs ● Seek outside view ●Implicit Association Test ●Flip it to test it ●Invite examination and input from people who are not like “us” ●Appoint a Devil’s Diversity Advocate ●Slow down and reflect 15
  16. 16. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 16 MY IAT results on disability
  17. 17. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 ● What's your default mode for judgments and decisions? ●A bat and a ball cost $1.10 in total. The bat costs $1.00 more than the ball. How much does the ball cost? ●If it takes five machines five minutes to make five widgets, how many minutes would it take 100 machines to make 100 widgets? ●In a lake, there is a patch of lily pads. Every day, the patch doubles in size. If it takes 48 days for the patch to cover the entire lake, how many days would it take for the patch to cover half the lake? Cognitive-reflection test created by Shane Frederick at Yale and originally appeared in The Journal of Economic Perspectives. https://hbr.org/2015/04/test-yourself-are-you-being-tricked-by-intuition Are you being tricked by intuition? 17
  18. 18. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 WHICH BIASES SHOULD WE LOOK FOR FIRST? 18 Confirmation bias Anchoring Implicit bias Ingroup/Outgroup Pro-Innovation Recency effect Overconfidence Backfire effect
  19. 19. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 19 BIASES AFFECT EVERY ASPECT OF OUR WORK Have I considered other perspectives in defining a problem? Am I asking the right questions? Am I encouraging and being informed by other points of view? Do I understand the answers without filtering? Am I open to new information? Have I oversimplified the problem or the context? Am I reacting or deciding? Have I considered different options reasonably?
  20. 20. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 20 Controlling our biases in our work ● How do we monitor for regressing thinking and new biases throughout the design process? MINDFULNESS & MANAGEMENT
  21. 21. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 Mindfulness is a journey, not a destination
  22. 22. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 ● Make the detection tools part of the design process – not once and done ● Define goals and checks around identified biases ● Set objectives, check objectives ● Trip wires ● Watch for emergent “excuses” for regressing to System 1 thinking Fostering continual awareness 22
  23. 23. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 ● Establish a culture of questioning ● Listen for discord and regression ● Bias buddies ● Use technological aids where possible ● Communicate shared understanding continuously ● Be kind to each other Enabling communication 23
  24. 24. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 Awareness, ourselves and our colleagues Exposure to other perspectives Connection with our own humanity What do we need most
  25. 25. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 Cited resources These resources were directly incorporated in the presentation. ● B. Benson. “Cognitive bias cheat sheet.” (2016): https://betterhumans.coach.me/cognitive-bias-cheat-sheet-55a472476b18 ● J. Beshears, S. Frederick, and F. Gino “Test Yourself: Are You Being Tricked by Intuition?” Harvard Business Review. (2015): https://hbr.org/2015/04/test-yourself-are-you-being-tricked-by-intuition ● T. Bradberry. “13 Cognitive Biases That Really Screw Things Up For You.” (2018): https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/13-cognitive-biases- really-screw-things-up-you-dr-travis-bradberry/ ● M. Funchess. “Implicit Bias -- how it effects us and how we push through.” TEDxFlourCity. (2014): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr8G7MtRNlk ● E. Hall. “The 9 Rules of Design Research.” (2018): https://medium.com/mule-design/the-9-rules-of-design-research-1a273fdd1d3b ● H.G. Halvorson. “How To Recognize (And Overcome) Your Unconscious