Becoming A Networked Nonprofit

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  • I wear many hats these days. I’m the CEO of Zoetica, write Beth’s Blog, and Visiting Scholar for Nonprofits and Social Media at the Packard Foundation
  • I am also the co-author of the Networked Nonprofit – along with Allison FineThree lucky webinar
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/bobcatnorth/1199505016/
  • http://twitter.com/JAofNJ/junior-achievement/members
  • It isn’t a nonprofit with an Internet Connection and a Facebook Profile …Networked Nonprofits are simple and transparent organizations. They are easy for outsiders to get in and insiders to get out. They engage people to shape and share their work in order to raise awareness of social issues, organize communities to provide services or advocate for legislation. In the long run, they are helping to make the world a safer, fairer, healthier place to live.Networked Nonprofits don’t work harder or longer than other organizations, they work differently. They engage in conversations with people beyond their walls -- lots of conversations -- to build relationships that spread their work through the network. Incorporating relationship building as a core responsibility of all staffers fundamentally changes their to-do lists. Working this way is only possible because of the advent of social media. All Networked Nonprofits are comfortable using the new social media toolset -- digital tools such as email, blogs, and Facebook that encourage two-way conversations between people, and between people and organizations, to enlarge their efforts quickly, easily and inexpensively.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicmcphee/422442291/Problem statement: Explosion in size of nonprofit sector over last twenty years, huge increase in donations and number of nonprofits, and yet the needle hasn’t moved on any serious social issue. A sector that has focused on growing individual institutions ever larger has failed to address complex social problems that outpace the capacity of any individual org. or institution to solve them.
  • Solution: Networks of individuals and institutions that reduces the burden on everyone, leverages the capacity, creativity, energy and resources of everyone to share solutions, solve problems. This changes the definition of scale for social change - was institutions now networks. http://www.flickr.com/photos/me_maya/171223061/
  • The transition of how a nonprofit goes from institution to looking like and working more like a network is what our book is aboutThe transition isn’t an easy, flip a switch – and it happens – it takes time Some nonprofits, newer ones like Mom’s Rising have networked nonprofit in their DNA, while others – institutions – make the change slowly.Way of being transforms into a way of doing
  • The transition from working like this to this – doesn’t happen over night, can’t flip a switch
  • They also know that in order to have more impact, they need to scale. They wanted to go beyond having social media be a silo in the communications department, and through the Target experience they realized the value of employee use of social networks/social media. They worked on a social media policy, guidelines and an operational manual so that anyone working in affiliates as well as national could be ambassador on social networks. The guidelines also extend to volunteers. The overall policy is encouraging, not controlling. The operational handbook gives them specific steps, examples, and tips for being effective.
  • For example, they are able to provide advice and support to their affiliates who want to use Twitter effectively. Show example of all Twitter Accountshttp://redcrosschat.org/twitter/Now they have this network set up in the event of a disaster to quickly spread news/information.Their constituents/donors/stakeholders expect them to have a presencehttp://redcrosschat.org/twitter/#comment-37060 (screen capture of this comment)Summarize: The Red Cross found value from social media – by monitoring brand, reaching out to new supporters, and mobilizing them – and they did it by following these incremental steps: listen, engagement, build relationships, mobilize and scaleIt isn’t just Red Cross that has found value in Twitter. Here’s a couple of brief examples.
