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Becoming A Networked Nonprofit

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Becoming A Networked Nonprofit

  1. Using Social Media Effectively:Becoming A Networked Nonprofit<br />Beth Kanter, Beth’s BlogJunior Achievement Worldwide, July, 2010<br />
  2. Beth Kanter<br />http://www.bethkanter.org<br />
  3. @kanter @afine<br />http://bit.ly/networkednp<br />The Networked Nonprofit<br />
  4. Agenda<br />1:30-2:00 Introductions and Spectra Gram<br />2:00-3:00 Becoming a Networked Nonprofit<br />3:00-3:30 Break<br />3:30-4:00 Effective Social Media Strategy: Getting Started<br />4:00-5:15 Social Media Game<br />5:15-5:30 Reflection<br />Add agenda<br />
  5. http://socialmedia-strategy.wikispaces.com/ja<br />
  6. Rapid Introductions: Name, Title, JA Office<br />
  7. Your JA Social Media Network<br />Quick Poll: How many … <br />
  8. Spectra gram<br />Do you agree or disagree with these statements ……..<br /><ul><li>Social media is not worth the time investment
  9. Integrating social media into our outreach can help our JA office recruit volunteers </li></li></ul><li>What is a Networked Nonprofit?<br />
  10. Why become a Networked Nonprofit?<br />
  11. Complex social problems that outpace the capacity of any single nonprofit organization<br />Photo by me-maya<br />
  12. The Networked Nonprofit <br />
  13. In a networked world, nonprofits need to work less like this<br />Source: David Armano The Micro-Sociology of Networks<br />
  14. And more like this ….<br />Some nonprofits are born this way, others have to make the transition … slowly ..<br />With apologies to David Armano for hacking his visual! Source: The Micro-Sociology of Networks<br />
  15. Red Cross: Making the Transition to A Networked Nonprofit<br />
  16. Listen: Monitor, Compile, Distribute<br />I took an American Red Cross class I thought was less than satisfactory. […] The local chapter director. called me to talk about it honestly. They care about me and they’re willing to go the extra mile. I am now significantly more likely to take another class than I was before.” - Blogger<br />
  17. Listening Drove Adoption<br />
  18. Influencer complaining …<br />Customer service issue<br />Relationship building<br />
  19. Scale<br />JA is ahead of the game … you have a rule book! <br />
  20. January 11, 2010<br />Robust and Agile Listening and Engagement System<br />Objective: Stakeholder EmpowermentSocial Content<br />Rule Book<br />Internal Capacity Building<br />Wendy Harman, Red Cross<br />
  21. Social Media’s Role in Disaster Relief Effort in Haiti <br />
  22. What translates? What doesn’t? What resonated? <br />
  23. Simplicity<br />
  24. You want me to start Tweeting too? <br /> From scarcity to abundance …<br />
  25. You have too much to do because you do too much<br />
  26. Simplicity: Leverage your networks ..<br />
  27. A quick scan of your social media ant trails …<br />
  28. Share Pair: Simplicity<br />What could you do less of? <br />How can you leverage your network ? <br />
  29. Social Culture<br />
  30. Loss of control over their branding and marketing messages<br />Dealing with negative comments<br />Addressing personality versus organizational voice (trusting employees)<br />Make mistakes<br />Make senior staff too accessible<br />Perception of wasted of time and resources <br />Suffering from information overload already, this will cause more<br />
  31. Leaders Experience Personal Use<br />
  32. Describe results versus tools<br />
  33. “For social media success, <br />it is more important to try something new, and work on the problems as they arise, than to figure out a way to do something new without having any problems.”<br />-Clay Shirky<br />
  34. Codifying A Social Culture: Policy<br /><ul><li> Encouragement and support
  35. Why policy is needed
  36. Cases when it will be used, distributed
  37. Oversight, notifications, and legal implications
  38. Guidelines
  39. Identity and transparency
  40. Responsibility
  41. Confidentiality
  42. Judgment and common sense
  43. Best practices
  44. Tone
  45. Expertise
  46. Respect
  47. Quality
  48. Additional resources
  49. Training
  50. Operational Guidelines
  51. Escalation
  52. Policy examples available at wiki.altimetergroup.com</li></ul>Source: Charlene Li, Altimeter Group<br />
  53. Be professional, kind, discreet, authentic. Represent us well. Remember that you can’t control it once you hit “update.”<br />
  54. Testing the policies: Refining, Educating<br />
  55. Operational guidelines need to be specific and include examples<br />
  56. Greater transparency is vital for nonprofit organizations that want to embrace a broader network of individuals and organizations<br />
  57. The Nonprofit Fortress<br />
  58. Transactional: Only view people on the outside as serving one purpose: write checks<br />
  59. Transparent<br />Sponges<br />
  60. Transparent nonprofits consider everyone inside and outside of the organization resources for helping them to achieve their goals<br />
  61. Is your JA office’s work style more like a Fortress, Transactional, or Transparent?<br />
  62. The Networked Nonprofit <br />
  63. Agenda<br />1:30-2:00 Introductions and Spectra Gram<br />2:00-3:00 Becoming a Networked Nonprofit<br />3:00-3:30 Break<br />3:30-4:15 Effective Social Media Strategy: Getting Started<br />4:15-5:15 Social Media Game<br />5:15-5:30 Reflection<br />Add agenda<br />
  64. Effective Social Media Strategy<br />Networked Nonprofits know how to use social media to connect, engage, and build a network of passionate people who care about their work. <br />
  65. Principles<br /><ul><li>Alignment: Social media strategy supports program or communications objectives
