Deeper DiveListening and Engagement for Program Officers<br />Beth Kanter<br />Scholar in Residence, Packard Foundation<br...
Flickr photo by netdance<br />
Agenda<br />1:00-1:45<br />How nonprofits are listeningExample from Catherine England<br />Translation:  What might listen...
Listening is research, monitoring and tracking through social media channels. <br />Listening is linked to goals and is us...
Observe and sift through qualitative data like a Primatologist<br />
A homeless <br />person isn’t <br />someone <br />you pass on <br />your way <br />into a fancy <br />restaurant<br />
Listening with Twitter Search<br />
Twitter As Focus Group<br />
Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
They think the people who work at the Smithsonian are cool<br />Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
If you were a staff person at the Smithsonian, how might you use this information?<br />
How is the Packard Foundation listening to inform communications strategy for the foundation as a whole?<br />
<ul><li>What might listening look like for a program officer?
What value does it return?</li></li></ul><li>Listening Skills Primer<br />
You Don’t Have to Be Joey Chestnut to Listen Effectively<br />
<ul><li> How much time do can you allocate to listening?
 Time for scanning and summarizing
 Commitment to making it a habit?
 What is your information coping capacity?</li></li></ul><li>Keywords Are King: Composing & Refining<br /><ul><li>Program ...
 Other nonprofit names in your space
 Program, services, and event names
  CEO or well-known personalities associated with your organization
  Other nonprofits with similar program names
  Your brand or tagline
  URLs for your blog, web site, online community
  Industry terms or other phrases </li></li></ul><li>Share Pair:   Brainstorm some key words<br />
Make Some Choices<br />
Use A RSS Reader<br />Avoiding Information Overload<br />Set up aside a small block of time to read your feeds everyday <b...
What’s the Best Thing About RSS?<br />Not here<br />
What about following philanthropy or foundation blogs or Twitter?<br />Do your grantees have blogs or on Twitter?<br />Wou...
Just read one or two that link to the many, add as you go<br />
http://pndblog.typepad.com/pndblog/<br />http://philanthropy.com/giveandtake/<br />
Let’s take a look<br />
Your Ego Feeds<br />Persistent Searches: A few live demos<br />Most overwhelming part is set upYou don’t have to be Joey C...
Engagement<br />Having a conversation with people on the social web<br />How nonprofits are using it:  Relationship buildi...
First project was a listening project over three years ago<br />People were talking and they needed to listen<br />At firs...
Listen:  Monitor, Compile, Distribute<br />
Influencer complaining …<br />Customer service issue<br />Relationship building<br />Staff determines comments or tweets t...
Happy Ending!  Givewell uses Network for Good  - nearly $70,000 raised<br />
Listens for keywords “pro bono” “volunteer”<br />
Think like your audience<br />“It is important to connect with people based on their interests (I will sometimes search tw...
Crowdsourcing the Institution’s Strategic Vision <br />
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Social Media Listening and Engagement for Program Officers

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  • Social Media Listening and Engagement for Program Officers

