Right Tool for the Job

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  • Session 5: Overview of Measurement Tools: The Right Tool for the JobPeer Share on action learning projectsPicking the right measurement tool for the jobAshley Boyd, Momsrising Case StudyReflection QuestionsWhat's your measurable objective and KPI?What data do you need to collect?What is the best tool for the job?How will you collect?How will you report and use data?
  • Remind people to call for tech support*6 to mute conference line*7 unmuteFinish the plan for measurement pilot. Take the first steps. Figure out what's holding you back and do it. Set up an office session if you need it!
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/malinki/2621920871/sizes/o/Start recording about 2 minutes late to let people join *2
  • Session 5: Overview of Measurement Tools: The Right Tool for the JobPeer Share on action learning projectsPicking the right measurement tool for the jobAshley Boyd, Momsrising Case StudyReflection QuestionsWhat's your measurable objective and KPI?What data do you need to collect?What is the best tool for the job?How will you collect?How will you report and use data?
  • This is our agenda – we’ll pause along the way for questions.Use this #measurenp on Twitter
  • I’m keeping a public journal too – about the program and using it to reflect on what I’m learning about tracking the program against the SMART objectives. I will be tweaking as we go to get better results …. And welcome you to add your reflectionshttp://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/Beth-Kanter-Journal
  • Data Everywhere!Almost every action we perform on social media sites (that is clicking, reviewing, reading and so on) can be recordedas data. Measurement tools collect that data. The challenge for measuring all this becomes determining why it matters.Both qualitative and quantitative data is used to measure progress on your objectives: Quantitative is counting or the numbers, qualitative may explain the why the numbers are moving in a particular directionIt is relatively easy to collect data, but analysis requires more effort.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/mikebaird/3298842872/sizes/l/in/photostream/Focus Your Data CollectionSet expectations for what you want to learn. Setmeasurable objectives, but also figure out what you want to learn, pick your toolData collection in small chunks: spreadsheet aerobics, weekly collection. Add worksheet or column: What did we learn? You can automate, but since you are pulling from different sources, will require some manual tweakingRefine: expectations, collection methods, and analysis
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/43846796@N00/4287293576/sizes/l/in/photostream/Analytics and social media monitoring tools are often sold with the premise that “actionable information is just a click away,” a promise that is not usually the case. Tools are good at extracting data and crunching numbers, but the act of translating the data and numbers into valuable insights actually requires additional work. 
  • Categorize your specific social media measurement activities and relate to your objectivesSentiment (Messaging, positioning, themes)Attitudes (perceptions, behavior change, preferences, awareness)Do (Reach, Engagement, Action, Donate, Purchase)http://www.flickr.com/photos/leeontheroad/89666692/sizes/z/in/photostream/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/booleansplit/3534412370/sizes/o/in/photostream/Be A Connoisseur of Social Media MetricsKey Result Metrics: These are a handful of metrics that help you measure over-arching goals or also known as KPIsOutcome Metrics: These are metrics measure specific objective for a campaign or program that your organization is working on. This might include: awareness, engagement, attitude change, encouraging interaction, facilitating support, promoting advocacy, or encouraging innovation. Counting Metrics: These are the lowest level of metrics and represent the minutia of your different channels. This is fans, followers, visitors, and views. The list goes on and on. These are important to use to help you improve what you’re doing, but many times organizations get stuck in only tracking low-level metrics and often in an inconsistent way or without discipline. There are many different tools that you could use to do this, but don’t get distracted by that.
  • Carie’s example“We look at three things: actions taken, donations made, and customer service wins. That’s also how our department has been able to obtain more resources to handle the volume we have.” Recent campaign they tracked: http://www.bethkanter.org/million-fans/Counting Metrics: They’ve codified it for every departmentFor this campaign,  they wanted to create a celebration so that fans could engage and participate in the fun.   They wanted to create a personalized experience that makes the fans feel like they are a part of something really great that’s why they created a video and an opportunity for their fans to share their photos of their pets and why they love them.Some counting metrics they captured were:   # likes, # photo submissions, # mobile submissions, # tab views, # video views, # sharesCodified
  • Right Tool for the Job

    1. Peer Exchange Group 2: Measuring the Networked Nonprofit: Proving Results To Improve Session 5: November 17, 2011 Finding the Right Social Media Measurement Tool for the Job Beth Kanter,Visiting Scholar, Social Media and Nonprofits The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Organizational Effectiveness Program
    2. Welcome!If you experience any technical difficultieslogging into the system, please contactReady/Talk Customer support:800.843.9166Please use *6 to Mute your conferencelineWhile we are waiting, type into the chat:What is your favorite social mediameasurement tool and why?