Biases In Hiring.” Fast Company. (2015): https://www.fastcompany.com/3043074/how-to-thwart-your-unconscious-biases-when-hiring-a-diverse-team ● S. Judd. “Superfan.” (2018): http://www.sachajudd.com/superfan ● D. Kahneman. Thinking, Fast and Slow. (2011) ● T. Keereepart. “3 design principles to help us overcome everyday bias.” TEDxPortland. (2016): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6dstCUWsFY ● S. Lawrence-Lightfoot and J. Hoffmann Davis. The Art and Science of Portraiture. (1997): http://www.saralawrencelightfoot.com/portraiture1.html ● A.C. Madrigal. “Disposable America.” The Atlantic. (2018): https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/06/disposable- america/563204/ 25
  26. 26. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 Cited resources (cont’d) ● P. McIntosh. "White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack" Peace and Freedom Magazine. (1989): https://nationalseedproject.org/white-privilege-unpacking-the-invisible-knapsack ● K. Pressner. ”Are you biased? I am.” TEDxBasel. (2016): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bq_xYSOZrgU ● Project Implicit. (2011): https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/index.jsp ● C. Ratcliff. “12 ways to fight bias in your team” Synopsys of #uxchat on Twitter, hosted by K. Bachmann. (2018): http://whatusersdo.com/blog/how-to-fight-bias-in-your-organisation-or-team/ ● S.E. Smith. “Why philosophy is so important in science education.” Quartz. (2017): https://qz.com/1132948/why-philosophy-is-so- important-in-science-education/ (Inspiration for the “Do you see” exercise on Slide 9) ● J.B. Soll, K.L. Milkman, and J.W. Payne. “Outsmart your own biases.” Harvard Business Review. (2015): https://hbr.org/2015/05/outsmart-your-own-biases ● S. Watcher-Boettcher. Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic Tech. (2017): http://www.sarawb.com/technically-wrong/ 26
  27. 27. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 These resources were not quoted or directly use for my presentation, but present ideas and examples that influenced my thinking and offer valuable, interesting insights. ● American Alliance of Museums. “Unconscious Bias and Personal Work.” (2018): https://www.aam-us.org/programs/diversity-equity- accessibility-and-inclusion/facing-change-unconscious-bias-and-personal-work/ ● @BienSur_JeTaime. “One of the reasons for more ethnic diversity in tech. Devices can't be biased, but if the creators don't account for their own biases it shows up in things like Asian women being indistinguishable to iPhones and black hands not triggering sensors in soap machines.” (2017): https://twitter.com/BienSur_JeTaime/status/941866665746235397 ● S. Bradley. “All the creepy, crazy and amazing things that happened in AI in 2017.” Wired. (2017): http://www.wired.co.uk/article/what-happened-in-ai-in-2017 ● G.L. Ciampaglia and F. Menczer. “Misinformation and biases infect social media, both intentionally and accidentally.” The Conversation. (2018): http://theconversation.com/misinformation-and-biases-infect-social-media-both-intentionally-and-accidentally- 97148 ● J. Clark. “Design in the Era of the Algorithm.” Presentation at Mind the Product, synopsis by J. Gadsby Peet. (2017): https://www.mindtheproduct.com/2017/11/product-design-era-algorithm-josh-clark/ ● D. Chopra. “Does the Human Mind Need a Fresh Start?” (2017): https://www.choprafoundation.org/science-consciousness/does-the- human-mind-need-a-fresh-start/ ● R. Courtland. “Bias detectives: the researchers striving to make algorithms fair.” Nature. (2018): https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05469-3 ● D. Gray. Liminal Thinking: Create the change you want by changing the way you think. (2016): http://liminalthinking.com/ Additional resources 27
