Measure the Networked Nonprofit: Peer Group

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  • Session 6: Transform Data into Wisdom and Reporting Tips for generating useful data visualizations
    Strategy for reporting results to management
    Reflection questions What is your ritual for analyzing and sense making of your data?
    How can you leverage your results through reporting?
    Presenters Arts Council of Silicon Valley - presenting measurement pilot plan Carie Lewis, Humane Society - 1 Million Facebook Fans (tentative) Danielle Yates, GEO - TOC, Logic Models and Social Media
  • Remind people to call for tech support
    *6 to mute conference line
    *7 unmute
    Finish the plan for measurement pilot. Take the first steps. Figure out what's holding you back and do it. Set up an office session if you need it!
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/malinki/2621920871/sizes/o/
    Start recording about 2 minutes late to let people join *2
  • Session 6: Transform Data into Wisdom and Reporting Tips for generating useful data visualizations
    Strategy for reporting results to management
    Reflection questions What is your ritual for analyzing and sense making of your data?
    How can you leverage your results through reporting?
    Presenters Arts Council of Silicon Valley - presenting measurement pilot plan Carie Lewis, Humane Society - 1 Million Facebook Fans (tentative) Danielle Yates, GEO - TOC, Logic Models and Social Media
  • This is our agenda – we’ll pause along the way for questions.
    Use this #measurenp on Twitter
  • I’m keeping a public journal too – about the program and using it to reflect on what I’m learning about tracking the program against the SMART objectives. I will be tweaking as we go to get better results …. And welcome you to add your reflections

    http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/Beth-Kanter-Journal
  • Make sure your data passes the sniff test

    Look at your data, and imagine you are in a conference room with your entire Board of Directors. Does the data make sense? Is there anything there that doesn’t look right to you? If it doesn’t look right to you, it certainly won’t look right to your board. If the data is accurate, make sure you have an explanation. If you find a flaw in the data, postpone the meeting until you can make sure that all the data is accurate.
     
     
  • Look for Failure First, Successes Second

    Look at your benchmarks and ask yourself:
    What didn’t work, or if everything worked to a certain extent, what were the worst performing programs? Where do we need to pay attention? What can be improved?
     
  • I didn’t post! Sad, but that’s why drives visitors – when I posted, email goes out, tweets, etc.
  • I didn’t post! Sad, but that’s why drives visitors – when I posted, email goes out, tweets, etc.
  • Data without insights is just trivia.
    Don’t present raw data

  • Data without insights is just trivia.
    Everyone can look at a chart, but few people will know what it means unless you tell them, and nothing makes a meeting go south faster than someone pointing to a PowerPoint slide and saying “There’s a big spike in June” -- people want a conclusion. As in “there’s was a big spike in online donations in June due to the effort we put into to growing our follower base.” We call these conclusionary headlines and every PowerPoint slide you show should have one. If you produce results in a Dashboard, make sure there are conclusions presented along with the data.
  • Don’t waste your time or anyone else’s.
    I don’t know what the combined time of all your board members and leadership team is worth, but chances are pretty good that it’s a large number. Which means that the first page of your report is the most expensive real estate in the world. If you get them to pay attention to your report or your dashboard for more than a minute, you should consider it a victory. Which means DO NOT WASTE THEIR TIME with numbers or graphics that do not tell your story. Just as USA Today figured out years ago, and Twitter has now reinforced, what you used to need three pages to express can now be done in 140 characters if you’re good.
  • Ask “so what” three times.
    Once again, put on your board member hat. Summon up every ounce of skepticism you’ve ever had. For ever slide, chart, table or graph, ask “So What?” .. make sure you can answer the question and relate the numbers back to the mission of your organization or at least your department. So what if our stakeholders had less opportunities to hear about us? Does it affect our online donation? Our volunteer efforts? So what if we had more Facebook likes, what changed in our ability to fill the needs in our catch basin. So what if we didn’t get our messages out? Did that give greater visibility to opposition groups? Does it mean that we have a harder time attracting and keeping talent?