    3. This call is beingrecorded *2 Flickr Photo by Malinki
    4. Peer Exchange Group 2: Measuring the Networked Nonprofit: Proving Results To Improve Session 5: November 17, 2011 Finding the Right Social Media Measurement Tool for the Job Beth Kanter,Visiting Scholar, Social Media and Nonprofits The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Organizational Effectiveness Program
    5. On The“wikito Today your reflections Don’t forget jot down in your Call journal”Ashley Boyd Beth Kanter Becky Jain
    6. Agenda Beth’s Reflection/Journal Peer Assist: Leadership Networks Launch Measurement Tools Overview Momsrising Case Study Next Session ReflectionAsk Your Questions and Share Your Insights in the Chat! Twitter Hashtag: #measurenp
    7. Beth’s Journal Program Outcomes At least 50% of 27 participants implement a social media measurement pilot that helps document value/results or improve social media practice by end of the Peer Group 1/2012 At least 50% of 27 participants, generate case studies and/or insightful quotes for the Measuring the Networked Nonprofit book by 1/2012http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/Beth-Kanter-Journal
    8. October
    9. QUICK POLL-Have not started planning/designing-Have started planning/designing, butnot finished because stuck or havequestions-Finished designing, haven’t startedimplementation yet-Finished designing, startedimplementing-Finished implementing
    10. CHAT:If you are finished designing, what helpedyou the most?
    11. CHAT:If you have startedplanning/designing, but not finished -why? Are you stuck? Do you havequestions? What do you need to moveforward?
    12. Social Media Measurement Pilot:Leadership & Networks Launch November 2011 12
    13. • External impact: Goals • Increase awareness about the intersection between leadership and networks • Network strategies and skills are essential for leadership • Increase demand for network approaches in the leadership development field • Encourage programs to use network strategies to evaluate impact• Internal impact: • Inspire conversations about the topic • Get a case study from a program that is implementing some recommendations from the report • Strengthen the relationship between the collaborators and supporters of the publication • Work with key champions in the networks area to create a resource directory of providers/resources 13
    14. Key points• The main, new components of this year’s launch strategy (compared to last year) are: – Champions program • Work with network providers to help develop a resource directory and host meetings – Survey and case study – Twitter chat/activity • Engaging key influencers via Twitter – Self-organizing program – Content analysis of online coverage (optional) 14
    15. Target audience• Leadership development programs• Foundations investing in leadership development and in networks• “Champions”: Network providers such as network weavers, network facilitators, network evaluators 15
    16. Ladder of engagement Download Join LLC/LNE Sign up for1 Promote report report website newsletter Write about the Participate in Help organize2 Discuss report report events event Agree to Donate to3 Take survey participate in support LNE case study 16
    17. Key metrics & tools Metric 1 Metric 2 Metric 3 Metric 4 Metric 5 Metric 6 Metric 7 Awareness Views Download Registrations Bit.ly link click- Referring site for newsletter throughs stats TOOL Google Analytics LLC Form Constant Bit.ly Google Contact Analytics Engagement Number of blog Comments Twitter Hashtag use Speaking Quality of coverage: key Endorsements (part 1) posts & articles (on FB, conversations/ opportunities message alignment, citing study LinkedIn, LLC, mentions secured accuracy of facts, LNE, etc) frequency of positive mentions TOOL Samepoint.com, Each channel Topsy Hashtracking Count Content analysis Count socialmention.c om Engagement Webinar Twitter chat LLC learning Donations Survey Case study participant Network (part 2) participants circle responses providers secured participants TOOL Gotomeetings Hashtracking Count Groundspring Google Form Count CountSelf-organizing Number of Number of meetings hosted participants TOOL Count Count 17
    18. KD Paine’s Basic StepsDefine ResultsStrategyBenchmarksMetrics – KPICostsSelect Right Tool To Collect DataTurn Data in Action
    19. Data Everywhere!
    20. Focus Your Data Collection
    21. Data to measure progress onyour objectives will come froma variety sources andmeasurement tools.
    22. Tools are good at extracting data andcrunching numbers, but the act of translatingthe data and numbers into valuable insightsactually requires additional work.