  28. 28. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 ● M. Hartmann. “Unpacking the biases that shape our beliefs.” TEDxStJohns. (2015): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dU7Mhne4CzU ● N.A. Heflick. “We Are Blind to Our Own Biases.” Psychology Today. (2011): https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-big- questions/201102/we-are-blind-our-own-biases ● D. Hernandez. “Unpacking and Transforming Your Biases For A Better Community.” TEDxSanAntonio. (2016): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FU4CDFFy77g ● D. Hockett. “We all have implicit biases. So what can we do about it?” TEDxMidAtlanticSalon. (2017): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKHSJHkPeLY ● C. Jager. “24 Cognitive Biases You Need To Stop Making [Infographic]” Lifehacker. (2018): https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2018/03/find-out-which-cognitive-biases-alter-your-perspective/ ● T. Laurinavicius. “Cognitive Biases You Need to Master to Design Better Websites.” (2018): https://webdesign.tutsplus.com/articles/cognitive-biases-you-need-to-master-to-design-better-websites--cms-30742 ● J. Lindzon. “This Brain Hack Will Help Reframe Your Interpretation Of Reality.” Fast Company. (2017): https://www.fastcompany.com/40500514/this-brain-hack-will-help-reframe-your-interpretation-of-reality ● E. Livni. “The philosophy that could have stopped Silicon Valley’s crisis of conscience before it started.” Quartz. (2017): https://qz.com/1161704/silicon-valley-elite-from-companies-like-facebook-and-google-are-soothing-their-consciences-at-californias- esalen-institute/ ● Microsoft. “Keeping an Eye on AI with Dr. Kate Crawford.” Microsoft Research Podcast. (2018): https://www.microsoft.com/en- us/research/blog/keeping-an-eye-on-ai-with-dr-kate-crawford/?OCID=msr_podcast_kcrawford_tw Additional resources (cont’d) 28
  29. 29. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 ● Mind Tools. “Avoiding Psychological Bias in Decision Making: How to Make Objective Decisions.” (2018): https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/avoiding-psychological-bias.htm ● Partnership on AI. (2016-1018): https://www.partnershiponai.org/ ● J. Powell. “It's About Time We Challenge Our Unconscious Biases.” TEDxStLouisWomen. (2016): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thkmVv54e6M ● J. Powles. “New York City’s Bold, Flawed Attempt to Make Algorithms Accountable.” The New Yorker. (2017): https://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/new-york-citys-bold-flawed-attempt-to-make-algorithms-accountable ● M.J. Socolow. “How to Prevent Smart People From Spreading Dumb Ideas.” The New York Times. (2018): https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/22/opinion/facebook-spreading-ideas.html ● J. Temperton. “DeepMind's new AI ethics unit is the company's next big move.” Wired UK. (2017): http://www.wired.co.uk/article/deepmind-ethics-and-society-artificial-intelligence ● A. Thompson. “Google’s Sentiment Analyzer Thinks Being Gay Is Bad.” Motherboard. (2017): https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/j5jmj8/google-artificial-intelligence-bias ● @sara_ann_marie. “the line from "look at our cool new facial-recognition app" to "wow this thing only works for white people" is a fucking millimeter long and clearly marked. why can't a single tech co seem to be able to see it?” (2018): https://twitter.com/sara_ann_marie/status/953783812315602944 ● M. Simmons. “Studies Show That People Who Have High ‘Integrative Complexity’ Are More Likely To Be Successful.” (2018): https://medium.com/the-mission/studies-show-that-people-who-have-high-integrative-complexity-are-more-likely-to-be-successful- 443480e8930c Additional resources (cont’d) 29
  30. 30. @karenbachmann Know Thyself: Managing Bias #UXPA2018 Know thyself Understanding and managing biases BarCamp Tampa Bay • November 2018 slides posted at: www.designforcontext.com/insights www.slideshare.net/karenbachmann Karen Bachmann karen@designforcontext.com @karenbachmann BarCamp Tampa Bay #BCTPA