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/halloweenjack/2047851060/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/
  • Rod Stewart was right
    Every picture tells a story is more than just one of the best-selling albums in history. It’s valuable advice and when it comes to presenting results, every chart, dashboard or table should tell a story. Trend data over time to indicate progress (or lack thereof.) Comparing data to peers, or comparing campaigns tells a story. Pie charts do not. Yes, pie charts are simple ways to express data, but chances are, they don’t tell much of a story, especially if there are so many slices you can’t tell what is what, or if there is only one big slice. If a chart, graph or table doesn’t tell a story, it probably doesn’t belong in your report.
  • This is an example I heard the other idea from Grist
    They are online news site for environmental issues – anyone familiar

    Getting to running
  • It takes all kinds, or at least three
    Researchers have known for years that children learn differently. Some need words to learn, others need pictures, and others just need to do. We’ll let you in on a secret. We don’t change much as we grow up. There will be people to whom you report that will only look at your words, and others that will only look at the charts and still others will only look at numbers in a table. Our recommendation is, use all three.
     
    http://www.hiscornerstone.net/category_s/162.htm
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/ucumari/389105418/

    Don’t Show it all, but have it read
  • It’s okay to mix a little alfalfa into the oats
    The biggest barrier to effective change in organizations is the silos that prevent sharing of information. In most organizations, accounting (or at least the data in the accounting department) doesn’t talk to development that doesn’t talk to public affairs. It doesn’t have to be this way. The insights that you can glean from analyzing the content of conversations with web analytics or revenue data are tell the best stories in the world. So to paraphrase Ronald Reagan “tear down those cubicles ”and take your accounting, IT and development folks out for cocktails and get to know them, and their data. You’re all on the same team and it’s hard to argue with the notion that you all want to improve.
     
  • Have the data ready when you are making decisions
    Data is like homemade bread. When it’s still in the over, not quite ready, the anticipation is huge. You can’t wait to see it. When you take it out of the oven, it’s perfect. You can use it for anything. You serve it with dinner, then have it for breakfast, and make sandwiches with it for lunch. After a while, it gets old and stale and you stick in in the freezer. A few months later you take it out and make bread pudding with it.
    When data is fresh, you can mine it for all kinds of data and insights, but the older it gets the less useful it is. Eventually, it makes for a good benchmark, but isn’t really that useful anymore. So make sure that your data is ready and at hand when you have to make decisions.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/umpqua/388856350/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • What is your ritual for analyzing and sense making of your data?
    How can you leverage your results through reporting?
  • Session 7: Reflection and Reiteration January 5 at 11:00 am PST/ 2:00 EST

    http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/Peer+Group+Review+of+Book
  • Measure the Networked Nonprofit: Peer Group