  • Doing more by Theme: Explain - Feel like you have too much to do, because you do too much - do what you do best and network the rest Exercise: Surfrider - Reflection question doing lesshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/martinlabar/3248079595/Eugene Eric Kim recently gave a terrific talk at Packard on principles for online social networks. One of his principles was simplicity and used the metaphor of ant trails.   Ants leave a trail that says "I was here."  That way others can find them and connect.   Twitter is simply an ant trail.   We can leave a pulse, it is simple and easy.  It keeps the connections going. Eugene said not to focus on the content.  Leave a trail and emergence to happen.I did a very quick of your social media ant trails and was delighted to see many of the best principles for effective social media exist – and so hoping that we can have a robust conversation about best practices.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/peggycollins/2597798134/
  • Amy Boroff (@njdevmgr), development manager for Junior Achievement of NJ in Princeton [emphasis added], discovered one of her new Twitter followers was Kate Specchio (@ecsfoundation), co-founder of Morris County-based The Emily C. Specchio Foundation. Through their tweets, Amy recognized the potential for working together. They continued to communicate on Twitter in real-time, after working hours, to learn more about each respective organization. After several weeks, JANJ submitted a proposal to ECS for funding for an inaugural event: the Women's Future Leadership Forum. The ECS Foundation accepted the proposal and granted funds to help support aspiring female high school students become future leaders.
  • Organizational culture is the psychology, attitudes, and experiences and beliefs of the people who lead organizations. Culture impactsUse social media to engage people inside and outside the organization to improve programs, services, or reach communications goals. Embrace mistakes and take calculated risksReward learning and reflectionUse a “try it and fix it as we go” approach that emphasizes failing fastOvercomes organizational innertiaUnderstand and appreciate informality and individuality do not necessarily indicate a lack of professionalism and caring.Trust staff to make decisions and respond rapidly rather than craw through endless check-ins and approval processes
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/3639694353/
  • Andy Bales Union Rescue Mission
  • There is also a need to describe your social media strategy in terms of the value – how it will help you reach your goals. Many leaders are “yellow thinkers” – that is they need to see the results laid out in advance before they will say.Pre-school California – there is also a conversation about value – and that happens by connecting social media strategy to communications objectives.
  • Rewards learning and reflectionTry it and fix it approach – fail fastAppreciates individuality and that does not indicate a lack of professionalism or caringTrusts staff to make decisions and respond rapidlyIt is more important to try something new, and work on the problems as they arise, than to figure out a way to do something new without having any problems.”
  • Don’t do anything stupid – Social MediaDon’t moon anyone with camera
  • Testing of the policy – and there may be things that you didn’t think
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/stuckincustoms/444790702/Fortresses work hard to keep their communities and constituents at a distance, pushing out messages and dictating strategy rather than listening or building relationships. Fortress organizations are losing ground today because they spend an extraordinary amount of energy fearing what might happen if they open themselves up to the world. These organizations are floundering in this set-me-free world powered by social media and free agents.This trajectory changes when organizations learn to use social media and actually become their own social networks.
  • The opposite of Fortresses, Transparents can be considered as glass houses, with the organizations presumably sitting behind glass walls. However, this isn’t really transparency because a wall still exists. True transparency happens when the walls are taken down, when the distinction between inside and outside becomes blurred, and when people are let in and staffers are let out.University of California Museum of Paleontology, “Introduction to Porifera,” http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/porifera/porifera.html (accessed on May 21, 2009). Opening the Kimono in Beth’s Blog: A Day in the Life of Nonprofit Social Media Strategists and Transparency,” Beth’s Blog, posted August 3, 2009, http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2009/08/opening-the-kimino-week-on-beths-blog-a-day-in-the-life-of-nonprofit-social-media-strategists-and-tr.html (accessed September 30, 2009). 
  • Transparent organizations behave like these sponges. They are anchored, they are clear about what they do, and they know what they are trying to accomplish. However, they still let people in and out easily, and are enriched in the process. This can only happen when organizations trust that people on the outside have good intentions, a key ingredient for relationship building. Organizations are transparent when: Leadership is straightforward when talking to various audiences.Employees are accessible to reinforce the public view of the organization and to help people when appropriate.Their values are easily seen and understood.Their culture and operations are apparent to everyone inside and out.They communicate all results, good and bad. Transparent organizations consider everyone inside and outside of the organization resources for helping them to achieve their goals. Jake Brewer, the Engagement Director for the Sunlight Foundation, describes his organization’s efforts to be transparent this way: “We often ask in team meetings, 'How can the community help with this?' or 'How can this be more open?' The result is that instead of an internal email that only the team sees, all of our Twitter followers see it along with our staff.”http://www.flickr.com/photos/avelino_maestas/3886212111/sizes/o/
  • Organizations are transparent when: Leadership is straightforward when talking to various audiences.Employees are accessible to reinforce the public view of the organization and to help people when appropriate.Their values are easily seen and understood.Their culture and operations are apparent to everyone inside and out.They communicate all results, good and bad.