  66. Listen: Uses listening and responding techniques to develop a deep understanding of the audience
  67. Engage: Uses conversation starters to engage audience
  68. Relationships: Builds relationships with influencers on social media spaces
  69. Integrated: Integrate and cross distribute content across social media channels
  70. Bridge:Uses social media to close the gap between online/offline
  71. Capacity: Allocates time and has the capacity to implement
  72. Learn: Launches small pilots and revises using the right metrics to understand what is and what isn’t working</li></li></ul><li>Alignment: Supports program of communications objective.<br />
  73. Communications and Program Assessment<br /><ul><li>Who do you want to reach?
  74. What do you want to accomplish?
  75. Where can social improve or supplement programs, services, or communications?
  76. What’s our available budget/time?
  77. What opportunities to pilot?</li></li></ul><li>Charting: What are your planned events, content, and opportunities for the year? What to socialize?<br />
  78. Listen<br />
  79. Engage: Conversation Starters<br />
  80. Relationships<br />
  81. Exploring the Relationship<br />Are you even listening to me?<br />How well do I really know you?<br />Do we have anything in common?<br />Opera San Jose, 2010 (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike)<br />
  82. Integrate: Give yourself some link love!<br />
  83. Share Across Channels<br />
  84. Takes some planning, organization, and structure<br />
  85. Some Automation, Some Manual<br />
  86. Closing the Loop with Social Media<br />
  87. Tweet Ups<br />
  88. Who is going to do the work?<br />
  89. We assert the unalienable rights of The Intern. We understand that The Intern might be a high school student, an MBA, a retiree, or anyone in between. The Intern will be taken seriously, given real work to do, be respected for their opinion, and will be patiently taught the things they don’t yet know.<br />
  90. Don’t do this to your intern ….<br />
  91. The perfect intern might be already be in your network<br />
  92. How many are hands-on with social media?How many think it is a time suck?<br />ADOLAS<br />
  93. Oh Look, A Squirrel!<br />
  94. Networked Nonprofits approach Social Media likeThomas Edison inventing the storage battery<br />
  95. Pick the Right Result<br />
  96. Identify the most important metric to measure it!<br />
  97. Spreadsheet Aerobics<br />
  98. Open-Ended Question<br />
  99. Testing, Testing, Testing<br />
  100. Principles<br /><ul><li>Alignment: Social media strategy supports program or communications objectives
  101. Listen: Uses listening and responding techniques to develop a deep understanding of the audience
  102. Engage: Uses conversation starters to engage audience
  103. Relationships: Builds relationships with influencers on social media spaces
  104. Integrated: Integrate and cross distribute content across social media channels
  105. Bridge:Uses social media to close the gap between online/offline
  106. Capacity: Allocates time and has the capacity to implement
  107. Learn: Launches small pilots and revises using the right metrics to understand what is and what isn’t working</li></li></ul><li>Agenda<br />1:30-2:00 Introductions and Spectra Gram<br />2:00-3:00 Becoming a Networked Nonprofit<br />3:00-3:30 Break<br />3:30-4:15 Effective Social Media Strategy: Getting Started<br />4:15-5:15 Social Media Game<br />5:15-5:30 Reflection<br />Add agenda<br />
  108. Ready to play the Social Media<br />Game? <br />Source: littleoslo.com - Blogpoly<br />
  109. David Wilcox<br />http://socialmedia.wikispaces.com/Social+media+game<br />
  110. Photo by Preetam Rai<br />
  111. Network Effe<br />
  112. Rules …<br /><ul><li> Value of the exercise is the discussion and how you navigate through choices
  113. Don’t get hung up if you don’t have enough context. Make it up!
  114. There are no right or wrong answers
  115. Instructions on paper and knowledge in the cards and other people at table</li></li></ul><li>Table Check<br />ReporterExperience using social media<br />Variety of job roles<br />
  116. Scenario: JA Office was to recruit potential volunteers and engage with current volunteers for their programs using social media as a channel integrated with other outreach strategies and tactics. They want to build relationships with current volunteers who will tell their friends about volunteer opportunities. The web site has a volunteer sign up mechanism. They use email newsletters, press releases, outreach to local corporations, and a variety of other channels to recruit volunteers. <br />Source: JA Dallas Fan Page<br />
  117. Process<br />Clarify audience/objective Brainstorm principles (10 minutes)<br /> Tools and Tactics (20 minutes)<br />Reports (25 minutes) <br />Reflection (5 minutes) <br />What can you apply to your JA Office social media strategy?<br />
  118. Scenario: JA Office was to recruit potential volunteers and engage with current volunteers for their programs using social media as a channel integrated with other outreach strategies and tactics. They want to build relationships with current volunteers who will tell their friends about volunteer opportunities. The web site has a volunteer sign up mechanism. They use email newsletters, press releases, outreach to local corporations, and a variety of other channels to recruit volunteers. <br />Source: JA Dallas Fan Page<br />
  119. Reflection<br />Write on index card include your name and email address<br />Share PairPopcorn<br />
  120. Thank you!<br />http://www.bethkanter.org<br />http://bit.ly/networkednp <br />Virtual Launch Party<br />June 21st<br />4-5 PM EST<br />

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