    1. Deeper DiveListening and Engagement for Program Officers<br />Beth Kanter<br />Scholar in Residence, Packard Foundation<br />BETA VERSION<br />
    2. Flickr photo by netdance<br />
    3. Agenda<br />1:00-1:45<br />How nonprofits are listeningExample from Catherine England<br />Translation: What might listening look like from the lens of a program officer’s work? What value does listening (even on a minima level) bring to your work?<br />1:45-2:30<br />Listening SkillsExercise: Keyword Share PairListening ToolsSetting up a listening post – live experiment2:30-2:50<br />Strategies for EngagementTechniquesTranslation: What is the value of engaging after listening for a program officer?<br />2:50-3:00Reflection: One small thing you can put into practice?<br />
    4. Listening is research, monitoring and tracking through social media channels. <br />Listening is linked to goals and is used to inform strategy. <br />Listening and engagement go hand in hand.<br />
    5. Observe and sift through qualitative data like a Primatologist<br />
    6. A homeless <br />person isn’t <br />someone <br />you pass on <br />your way <br />into a fancy <br />restaurant<br />
    7. Listening with Twitter Search<br />
    8. Twitter As Focus Group<br />
    9. Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
    10. Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
    11. Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
    12. They think the people who work at the Smithsonian are cool<br />Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
    13. Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
    14. Source: Nina Simonhttp://museumtwo.blogspot.com<br />
    15. If you were a staff person at the Smithsonian, how might you use this information?<br />
    16. How is the Packard Foundation listening to inform communications strategy for the foundation as a whole?<br />
    17. <ul><li>What might listening look like for a program officer?
    18. What value does it return?</li></li></ul><li>Listening Skills Primer<br />
    19. You Don’t Have to Be Joey Chestnut to Listen Effectively<br />
    20. <ul><li> How much time do can you allocate to listening?
    21. Time for scanning and summarizing
    22. Commitment to making it a habit?
    23. What is your information coping capacity?</li></li></ul><li>Keywords Are King: Composing & Refining<br /><ul><li>Program or Grantee Name
    24. Other nonprofit names in your space
    25. Program, services, and event names
    26. CEO or well-known personalities associated with your organization
    27. Other nonprofits with similar program names
    28. Your brand or tagline
    29. URLs for your blog, web site, online community
    30. Industry terms or other phrases </li></li></ul><li>Share Pair: Brainstorm some key words<br />
    31. Make Some Choices<br />
    32. Use A RSS Reader<br />Avoiding Information Overload<br />Set up aside a small block of time to read your feeds everyday <br />Clean house often, RSS subscriptions tend to pile up <br />Don&apos;t feel like you have to read every post on every blog, use the &quot;Mark Read&quot; option <br />
    33. What’s the Best Thing About RSS?<br />Not here<br />
    34. What about following philanthropy or foundation blogs or Twitter?<br />Do your grantees have blogs or on Twitter?<br />Would it be useful to read?<br />RSS makes that easy …<br />http://www.flickr.com/photos/brettlider/<br />
    35. Just read one or two that link to the many, add as you go<br />
    36. http://pndblog.typepad.com/pndblog/<br />http://philanthropy.com/giveandtake/<br />
    37. Let’s take a look<br />
    38. Your Ego Feeds<br />Persistent Searches: A few live demos<br />Most overwhelming part is set upYou don’t have to be Joey Chestnut: Fewer keywords, fewer sourcesUse to find grantees<br />Put into folders in your reader<br />http://socialmedia-listening.wikispaces.com/Primer+Part+3<br />
    39. Engagement<br />Having a conversation with people on the social web<br />How nonprofits are using it: Relationship building, program improvement, feedback, crowdsourcing ideas<br />Leads to mobilization, action, etc<br />Goes hand in hand with listening<br />
    40. First project was a listening project over three years ago<br />People were talking and they needed to listen<br />At first, felt like going to war, but changed internal perception of social media<br />
    41. Listen: Monitor, Compile, Distribute<br />
    42. Influencer complaining …<br />Customer service issue<br />Relationship building<br />Staff determines comments or tweets that need response<br />
    43. Happy Ending! Givewell uses Network for Good - nearly $70,000 raised<br />
    44. Listens for keywords “pro bono” “volunteer”<br />
    45. Think like your audience<br />“It is important to connect with people based on their interests (I will sometimes search twitter for &quot;kids outside&quot; and then compliment them on giving their kids a green hour!) ”<br />Danielle Brigida<br />
    46. Crowdsourcing the Institution’s Strategic Vision <br />
    47. Participation Tools<br />
    48. Less about tool, more about technique<br />Respond<br />Don’t Respond<br /><ul><li>They’ve paid you a compliment
    49. Valid client complaint
    50. If information is incorrect
    51. If you have something of value to offer
    52. Trolls
    53. Competitors
    54. Not you</li></li></ul><li>
    55. Queen of Commenting<br />
    56. <ul><li>What might engagement look like for a program officer?
    57. What value does it return?</li></li></ul><li>Read and comment on blogs<br />Think before you write!<br />What did they say well? <br />What did they miss? <br />Answer questions <br />What are other people saying <br />How does it apply to you <br />Look forward <br />Look backward <br />Ask what if?<br />
    58. <ul><li>What one small step can you do to start listening?
    59. What’s holding you back?
    60. What do you need to move forward?</li>

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