  • The transition of how a nonprofit goes from institution to looking like and working more like a network is what our book is aboutThe transition isn’t an easy, flip a switch – and it happens – it takes time Some nonprofits, newer ones like Mom’s Rising have networked nonprofit in their DNA, while others – institutions – make the change slowly.Way of being transforms into a way of doing
  • Social media must be aligned with your communications or program objectivesUses listening and responding techniques to develop a deep understanding of the audience. Uses conversation starters to engage your audience.Builds relationships with influencers on social media spacesIntegrate and cross distribute content across social media channelsUses social media to close the gap between online/offlineAllocates enough staff time and has the expertise to implement the strategyLaunches small pilots and reiterates using the right metrics to understand what is and what isn’t working.Assesses organizational culture and has strategies to address issues that may prevent adoption
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/brentdanley/238882398/
  • How do you get started?http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryanobjc/2712391135/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/yandle/844341197/Lay out all planned communication and marketing events and opportunities for the year and determine which ones you want to socialize …
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/garibaldi/361920500/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/stefanomaggi/3564156120/Affinity: don't look for numbersWhen looking for influencers, you must not forget that these people will help you generating a lead: it could be a subscription, a purchase, a dialogue or a thousand more actions but the influencer should push influenced to act.So let's rethink it: are you looking for someone who can reach the highest number of users?Probably not. The one you're looking for is a person that can make an impact on the followers and inspire them, move them to act and push them to spread the message he is carrying. Real influence is not measured (only) with numbers. It's fundamental to understand what kind of affinity an influencer has with the audience.Communicate the signal and wipe out the noise by choosing the right people.
  • http://www.dailyseoblog.com/2009/06/9-tools-to-measure-your-twitter-influence-reach/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/s4xton/461112546/With everything connected, now you can start thinking about ways to strengthen the bonds between your online channels, which encourages your supporters to move between them and to connect with you in multiple ways.The more channels you can use to reach a supporter, the more likely they are to see your updates, to engage in conversation, and to build a positive image of and rapport with your organization.As you develop your editorial calendar and think about what to say and where to say it, keep in the mind the strengths and weaknesses of various channels. You want to share the same basic message across all channels, but you’ll often vary the specific call to actions.For example, if you are working on a fundraising campaign, email is a better bet than social media for the direct ask for the donation, with highly visible links back to a campaign landing page and donation form on your website.But what if you want supporters to connect with others who are also giving to the same campaign? That’s where social media can be highly effective. For example, on your thank-you pages and follow-up emails, you could encourage your supporters to share a story about why they are giving to your cause on your Facebook wall. Both calls to action – donate in email and share in social media – support the overall campaign by capitalizing on the strengths of the two different channels.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/s4xton/46111http://www.flickr.com/photos/mcaven/4319012152/2546/
  • http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2010/05/icecream.html
  • Berkley Rep Use of Events: 
  • http://www.devonvsmith.com/2010/07/the-networked-nonprofit-theatre-a-manifesto-a-book-review/We assert the unalienable rights of The Intern. We understand that The Intern might be a high school student, an MBA, a retiree, or anyone in between. The Intern will be taken seriously, given real work to do, be respected for their opinion, and will be patiently taught the things they don’t yet know.
