Mobile internet is set to take off this year.  Once it goes mass market it will have a transformative effect on the way au...
Our mission is to illuminate the digital world.  How do audiences engage emotionally with digital content across platforms...
The World Cup is a massive media event that brings people together on an emotional journey.  Mobile research provides a gr...
World Cup 2010 Twitter Replay, source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/world-cup-match-replay<br />Social media is the ...
TGI POSTSCRIPT<br />We started by looking at what we knew about the audience in TGI Sport+  and followed up with some spec...
TGI POSTSCRIPT<br />Then we recruited some England fans to an online community, our World Cup Arena, for qualitative inter...
TGI POSTSCRIPT<br />During the first England match against the USA we fielded a WAP survey to find out exactly what our au...
I make sure I keep up with all the latest sporting news 76%<br />I cannot do without mobile communications  45%<br />When ...
Source: Kantar Media GB TGI Postscript 2010 Q2<br />Base: World Cup fans (n=1,235) <br />While for most home was where the...
Our community started the day before England’s opener against the USA.  We collected conversations, environments, tone and...
“<br />excited<br />special<br />football fever<br />it’s a religion<br />can’t beat that feeling<br />”<br />reason for l...
“<br />No conversation <br />& heated debate <br />= boredom!<br />”<br />Being a personal device, mobile gave us more int...
“<br />We’d all have to revert to the weather. I’d be a lot quieter!<br />”<br />Football’s a conversation starter: “I tal...
The research was conducted in their world, not ours.  Freed of the constraints of social conformity, they were empowered t...
“<br />Looking forward to <br />an easy victory<br />”<br />Excited<br />On the Saturday of the England-US match the mood ...
“<br />Getting nervous<br />”<br />Others though were more cautious: “There’s the hope that England might just do somethin...
Index vs. all fans<br />191<br />140<br />208<br />200<br />180<br />Source: Kantar Media GB TGI Postscript 2010 Q2<br />B...
45% sent or received SMS or MMS<br />16% used Facebook,<br />Twitter or another social networking site<br />21% accessed t...
“<br />As soon as the US equaliser went in (and we’d all stopped crying) everyone was on Facebook on their phones to see w...
“<br />	Felt a little deflated<br />”<br />Same old same old really<br />When the final whistle went there were three main...
“<br />for Rob Green, who is still the best keeper in England<br />”<br />Others were angry, both about the overall perfor...
“<br />Damn you ITV!!<br />”<br />But anger was greater about the ITV HD fiasco. “It really p***ed me off to be honest! No...
“<br />Not feeling worried.<br />England shouldn't <br />give up hope!<br />”<br />The third emotion was optimism.  Intere...
With all that tension hanging in the air we decided to continue with the England-Slovenia match.  We could do this because...
“<br />Our world cup starts now<br />COME ON ENGLAND!!!<br />”<br />Remarkably, most sent us further film, text and email ...
“<br />”<br />Through the remote access, paradoxically, we got closer to our fans, <br />capturing reactions to the World ...
“<br />”<br />In the films they made on their mobiles they could show as well as tell.  We saw their environments – the pu...
“<br />”<br />The immediacy of images and the humanising quality of film help bring research to life because they draw on ...
“<br />I don't believe they’ll bring in video replay technology at all… FIFA won’t admit they’re wrong and back track on c...
BRICOLAGE<br />To summarise the key points about mobile: first, we used a bricolage approach.  We integrated a variety of ...
BRICOLAGE<br />IMPACT<br />Second, the emotionality and immediacy of multimedia data became a powerful tool in telling the...
BRICOLAGE<br />IMPACT<br />CONTEXTUAL<br />Third, being a personal device, mobile transported us to their worlds.  We read...
BRICOLAGE<br />IMPACT<br />CONTEXTUAL<br />EMOTION<br />And finally, mobile also got us closer to the emotion of the momen...
Kantar Media - Mobile Qualitative Research
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Kantar Media - Mobile Qualitative Research

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  • To guide us through the emotional journey of England’s World Cup campaign, I am going to hand over to Jason, who will start by introducing our online community, the World Cup Arena.[BLANK]We started our online community of football fans the day before the opening England game against the USA, which was on Saturday 12th June. We had questions and tasks prepared for them, designed to reach beyond surface descriptions to delve into their feelings and emotions.[FEET IMAGE]We collected a wide variety of qualitative data – written and spoken, images and film – which our participants were free to share as they wished – using their mobiles, on their pcs, using email and so on. Mobile was woven into the methodology. We collected conversations, environments, tone and atmosphere, and completed tasks. All this rich data helped us build a rounded view. Each type of data was both text and context; we examined each in relation to the others and meaning was derived not just at face value but through the relationships.[POINT SCREEN] In one exercise we asked: imagine for a moment that you wake up in a different world and football doesn’t exist… We asked them to post an image to represent how they’d feel and – crucially – to explain their image.[WORDS]This deprivation fantasy revealed the fans’ passion for the game. They felt excited about the football fever. You can’t beat that feeling; it’s a religion. One even posted this image, explaining with hyperbole that football is the reason for living!