    23. The Right Tool for the Job • Sentiment ContentS Analysis • Themes • Messaging Survey • AttitudesA Research • Preferences • Behavior • ReachD Analytics • Engagement • Action KD Paine Framework
    24. Time Tracking
    25. Many Analytics Tools, Many Data PointsChannel Counting Metrics ToolEmail Open Rate, Click Platform Thru, Sign Ups, Un subscribersWeb Site Platform Downloads, Google Analytics registrations, views, conversions, time onsiteFacebook Fans, impressions, FB Insights feedback percentageTwitter Retweets, Click Crowdbooster, Bit.ly ThrusBlogs Subscribers, Views, Google Analytics, Comments per post Feedburner, WP* Plus tools that combine management with measurement and monitoring intoa one tool: Sprout Social, Thrive,
    26. Key Result Metrics Outcome Metrics Counting MetricsBe A Maven of Social Media Metrics, Not A Pack Rat
    27. Results:Actions taken, donations made, andcustomer service winsOutcome: Celebration Campaign for fansto engage and participate in funPositive responses/Screen captureCounting Metrics:# Photo submissions # shares # tab views
    28. You CAN become Metric Mavens Ashley Boyd Campaign Director, MomsRisingMomsRising.org Mamás Superándose
    29. Metrics don’t fall from the sky Organizational Mission Top Line Goals Key Results Areas Associated Metrics
    30. Mission & Top Line Goals• MomsRising Mission: To build a more truly family-friendly nation, as well as to work toward the economic equality of women and mothers.• MomsRising Top Line Goals: Grow the movement, garner media coverage to change the culture, win legislative policy changes, engage with traditionally underrepresented communities, experiment and learn new online and on-the-ground tactics, and listen to and serve our members/our constituency.
    31. Focus on Key Results Area #1Goal: Grow the Movement Matching Key Result Area: MomsRising is building a strong multicultural movement of people who care about family economic security and well-being. Associated Metrics: Weekly and annual measurement of new members, member retention, and full incorporation of MomsRising’s diversity and inclusion initiatives.Goal: Win Legislative Policy Changes Matching Key Result Area: MomsRising is exercising our power to pass family-friendly policies at the state and federal levels and to change the culture. Associated Metrics: Number of actions per year and per member, as well as the number of target policies moved forward or passed.
    32. Metrics Review Process• Metrics Monday Review of spreadsheet (we’ll take a peak at this shortly!) – full staff• Qualitative feedback (email, Facebook comments, blog comments, etc.)– full staff• Deeper analysis – smaller issue teams
    33. Metric Mondays – Action Alert Metrics Measuring Goals: • Movement Growth • Policy Change
    34. Metric Mondays – Social Media Metrics Measuring Goal: Movement Growth
    35. Metric Mondays – Website Metrics Measuring Goal: Movement Growth
    36. Qualitative Feedback
    37. Medicaid Action Alert #1
    38. Medicaid Action Alert #2
    39. Overview of Data AnalysisMember Retention (metric for Movement Growth)Alert #1 had an unsubscribe rate 4 times our historical average; Alert #2’s unsubscribe rate was averageMember Growth (metric for Movement Growth)Alert #1 generated average member growth while Alert #2 had 1 ½ times member growth, primarily FB shares 10 times our averageAction Rate (metric for Policy Change)Alert #2 had 20% higher “click rate” and 10% higher “conversion” rate than Alert #1, resulting in more overall actions.
    40. Building on Successful Messaging
    41. Final Thoughts• Measuring is important but what you measure is really important.• No “one-size-fits-all” metrics for all situations or organizations.• Choose metrics that will give you the information you need to meet your specific organizational goals/mission.
    42. Thank You ashley@momsrising.org @ashleyboyd
    43. CHAT:Reflection Questions:Whats your measurable objective andKPI?What data do you need to collect?What is the best tool for the job?How will you collect?How will you report and use data?
    44. Next Session: Overview ofMeasurement ToolsNovember 17th 11:00 am PST/ 2:00 ESTHomework: Should beimplementing, done designing.Identify what you need to move forward– what’s keeping you backOffice Hours

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