  • http://disruptology.com/10-social-media-tasks-for-summer-interns/
  • http://disruptology.com/10-social-media-tasks-for-summer-interns/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/notanartist/263545370/sizes/l/
  • Thomas Alva Edison held 1,093 patents for different inventions. Many of them, like the lightbulb, the phonograph, and the motion picture camera, were brilliant creations that have a huge influence on our everyday life. However, not everything he created was a success; he also had a few failures.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/metrolibraryarchive/4078416459/in/faves-cambodia4kidsorg/
  • Testing
  • Social media must be aligned with your communications or program objectivesUses listening and responding techniques to develop a deep understanding of the audience. Uses conversation starters to engage your audience.Builds relationships with influencers on social media spacesIntegrate and cross distribute content across social media channelsUses social media to close the gap between online/offlineAllocates enough staff time and has the expertise to implement the strategyLaunches small pilots and reiterates using the right metrics to understand what is and what isn’t working.Assesses organizational culture and has strategies to address issues that may prevent adoption
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/jrparis/66581120/
  • I wear many hats these days. I’m the CEO of Zoetica, write Beth’s Blog, and have been Visiting Scholar for Nonprofits and Social Media at the Packard Foundationv
  • Becoming A Networked Nonprofit

    1. Using Social Media Effectively:Becoming A Networked Nonprofit<br />Beth Kanter, Beth’s BlogJunior Achievement Worldwide, July, 2010<br />
    2. Beth Kanter<br />http://www.bethkanter.org<br />
    3. @kanter @afine<br />http://bit.ly/networkednp<br />The Networked Nonprofit<br />
    4. Agenda<br />1:30-2:00 Introductions and Spectra Gram<br />2:00-3:00 Becoming a Networked Nonprofit<br />3:00-3:30 Break<br />3:30-4:00 Effective Social Media Strategy: Getting Started<br />4:00-5:15 Social Media Game<br />5:15-5:30 Reflection<br />Add agenda<br />
    5. http://socialmedia-strategy.wikispaces.com/ja<br />
    6. Rapid Introductions: Name, Title, JA Office<br />
    7. Your JA Social Media Network<br />Quick Poll: How many … <br />
    8. Spectra gram<br />Do you agree or disagree with these statements ……..<br /><ul><li>Social media is not worth the time investment
    9. Integrating social media into our outreach can help our JA office recruit volunteers </li></li></ul><li>What is a Networked Nonprofit?<br />
    10. Why become a Networked Nonprofit?<br />
    11. Complex social problems that outpace the capacity of any single nonprofit organization<br />Photo by me-maya<br />
    12. The Networked Nonprofit <br />
    13. In a networked world, nonprofits need to work less like this<br />Source: David Armano The Micro-Sociology of Networks<br />
    14. And more like this ….<br />Some nonprofits are born this way, others have to make the transition … slowly ..<br />With apologies to David Armano for hacking his visual! Source: The Micro-Sociology of Networks<br />
    15. Red Cross: Making the Transition to A Networked Nonprofit<br />
    16. Listen: Monitor, Compile, Distribute<br />I took an American Red Cross class I thought was less than satisfactory. […] The local chapter director. called me to talk about it honestly. They care about me and they’re willing to go the extra mile. I am now significantly more likely to take another class than I was before.” - Blogger<br />
    17. Listening Drove Adoption<br />
    18. Influencer complaining …<br />Customer service issue<br />Relationship building<br />
    19. Scale<br />JA is ahead of the game … you have a rule book! <br />
    20. January 11, 2010<br />Robust and Agile Listening and Engagement System<br />Objective: Stakeholder EmpowermentSocial Content<br />Rule Book<br />Internal Capacity Building<br />Wendy Harman, Red Cross<br />
