Children's Issues Editoral Calendar

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  • Let’s talk a little bit about how to gain attention in an age of media clutter and overload …. The importance of having an “integrated strategy” – while we are initially focusing on strenghtening your Facebook presence, Facebook alone is not enough. The media landscape today consists of four domains   Tra ditional media …. (such as CNN, NY Times) Tra digital media … (includes mostly blogs with a lot of authority like the Huffington Post) Owne d Media …. (this is your organization’s web site) Social Media … which includes social networks like Facebook, Twitter – increasingly being accessed on mobile devices   What’s interesting is that the consumer does not make the distinction – they may get their news from reading a friend’s newsfeed or hear it on NPR or follow NPR on Facebook or get email alerts, etc. While many nonprofits are aware that the media landscape has changed, most are finding it difficult to implement an effective integrated strategy to leverage it. Momsrising has done a great job of this … they engage people and encourage them to share their stories – and they in turn share those stories through all four domains.
  • When asked whether the following programs should receive no reduction, a minor reduction, or a major reduction, voters clearly protect children. In fact children’s programs are the most important to voters relative to other potential program cuts. The least popular cuts all directly affect children, including cuts to k-12 education, federal child nutrition programs, CHIP and Head Start. In fact some of our questions revealed that the public supports children’s programs as much – if not more than – seniors programs.
  • • Some programs are easy to identify as kids’ spending because they specifically target kids and no one else • Other programs and funding streams have to be divvied up because they benefit both kids and adults – for these we count only the share of spending that matches the share of recipients that are kids • For this book, we don’t count tax programs even though those contribute a lot of money to families with kids.
  • So, while it is important to have an integrated strategy – that’s at an advanced maturity of practice – and you have to start somewhere .. So let’s look at how the ladder of engagement plays out on Facebook. Scaffolding by depth of relationship is a familiar framework for many nonprofits – whether it is donors or activists have tactics that move people up the ”Ladder of Engagement.” This is how it plays out on Facebook, but think across all your channels. Let me take you through this model with a specific example … Here is a list of some of the most important qualities of fans of a brand’s Facebook Page. Some of these also translate to other social networks, including Twitter. Attention. When someone “likes” a Facebook Page, they are usually expressing their affinity for a product, brand, organization, individual or whatever or whomever is represented on the Page. But do they pay attention? In my mind, attention is, at its most basic, watching out for or noticing the status updates from brands in one’s newsfeed. Engagement. Taking attention to the next level, a good fan responds to your status updates. They not only noticed but felt compelled to react in some way, usually with a “like” on the update or (better yet) with a comment. Action: They share their personal story, they sign petition, they attend an offline event, they call their legislator A good fan not only responds to your updates but comments on other fans’ comments. Love. There are some fans who rise to the top as organic leaders of the community that forms on a Facebook Page, most commonly on its Wall, but sometimes within Discussions. These are fans to watch closely and to consider rewarding over time. Once a fan is attentive, participates, interacts and start to take the lead in conversations, you are witnessing a powerful form of loyalty to your brand. They are going beyond simply being interested in the goods or services you are offering, but are willing to spend time and energy in the social space you’ve created to align themselves with you. Wow! Your fans can easily become evangelists for your brand. What are you doing (in a transparent, generous and respectful manner) every step of the way to encourage this behavior? It is so easy to “share” what you like on Facebook. What are you doing that is worthy of sharing?
  • This model come from Gartner: http://www.gartner.com/technology/research/methodologies/hype-cycle.jsp The model helps you understand an emerging technology within the context of the industry and individual appetite for risk. You have three choices: Early Move: You are willing to combine risk taking with an understanding that risky investments don’t always pay off, you could reap the rewards of early adoption. Moderate Approach: You understand the argument for an early investment but will also insist on a sound cost/benefit analysis when new ways of doing things are not yet fully proven. Wait for maturation? If there are too many unanswered questions about the impact of the technology platform, it may be better to wait until others have been able to deliver tangible value. http://www.gartner.com/technology/research/methodologies/hype-cycle.jsp http://www.bethkanter.org/np-google/
  • Children's Issues Editoral Calendar