    1. Peer Exchange Group 2: Measuring the Networked Nonprofit: Proving Results To Improve Session 6: December 15, 2011 Transform Data into Wisdom and Reporting Beth Kanter, Visiting Scholar, Social Media and Nonprofits The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Organizational Effectiveness Program
    2. Welcome! If you experience any technical difficulties logging into the system, please contact Ready/Talk Customer support: 800.843.9166 Please use *6 to Mute your conference line While we are waiting, type into the chat: What is your favorite social media measurement tool and why?
    3. Flickr Photo by Malinki This call is being recorded * 2
    4. Peer Exchange Group 2: Measuring the Networked Nonprofit: Proving Results To Improve Session 6: December 15, 2011 Transform Data into Wisdom and Reporting Beth Kanter, Visiting Scholar, Social Media and Nonprofits The David and Lucile Packard Foundation Organizational Effectiveness Program
    5. Don’t forget to jot down your reflections in your “wiki journal” On The Call Today Carie Lewis Beth Kanter Becky Jain
    6. Agenda Beth’s Reflection/Journal Peer Assist: Arts Council Silicon Valley GEO Tips for Analysis and Reporting Humane Society Case Study Next Session Reflection Ask Your Questions and Share Your Insights in the Chat! Twitter Hashtag: #measurenp
    7. Beth’s Journal Program Outcomes At least 50% of 27 participants implement a social media measurement pilot that helps document value/results or improve social media practice by end of the Peer Group 1/2012 At least 50% of 27 participants, generate case studies and/or insightful quotes for the Measuring the Networked Nonprofit book by 1/2012 http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/Beth-Kanter-Journal
    8. October
    9. November
    10. CHAT: If stuck, changes in program design to avoid that situation? If you have finished planning, but not implementing, why? For next year, do you feel you’ve learned enough from planning? How to get to doing – a project that is useful, short-term, and doesn’t get stuck? (Type of project, length of program)
    11. Our Mission Arts Council Silicon Valley powers a vibrant arts and culture network. We provide grants, services, leadership, and support for arts education throughout the community. As a top funder of the arts in this region, we fuel the creative engines of Silicon Valley. Anna Weldon Director of Communications Emily Knutson Communications Specialist Communications Team www.artscouncil.org
    12. Grants: Measure the effectiveness of a social media marketing campaign in support of the Arts Council’s newly launched Artist Laureate Program. Goal- Increase awareness of the program, number of applications and online interaction/participation. Development: Measure the effectiveness of social media marketing strategies in support of gauging response – and action – to the Arts Council’s online Annual Appeal campaign. Goal- increase number of individual donations, awareness of Arts Council Silicon Valley. LiveSV.com: Successfully promote transition of Artsopolis.com to LiveSV.com. Goal- increase awareness and effectiveness of LiveSV.com platform which would result in increased engagement and participation between arts groups and their audiences and the ability to reach new and untapped audiences. Measurement Pilot Plan Status: Complete! Analyzing Results Status: In Process Status: In Process
    13. Tactics: Regularly utilized Facebook, Twitter, Constant Contact, Partner Blog and our website to reach out to local, state and national arts agencies and organizations regarding the application opportunity. Grants: Measure the effectiveness of a social media marketing campaign in support of the Arts Council’s newly launched Artist Laureate Program. Goal- Increase awareness of the program, number of applications and online interaction/participation. Strategy: Utilize social media to help increase awareness of the program & increase number/quality of Artist Laureate Applications by the November 14 deadline. Campaign length – 3 Months. Status: Complete! Analyzing Results
    14. EngagementChannels Audience/Partners Individual Artists Tools | KPIs artscouncil.org Friends of Artists Arts Organizations Sprout Social Facebook Insights Applications Received: 65 Unique Page Views for Application: 1,224 (benchmark created)
    15. Highlights: • Success! • Consistent efforts resulted in positive buzz and increased awareness. • Strengthened online relationships with key partners including the NEA, CAC, & leading local arts organizations • Increased applications from 43 to 65 – a 72% increase over last year - exceeded our SMART goal. • Created benchmarks for future campaigns. Challenges: • Further departmental support – not everyone on the social media train. • Launched new ACSV website one year ago so website benchmarks are not available. What We’ve Learned
    16. KD Paine’s Basic Steps Define Results Strategy Benchmarks Metrics – KPI Costs Select Right Tool To Collect Data Turn Data in Action
    17. Make Sure Your Data Passes The Sniff Test
    18. Look for Failure First, Successes Second Mountains and Valleys Then start digging …..
    19. Mountains and Valleys Then start digging …..
    20. DATA RORSCHACH TESTs!
    21. DATA RORSCHACH TESTs!
    22. Data without insights is just trivia.
    23. Animal News, Especially Photos Engage Our Facebook Audience
    24. Don’t waste your time or anyone else’s.
    25. Ask “so what” three times.
    26. Investing Staff Time In Social Media: The Pay Off Tracked Results: Stage 1 – Integrated into staff Stage 2 – Hired social media staff 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 160,000 180,000 0 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000 500,000 600,000 700,000 800,000 January February March April Uniques Twitter Referring Traffic Facebook Referring Traffic
    27. It takes all kinds, or at least three
    28. Don’t show all, but have it ready
    29. Tear down those cubicles
    30. Data is Like Homemade Bread
    31. CHAT: Reflection Questions: • What is your ritual for analyzing and sense making of your data? • How can you leverage your results through reporting?
    32. Next Session: January 5 at 11 PST/ 2 EST Reflection and Reiteration Homework: Should be implementing, done designing. But if your measurement pilot is based on future program, it is ok Office Hours Optional: Peer Review Book Chapter http://measure-netnon.wikispaces.com/Peer+Group+Review+of+Book

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