    21. Social Media’s Role in Disaster Relief Effort in Haiti <br />
    22. What translates? What doesn’t? What resonated? <br />
    23. Simplicity<br />
    24. You want me to start Tweeting too? <br /> From scarcity to abundance …<br />
    25. You have too much to do because you do too much<br />
    26. Simplicity: Leverage your networks ..<br />
    27. A quick scan of your social media ant trails …<br />
    28. Share Pair: Simplicity<br />What could you do less of? <br />How can you leverage your network ? <br />
    29. Social Culture<br />
    30. Loss of control over their branding and marketing messages<br />Dealing with negative comments<br />Addressing personality versus organizational voice (trusting employees)<br />Make mistakes<br />Make senior staff too accessible<br />Perception of wasted of time and resources <br />Suffering from information overload already, this will cause more<br />
    31. Leaders Experience Personal Use<br />
    32. Describe results versus tools<br />
    33. “For social media success, <br />it is more important to try something new, and work on the problems as they arise, than to figure out a way to do something new without having any problems.”<br />-Clay Shirky<br />
    34. Codifying A Social Culture: Policy<br /><ul><li> Encouragement and support
    35. Why policy is needed
    36. Cases when it will be used, distributed
    37. Oversight, notifications, and legal implications
    38. Guidelines
    39. Identity and transparency
    40. Responsibility
    41. Confidentiality
    42. Judgment and common sense
    43. Best practices
    44. Tone
    45. Expertise
    46. Respect
    47. Quality
    48. Additional resources
    49. Training
    50. Operational Guidelines
    51. Escalation
    52. Policy examples available at wiki.altimetergroup.com</li></ul>Source: Charlene Li, Altimeter Group<br />
    53. Be professional, kind, discreet, authentic. Represent us well. Remember that you can’t control it once you hit “update.”<br />
    54. Testing the policies: Refining, Educating<br />
    55. Operational guidelines need to be specific and include examples<br />
    56. Greater transparency is vital for nonprofit organizations that want to embrace a broader network of individuals and organizations<br />
    57. The Nonprofit Fortress<br />
    58. Transactional: Only view people on the outside as serving one purpose: write checks<br />
    59. Transparent<br />Sponges<br />
    60. Transparent nonprofits consider everyone inside and outside of the organization resources for helping them to achieve their goals<br />
    61. Is your JA office’s work style more like a Fortress, Transactional, or Transparent?<br />
    62. The Networked Nonprofit <br />
    63. Agenda<br />1:30-2:00 Introductions and Spectra Gram<br />2:00-3:00 Becoming a Networked Nonprofit<br />3:00-3:30 Break<br />3:30-4:15 Effective Social Media Strategy: Getting Started<br />4:15-5:15 Social Media Game<br />5:15-5:30 Reflection<br />Add agenda<br />
    64. Effective Social Media Strategy<br />Networked Nonprofits know how to use social media to connect, engage, and build a network of passionate people who care about their work. <br />
    65. Principles<br /><ul><li>Alignment: Social media strategy supports program or communications objectives
    66. Listen: Uses listening and responding techniques to develop a deep understanding of the audience
    67. Engage: Uses conversation starters to engage audience
    68. Relationships: Builds relationships with influencers on social media spaces
    69. Integrated: Integrate and cross distribute content across social media channels
    70. Bridge:Uses social media to close the gap between online/offline
    71. Capacity: Allocates time and has the capacity to implement
    72. Learn: Launches small pilots and revises using the right metrics to understand what is and what isn’t working</li></li></ul><li>Alignment: Supports program of communications objective.<br />