    1. Friending the Finish Line: Why Social Media for Child Advocacy? November 9, 2011
    2. Why Did First Focus Get Involved? www. firstfocus .net
    3. FRIENDING THE FINISH LINE: SOCIAL MEDIA NONPROFIT BEST PRACTICES Attention in An Age of Media Overload Source: Steve Rubel Source: Beth Kanter
    4. <ul><li>Lake Research Partners: </li></ul><ul><li>82-10% support for SCHIP reauthorization </li></ul><ul><ul><li>93-3% among Democrats </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>76-11% among Independents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>73-18% among Republicans </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>92-4% among Obama voters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>71-18% among McCain voters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>83-10% among born-again Christians </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>80-13% among voters in the South </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>81-14% among rural voters </li></ul></ul>Kids’ Programs Are Voters’ Priority
    5. Kids’ Programs are Voters’ Priority
    6. Leaders Say the Right Things But… Speaker Nancy Peolsi: “…what are the three most important issues facing Congress? Our children, our children, our children” (Washington Post, Dec. 21, 2009) “ Democratic Sen. Max Baucus, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, said the expansion of the Children's Health Insurance Program was the most significant development of the past 10 years” (Great Falls Tribune, Jan. 3, 2010 )
    7. Share of Total Federal Spending
    8. Activation Point: Achieving Policy Change <ul><li>Four Key Steps </li></ul><ul><li>Increase Knowledge : Data/Reports </li></ul><ul><li>Building Will : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Overcoming barriers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speak with a unified voice/working across silos </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creating a positive campaign </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stronger and coordinated communications </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Create Policy Agenda : Legislative, administrative/community change </li></ul><ul><li>Take Action : Identifying/creating windows of opportunity </li></ul>
    9. The Road Ahead: Why Social Media? <ul><li>Increase Knowledge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reports: Children’s Budget/KIDS COUNT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Letters/Testimony/Fact Sheets </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Build Will </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Create Community/Speaking With Unified Voice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improving Our Communications/Messaging </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Create Policy Agenda </li></ul><ul><li>Take Action </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify/Create Windows of Opportunity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engage Allies/Key Stakeholders </li></ul></ul>
    10. Social Media: Helping Us Attain Our Advocacy Goals <ul><li>Increase Knowledge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Draw Traffic/Attention to Your Content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Control Message/You Are Your Own Media Channel </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reach New Audiences (other groups, individuals, bloggers) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reach “Elites” (e.g, Rep. Doggett, Charles Blow, Jimmy Wayne) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Build Will </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Create Campaigns (e.g., #dontcutkids) & Community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Issue Concise/Action-Oriented Messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Costs Nothing (…okay, there is the cost of time) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Take Action </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify/Create Windows of Opportunity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engage Allies/Key Stakeholders/Decision-Makers </li></ul></ul>
    11. Social Media: Helping Us Attain Our Advocacy Goals <ul><li>Increase Knowledge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Draw Traffic/Attention to Your Own Content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Control Message/You Are Your Own Media Channel </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reach New Audiences (other groups, individuals, bloggers) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reach “Elites” (e.g, Rep. Doggett, Charles Blow, Jimmy Wayne) </li></ul></ul>
    12. Creating Buzz: Driving Traffic/Attention to Content <ul><li>Release of “Children’s Budget 2001” </li></ul><ul><li>Largest Single Day of Traffic to First Focus Website…Ever </li></ul><ul><li>Large Amount of Traffic From Facebook and Twitter </li></ul><ul><li>Costs Us Nothing When People Download Content </li></ul>
    13. Controlling Content: Creating Own Media Channel <ul><li>Publicize your own content </li></ul><ul><li>Frame issue using your own talking points, hashtags </li></ul>
    14. Social Media: Reaching “Media Elites” A report released this month by Jane Waldfogel of Columbia University and the London School of Economics paints a fascinating portrait of how smart policies and targeted investments in that country have produced stellar results.
    15. Social Media: Reaching “Other Elites”
    16. Social Media: Helping Us Attain Our Advocacy Goals <ul><li>Build Will </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Create Campaigns (e.g., #dontcutkids) & Community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Issue Concise/Action-Oriented Messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Costs Nothing (…okay, there is the cost of time) </li></ul></ul>
    17. Speak with One Voice Children at the Federal Level: Children Children’s Health Education Head Start Child Care Juvenile Justice Foster Care Home Visiting Child Safety Seats Infant Mortality Childhood Obesity Substance Abuse Bullying Even Start Healthy Start Child Abuse & Neglect Immunizations No Child Left Behind Adoption Maternal & Child Health Childhood Research Autism Child Development Pre-K Missing & Exploited Children Smoking Prevention Child Tax Credit Service Child Nutrition Build Will: Creating a Campaign and Speaking With One Voice
    18. Social Media: Building Will with “Twitter Bombs”
    19. Social Media: Helping Us Attain Our Advocacy Goals <ul><li>Take Action </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Engage Allies/Stakeholders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Different From Sign-On Letters, Which Are One Big Hit But Much More Passive </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ Rule of Six” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify/Create Windows of Opportunity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Listening/Injecting Self Into the Conversation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Opening Windows </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Creating Accountability </li></ul></ul></ul>
    20. Ladder of Love on Social Media FRIENDING THE FINISH LINE: SOCIAL MEDIA NONPROFIT BEST PRACTICES Source: Beth Kanter Why it is a good idea to get started
    21. Have A Strategy: Content Curation FRIENDING THE FINISH LINE: SOCIAL MEDIA NONPROFIT BEST PRACTICES Source: Gartner Technology Hype Cycles
    22. Controlling Content: Creating Own Media Channel <ul><li>Publicize your own content </li></ul><ul><li>Frame issue using your own talking points, hashtags </li></ul>
    23. Spreadsheet: Who is Posting What, Where, When Recycle, Repurpose, Reimagine Report Release
    24. Bruce Lesley President, First Focus [email_address] 202-657-0670 www.firstfocus.net Contact Information Children in the Budget:

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