Editor's Notes

  • Listening talk: filters and barriers
    NASA project – beliefs as a key element of project success, morphed into biases

    “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”
    ― Jonathan Swift
    “It's not at all hard to understand a person; it's only hard to listen without bias.”
    ― Criss Jami, Killosophy
    “The eye sees only what the mind is prepared to comprehend.”
    ― Robertson Davies, Tempest-Tost
    “I have yet to see a piece of writing, political or non-political, that does not have a slant. All writing slants the way a writer leans, and no man is born perpendicular.”
    ― E.B. White

  • How should we talk about biases to ensure a non-threatening and productive discussion?
    How can we best identify the biases within our teams, including ourselves?
    What tools and processes to control for bias we can introduce into our processes?
    Where do biases emerge in our work?
    How can we best incorporate our understanding within our design and research process?
    How do we monitor for regressing thinking and new biases throughout the design process?
  • Algorithms and training data
    Data collection
    Data use
    Limited perspectives informing the choices we make
    Echo chambers and social bubbles

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/07/the-internet-is-one-big-personality-test/531861/
    When algorithms can be trained to accurately infer your personality based on anything you do, the internet is a personality quiz—or, at least, it can be, so long as each page visit, web search, and “like” can be gathered and correlated. Online, before you even click on a quiz, you’re already filling something out.
    “We’re being trained by algorithms that they’re always right,” Kosinski says. … If people’s faith in algorithms continues to grow, it might not be long before I trust a computer to tell me about my personality more than I trust friends or family—or more than I trust myself.

    http://www.wired.co.uk/article/mustafa-suleyman-deepmind-ai-morals-ethics
    [AI technologies] could shine a light on damaging human biases and help society address them, or entrench patterns of discrimination and perpetuate them.
    We need to do the hard, practical and messy work of finding out what ethical AI really means.

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/tedchiang/the-real-danger-to-civilization-isnt-ai-its-runaway
    Silicon Valley has unconsciously created a devil in their own image, a boogeyman whose excesses are precisely their own. [AI isn’t the problem. It’s exposing the underlying problem.]

    https://www.mindtheproduct.com/2017/11/product-design-era-algorithm-josh-clark/
    We must be cognisant of the fact that we could easily code our historical biases into the machines of the future. People who have been persecuted in the past are not outliers, they must be integrated into the fabric of our societies and we can help make that happen with technology.

    https://meanjin.com.au/essays/the-last-days-of-reality/
    Over the last two years, that capacity to manage mood has been monetised through the sharing of fake news and political feeds atuned to reader preference: you can also make people happy by confirming their biases. We all like to believe we’re in the right, and when we get some sign from the universe at large that we are correct, we feel better about ourselves. That’s how the curated newsfeed became wedded to the world of profitable propaganda.
     
     
  • Humanity: “Umbutu - I am who I am because of who we all are, and we are who we are because of who I am. I see you, I see myself.” ~Melanie Funchess, TEDx on Implicit Bias

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/13-cognitive-biases-really-screw-things-up-you-dr-travis-bradberry/
    Awareness is the best way to beat these biases, so pay careful attention to how they influence you.

    Technically Wrong Watcher-Boettcher [walk-ter Bet-cher]
    “…exposure to difference changes perspective, and increases tolerance.” ~Sara Watcher-Boettcher

    Implicit Bias -- how it effects us and how we push through | Melanie Funchess | TEDxFlourCity
    Implicit biases can make us incapable of seeing the truth before our eyes
    "We all have them. Even people who have avowed commitments to impartiality. Like judges."
    "What has been done can be undone…. Our brains have tremendous capacity for growth and change."
    Call yourself on your actions. Takes being extremely self-aware.
    "Transformational activism" - do your work
    Connect with people who don't look like you
    When you have privilege, use it to create equity
    Intentionally and deliberately engage in non-biasing activities - join groups not like you and learn and then teach others
     

  • Former diversity trainer at DOJ
  • Tact is the art of making a point without making an enemy -- Isaac Newton
  • http://www.sachajudd.com/superfan
    Biases are not inherently good or bad, but “actually a cognitive tool.  It’s all the tiny assumptions that we make as we navigate the world because we’re bombarded with too much information and our brains sort it quicker than even we can recognise.”

    https://www.fastcompany.com/3043074/how-to-thwart-your-unconscious-biases-when-hiring-a-diverse-team
    If you have a brain, you’re automatically biased. End of story.

    https://medium.com/the-mission/studies-show-that-people-who-have-high-integrative-complexity-are-more-likely-to-be-successful-443480e8930c
    Many were instrumental to our survival in an ancient world, but can lead to irrational decisions in the modern world.

    https://medium.com/mule-design/the-9-rules-of-design-research-1a273fdd1d3b
    This has nothing to do with how smart or how well-informed you are. Once you accept this, and as long as you work in a team that evinces psychological safety and mutual respect, it can be a fun game to identify biases and call them out.