    73. Communications and Program Assessment<br /><ul><li>Who do you want to reach?
    74. What do you want to accomplish?
    75. Where can social improve or supplement programs, services, or communications?
    76. What’s our available budget/time?
    77. What opportunities to pilot?</li></li></ul><li>Charting: What are your planned events, content, and opportunities for the year? What to socialize?<br />
    78. Listen<br />
    79. Engage: Conversation Starters<br />
    80. Relationships<br />
    81. Exploring the Relationship<br />Are you even listening to me?<br />How well do I really know you?<br />Do we have anything in common?<br />Opera San Jose, 2010 (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike)<br />
    82. Integrate: Give yourself some link love!<br />
    83. Share Across Channels<br />
    84. Takes some planning, organization, and structure<br />
    85. Some Automation, Some Manual<br />
    86. Closing the Loop with Social Media<br />
    87. Tweet Ups<br />
    88. Who is going to do the work?<br />
    89. We assert the unalienable rights of The Intern. We understand that The Intern might be a high school student, an MBA, a retiree, or anyone in between. The Intern will be taken seriously, given real work to do, be respected for their opinion, and will be patiently taught the things they don’t yet know.<br />
    90. Don’t do this to your intern ….<br />
    91. The perfect intern might be already be in your network<br />
    92. How many are hands-on with social media?How many think it is a time suck?<br />ADOLAS<br />
    93. Oh Look, A Squirrel!<br />
    94. Networked Nonprofits approach Social Media likeThomas Edison inventing the storage battery<br />
    95. Pick the Right Result<br />
    96. Identify the most important metric to measure it!<br />
    97. Spreadsheet Aerobics<br />
    98. Open-Ended Question<br />
    99. Testing, Testing, Testing<br />
    100. Principles<br /><ul><li>Alignment: Social media strategy supports program or communications objectives
    101. Listen: Uses listening and responding techniques to develop a deep understanding of the audience
    102. Engage: Uses conversation starters to engage audience
    103. Relationships: Builds relationships with influencers on social media spaces
    104. Integrated: Integrate and cross distribute content across social media channels
    105. Bridge:Uses social media to close the gap between online/offline
    106. Capacity: Allocates time and has the capacity to implement
    107. Learn: Launches small pilots and revises using the right metrics to understand what is and what isn’t working</li></li></ul><li>Agenda<br />1:30-2:00 Introductions and Spectra Gram<br />2:00-3:00 Becoming a Networked Nonprofit<br />3:00-3:30 Break<br />3:30-4:15 Effective Social Media Strategy: Getting Started<br />4:15-5:15 Social Media Game<br />5:15-5:30 Reflection<br />Add agenda<br />
    108. Ready to play the Social Media<br />Game? <br />Source: littleoslo.com - Blogpoly<br />
    109. David Wilcox<br />http://socialmedia.wikispaces.com/Social+media+game<br />
    110. Photo by Preetam Rai<br />
    111. Network Effe<br />
    112. Rules …<br /><ul><li> Value of the exercise is the discussion and how you navigate through choices
    113. Don’t get hung up if you don’t have enough context. Make it up!
    114. There are no right or wrong answers
    115. Instructions on paper and knowledge in the cards and other people at table</li></li></ul><li>Table Check<br />ReporterExperience using social media<br />Variety of job roles<br />
    116. Scenario: JA Office was to recruit potential volunteers and engage with current volunteers for their programs using social media as a channel integrated with other outreach strategies and tactics. They want to build relationships with current volunteers who will tell their friends about volunteer opportunities. The web site has a volunteer sign up mechanism. They use email newsletters, press releases, outreach to local corporations, and a variety of other channels to recruit volunteers. <br />Source: JA Dallas Fan Page<br />
    117. Process<br />Clarify audience/objective Brainstorm principles (10 minutes)<br /> Tools and Tactics (20 minutes)<br />Reports (25 minutes) <br />Reflection (5 minutes) <br />What can you apply to your JA Office social media strategy?<br />
    118. Scenario: JA Office was to recruit potential volunteers and engage with current volunteers for their programs using social media as a channel integrated with other outreach strategies and tactics. They want to build relationships with current volunteers who will tell their friends about volunteer opportunities. The web site has a volunteer sign up mechanism. They use email newsletters, press releases, outreach to local corporations, and a variety of other channels to recruit volunteers. <br />Source: JA Dallas Fan Page<br />
    119. Reflection<br />Write on index card include your name and email address<br />Share PairPopcorn<br />
    120. Thank you!<br />http://www.bethkanter.org<br />http://bit.ly/networkednp <br />Virtual Launch Party<br />June 21st<br />4-5 PM EST<br />

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