  • To guide us through the emotional journey of England’s World Cup campaign, I am going to hand over to Jason, who will start by introducing our online community, the World Cup Arena.[BLANK]We started our online community of football fans the day before the opening England game against the USA, which was on Saturday 12th June. We had questions and tasks prepared for them, designed to reach beyond surface descriptions to delve into their feelings and emotions.[FEET IMAGE]We collected a wide variety of qualitative data – written and spoken, images and film – which our participants were free to share as they wished – using their mobiles, on their pcs, using email and so on. Mobile was woven into the methodology. We collected conversations, environments, tone and atmosphere, and completed tasks. All this rich data helped us build a rounded view. Each type of data was both text and context; we examined each in relation to the others and meaning was derived not just at face value but through the relationships.[POINT SCREEN] In one exercise we asked: imagine for a moment that you wake up in a different world and football doesn’t exist… We asked them to post an image to represent how they’d feel and – crucially – to explain their image.[WORDS]This deprivation fantasy revealed the fans’ passion for the game. They felt excited about the football fever. You can’t beat that feeling; it’s a religion. One even posted this image, explaining with hyperbole that football is the reason for living!
  • The data we collected was also of high quality. Being a personal device, the mobile gave us more intimate access to their world by tapping into the emotion of their experience in the moment. This gave us more accurate and truthful data.For the participant it was convenient and easy to use. In the films they made on their mobiles they could show as well as tell. And they could decide what to share, allowing them greater comfort about participating remotely. Through the remote access, paradoxically, we got closer to our fans, capturing reactions to the World Cup as it unfolded, minimising the loss of detail.[QUOTE]So coming to this image, posted to represent a world without football, it’s clear that football’s a conversation starter. “I talk about it all the time!” one remarked; without football, “we’d all have to revert to the weather. I’d be a lot quieter!” Football’s a leveller: it brings people and nations together, they explained.
  • The data we collected was also of high quality. Being a personal device, the mobile gave us more intimate access to their world by tapping into the emotion of their experience in the moment. This gave us more accurate and truthful data.For the participant it was convenient and easy to use. In the films they made on their mobiles they could show as well as tell. And they could decide what to share, allowing them greater comfort about participating remotely. Through the remote access, paradoxically, we got closer to our fans, capturing reactions to the World Cup as it unfolded, minimising the loss of detail.[QUOTE]So coming to this image, posted to represent a world without football, it’s clear that football’s a conversation starter. “I talk about it all the time!” one remarked; without football, “we’d all have to revert to the weather. I’d be a lot quieter!” Football’s a leveller: it brings people and nations together, they explained.
  • But what was used during the match itself? Our WAP survey of 200 smartphone users, which was served during the interval just a few minutes after Robert Green had equalised for the US, revealed that two thirds had used their mobile in some way during the first half. 21% had accessed the internet, 16% had used a social networking site via their mobile, and 15% had made or received a call. A third didn’t use their phone at all.However, it seems that in the heat of the moment, it’s still more instinctive to text – nearly half did so (45%). Caught up in the emotion of the moment – right now – people are more likely to send a text than go online. No doubt that’ll change over time…
  • The motivations to use social media were to share, to console and to entertain, as you can see from this quote. “As soon as the US equaliser went in (and we’d all stopped crying) everyone was on Facebook on their phones to see what comedy insults people were posting on their status.”Social media appears to kick in after the event, allowing people to compare reactions, check the mood of others and release tension.Mobile also played a role across the campaign, with calendar reminders, automated and impromptu updates – and simply organising to meet friends.
  • The third emotion was optimism. Some of our fans were hopeful: we’re always slow starters, we’ll be fine. Interestingly, at half time, when the score was 1-all, the WAP survey recorded 76% predicting England to win. Just 19% expected to draw.
  • To guide us through the emotional journey of England’s World Cup campaign, I am going to hand over to Jason, who will start by introducing our online community, the World Cup Arena.[BLANK]We started our online community of football fans the day before the opening England game against the USA, which was on Saturday 12th June. We had questions and tasks prepared for them, designed to reach beyond surface descriptions to delve into their feelings and emotions.[FEET IMAGE]We collected a wide variety of qualitative data – written and spoken, images and film – which our participants were free to share as they wished – using their mobiles, on their pcs, using email and so on. Mobile was woven into the methodology. We collected conversations, environments, tone and atmosphere, and completed tasks. All this rich data helped us build a rounded view. Each type of data was both text and context; we examined each in relation to the others and meaning was derived not just at face value but through the relationships.[POINT SCREEN] In one exercise we asked: imagine for a moment that you wake up in a different world and football doesn’t exist… We asked them to post an image to represent how they’d feel and – crucially – to explain their image.[WORDS]This deprivation fantasy revealed the fans’ passion for the game. They felt excited about the football fever. You can’t beat that feeling; it’s a religion. One even posted this image, explaining with hyperbole that football is the reason for living!