    Melanie Funchess
    "What has been done can be undone…. Our brains have tremendous capacity for growth and change."
    Call yourself on your actions. Takes being extremely self-aware.

    3 design principles to help us overcome everyday bias | Thaniya Keereepart | TEDxPortland
    "The biases baked into us aren't going away overnight."
    Already changing behavior, but we need to keep at it and do things a tiny step at a time

    “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.”
    ― Jonathan Swift
    “It's not at all hard to understand a person; it's only hard to listen without bias.”
    ― Criss Jami, Killosophy
    “The eye sees only what the mind is prepared to comprehend.”
    ― Robertson Davies, Tempest-Tost
    “I have yet to see a piece of writing, political or non-political, that does not have a slant. All writing slants the way a writer leans, and no man is born perpendicular.”
    ― E.B. White
  • Laura: It’s a wonder we get anything done. KB addendum: It’s a wonder we get any of the right things done.

    What should we remember?
    Unreliability of memory
    Generalizing instinctively or selective facts
    Context of memory
    Need to act fast
    Overconfidence
    Immediacy > measured, long-term
    Inertia
    Risk aversion
    Oversimplification
    Too much information
    Reliance on familiar
    Incorrectly boosting significance
    Focus on change (anchoring!)
    Confirmation based on existing mindset (confirmation bias)
    Blind spots to our own biases
    Not enough meaning
    Invent meaning
    Fill gaps from past patterns
    Oversimplification
    Overconfidence
    Projecting our thoughts and assumptions

    https://betterhumans.coach.me/cognitive-bias-cheat-sheet-55a472476b18
    Buster Benson is writing a book on cognitive biases and arguments (Patreon). Keeps a book of his beliefs that he updates regularly.

    https://aeon.co/videos/models-are-always-imperfect-and-the-ones-we-choose-greatly-shape-our-experience
  • https://qz.com/1132948/why-philosophy-is-so-important-in-science-education/
    To approach it, I invite students to look at something nearby without any presuppositions. I then ask them to tell me what they see. They pause… and then recognize that they can’t interpret their experiences without drawing on prior ideas. Once they notice this, the idea that it can be appropriate to ask questions about objectivity in science ceases to be so strange.

    Amusement for children
    Useful tool for anyone
    Scourge on the environment
    Metaphor for disposable culture
    Unreliable and faulty
    Essential tool for people with motor skill challenges and other disabilities

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2018/06/disposable-america/563204/

    Liminal Thinking Principle: “Assume [Know] you are not objective. If you’re part of the system, you’re part of the problem.”

    Horia Varlan. https://www.flickr.com/photos/horiavarlan/4273846588/

  • https://www.aam-us.org/programs/diversity-equity-accessibility-and-inclusion/facing-change-unconscious-bias-and-personal-work/
    Many industries and professions are having a similar discussion and trying to solve the problem

    https://qz.com/1161704/silicon-valley-elite-from-companies-like-facebook-and-google-are-soothing-their-consciences-at-californias-esalen-institute/
    “Better late than never, at Esalen, techies are now studying compassion and connection with the help of specialists.”
     
    https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/j5jmj8/google-artificial-intelligence-bias

    "It's easy to get around [the bias] for each individual problem," Ernest Davis, a professor of computer science at New York University told me over the phone, "But getting around it systematically is very difficult."

    https://qz.com/1132948/why-philosophy-is-so-important-in-science-education/
    I propose an explicit division of labour. Our scientist colleagues should continue to teach the fundamentals of science, but they can help by making clear to their students that science brims with important conceptual, interpretative, methodological, and ethical issues that philosophers are uniquely situated to address, and that far from being irrelevant to science, philosophical matters lie at its heart.

    http://www.wired.co.uk/article/deepmind-ethics-and-society-artificial-intelligence
    Suleyman is bullish about his company’s efforts to not just break new frontiers in artificial intelligence technology, but also keep a grip on the ethical implications. … "putting sensitive issues, proactively, up-front, on the table, for public discussion."

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/17/technology/apple-addiction-iphone.html
    “I do think this is their time to step up,” said Tristan Harris, a former design ethicist at Google who now runs Time Well Spent, an organization working to improve technology’s impact on society.

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/mec-challenges-industry-brave-bias-130000133.html: Brave your bias challenge
  • The Art and Science of Portraiture lessons
    Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot and Jessica Hoffmann Davis

    Dan Klyn at WIAD Tampa 2018
    Dan Klyn advocates "Please Yourself" in design rather than trying to neutralize ourselves as designer, despite the idea that this would be a hard sell
    Embracing, not suppressing, our humanity in the design process increasingly seems like a good idea.

    https://qz.com/1132948/why-philosophy-is-so-important-in-science-education/
    “But all of us are ‘biased’ and our biases fuel the creative work of science. This issue can be difficult to address, because a naive conception of objectivity is so ingrained in the popular image of what science is. “

    https://associationsnow.com/2017/12/tech-conference-2017-curiosity-based-decision-making/
    But there’s a role for introspection as well. Leaders need to get to know themselves better and learn to love their vulnerabilities, Steltzer said. Often, the biggest inhibitor to curiosity is not someone else, but your own fears.

    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/blog/keeping-an-eye-on-ai-with-dr-kate-crawford/?OCID=msr_podcast_kcrawford_tw
    There is no quick technical fix to bias. It’s really tempting to want to think that there’s going to be some type of silver-bullet solution that we can just tweak our algorithms or, you know, use different sorts of training data sets, or try to boost signal in particular ways. The problem of this is that it really doesn’t look to the deep social and historical issues that human data is made from.
    Well let’s go back to FATE, because that’s kind of a big interest of yours right now. Fairness, accountability, transparency and ethics.

    Also WEIRD

    https://complexityandmanagement.wordpress.com/2012/11/23/trust-in-organisations/



  • http://whatusersdo.com/blog/how-to-fight-bias-in-your-organisation-or-team/

    Talking: If we strive for a culture where we’re having open and honest conversations, then we’ll always be mindful of everyone’s point-of-view and recognise when our own biases are surfacing.

    Self-exam: Do we need to add a specific time in the diary for regular self-reflection? If it doesn’t come naturally, then maybe we do.

    Groupthink: As Psychologists for Social Responsibility states, “A group is especially vulnerable to groupthink when its members are similar in background.”

    Transparency: Portraiture lessons

    Inclusive: Make sure a diverse team is effective by making sure all voices have a chance to speak and be heard

    https://www.fastcompany.com/3043074/how-to-thwart-your-unconscious-biases-when-hiring-a-diverse-team
    Taken together with results from hundreds of other studies, it’s clear that where raising awareness alone can fail, simple strategies–like taking a moment to focus on similarities and common identities, or slowing down to weigh all the evidence–can go a long way to increasing not only the diversity of hires in organizations, but also to creating the kind of inclusive environment that will make those hires feel like it’s worth sticking around.

    Data: Data doesn’t have bias. Researchers have bias. Challenge the questions, provide the context and background, provide raw data even
  • https://hbr.org/2015/05/outsmart-your-own-biases

    Are you biased? I am | Kristen Pressner | TEDxBasel Aug 30, 2016
    Two conversations and her reactions juxtaposed to expose a bias
    Mentally, "flip it to test it." Reverse a description or perception to the opposite (man/woman, Caucasian/Indian - If it is weird, you might have a problem
    Otherwise, You may be missing an opportunity to see the world differently.
  • https://hbr.org/2015/04/test-yourself-are-you-being-tricked-by-intuition
  • https://webdesign.tutsplus.com/articles/cognitive-biases-you-need-to-master-to-design-better-websites--cms-30742

    Confirmation bias: tendency to search for, interpret, favor, and recall information in a way that confirms one's preexisting beliefs or hypotheses
    Anchoring: the tendency for an individual to rely too heavily on an initial piece of information offered (known as the "anchor") when making decisions.

    Pro-Innovation: Belief that an innovation should be adopted by whole society without the need of its alteration
    Recency effect: Our tendency to generalize memory means we give priority to things we most recently learned

    Overconfidence: a person's subjective confidence in his or her judgements is reliably greater than the objective accuracy of those judgements,
    Backfire: given evidence against their beliefs, people can reject the evidence and believe even more strongly

    Implicit bias: the unconscious attribution of particular qualities to a member of a certain social group
    Ingroup/Outgroup: a pattern of favoring members of one's in-group over out-group members.

    http://behavioralscientist.org/behavioral-immune-system-influences-attitudes-toward-immigration/: behavioral immune system

    https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/avoiding-psychological-bias.htm
    Psychological bias is the opposite of common sense and clear, measured judgment. It can lead to missed opportunities and poor decision making.
    Confirmation bias
    Look for ways to challenge what you think you see. Seek out information from a range of sources, and use an approach such as the Six Thinking Hats technique to consider situations from multiple perspectives.
    Alternatively, discuss your thoughts with others. Surround yourself with a diverse group of people, and don't be afraid to listen to dissenting views.
    Anchoring - "first impression" bias
    reflect on your decision-making history, and think about whether you've rushed to judgment in the past.
    make time to make decisions slowly
    Overconfidence
    If you suspect that you might be depending on potentially unreliable information, think about what you can do to gather comprehensive, objective data.
    Gambler's Fallacy
    make sure that you look at trends from a number of angles
    look for trends in your environment
    Fundamental Attribution Error
    It's essential to look at situations, and the people involved in them, non-judgmentally. Use empathy and (if appropriate) cultural intelligence, to understand why people behave in the ways that they do.
    Also, build emotional intelligence, so that you can reflect accurately on your own behavior.
  • Research
    For too long we’ve focused on managing user bias. Can we manage our own?

    Recruiting
    Questions we ask
    Specific data we collect
    Conclusions and priority

    Design
    Target markets
    Types of interactions
    Visual design selections
    Technology selection
  • https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/07/the-internet-is-one-big-personality-test/531861/
    People tend to have a sense of their own character, but this sense is never complete. We know ourselves, but we don’t.

    Emergent excuses
    Time
    Budget
    Overconfidence

    Ambient understanding from AEL collaboration approach
  • https://medium.com/mule-design/the-9-rules-of-design-research-1a273fdd1d3b Erika Hall
    9. Find your bias buddies: …When it comes to interpreting the results of research, collaboration becomes particularly critical. Everyone with a human brain is burdened by human biases. And there is no way to sense one’s own. We all see what best fits our existing beliefs. So, we have to refer to an external standard (including the pre-established goals and questions) and work together to check each other

    Tech tools: sentiment analysis on team communication, present consolidated findings

    Ambient understanding from AEL collaboration approach
  • How to have non-threatening and productive discussions
    Tools for identifying our biases
    Tools to manage biases
    Bringing our new awareness into our design practice

    Are you biased? I am | Kristen Pressner | TEDxBasel Aug 30, 2016
    Worth the journey: “Otherwise, You may be missing an opportunity to see the world differently.”
     

×