  • Kantar Media - Mobile Qualitative Research

    1. 1. Mobile internet is set to take off this year. Once it goes mass market it will have a transformative effect on the way audiences consume media content. It will also join the armoury of research methods.<br />
    2. 2. Our mission is to illuminate the digital world. How do audiences engage emotionally with digital content across platforms? How does the mix help build audience engagement and enhance advertising effectiveness?<br />
    3. 3. The World Cup is a massive media event that brings people together on an emotional journey. Mobile research provides a great opportunity to tap into that emotion in real time.<br />
    4. 4. World Cup 2010 Twitter Replay, source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/world-cup-match-replay<br />Social media is the new phenomenon this time around. You might have seen this neat Twitter Replay tool on guardian.co.uk. But to what extent was the audience for England matches participating in social media?<br />
    5. 5. TGI POSTSCRIPT<br />We started by looking at what we knew about the audience in TGI Sport+ and followed up with some specific World Cup questions appended via Postscript, our TGI-linked omnibus service. <br />
    6. 6. TGI POSTSCRIPT<br />Then we recruited some England fans to an online community, our World Cup Arena, for qualitative interaction and immersion. And we gave them some filming tasks to complete using their mobile phones. <br />
    7. 7. TGI POSTSCRIPT<br />During the first England match against the USA we fielded a WAP survey to find out exactly what our audience was up to. And we also facilitated some post-match analysis via our online community.<br />
    8. 8. I make sure I keep up with all the latest sporting news 76%<br />I cannot do without mobile communications 45%<br />When I need information the first place I look is the internet 61%<br />Source: Kantar Media GB TGI Sport+ 2010 Q2<br />Base: Likely to follow World Cup 2010 and very interested in football (n=4,592) <br />11 million fans aged 15+ claimed they were likely to follow the World Cup and were very interested in football. They were more likely than average to be heavy internet users and also highly dependent on their mobile.<br />
    9. 9. Source: Kantar Media GB TGI Postscript 2010 Q2<br />Base: World Cup fans (n=1,235) <br />While for most home was where the action was planned, younger people claimed to be more likely to view matches out of home too. But what about beyond TV? Could a big event trigger other behaviour?<br />
    10. 10. Our community started the day before England’s opener against the USA. We collected conversations, environments, tone and atmosphere. Each was both text and context: meaning came through the relationships.<br />
    11. 11. “<br />excited<br />special<br />football fever<br />it’s a religion<br />can’t beat that feeling<br />”<br />reason for living!<br />Imagine for a moment you wake up in a different world and football doesn’t exist… This deprivation fantasy revealed the fans’ passion for the game. One posted this image to exclaim football’s the “reason for living!”<br />
    12. 12. “<br />No conversation <br />& heated debate <br />= boredom!<br />”<br />Being a personal device, mobile gave us more intimate access to their worlds by tapping into the emotion of their experience in the moment. This gave us more accurate and insightful data.<br />
    13. 13. “<br />We’d all have to revert to the weather. I’d be a lot quieter!<br />”<br />Football’s a conversation starter: “I talk about it all the time!” one remarked. Without football “we’d all have to revert to the weather.” It’s also a leveller, they explained, bringing people and nations together.<br />
    14. 14. The research was conducted in their world, not ours. Freed of the constraints of social conformity, they were empowered to tell their own stories. They became active participants rather than just respondents.<br />
    15. 15. “<br />Looking forward to <br />an easy victory<br />”<br />Excited<br />On the Saturday of the England-US match the mood was generally positive. Among some there was unbridled optimism: “Really looking forward to seeing England do well”; “I’m positive we’ll win this one.”<br />
    16. 16. “<br />Getting nervous<br />”<br />Others though were more cautious: “There’s the hope that England might just do something…” And there were some nagging doubts: “I fear we’ll go out on penalties again.”<br />
    17. 17. Index vs. all fans<br />191<br />140<br />208<br />200<br />180<br />Source: Kantar Media GB TGI Postscript 2010 Q2<br />Base: World Cup fans (All: n=1,235. Age 16-35: n=399) <br />161<br />16-34 year olds anticipated the highest levels of World Cup related communication across the whole campaign, particularly using Facebook. But what was used during the match itself?<br />
    18. 18. 45% sent or received SMS or MMS<br />16% used Facebook,<br />Twitter or another social networking site<br />21% accessed the internet<br />15% made or received a call<br />9%sent or received an email<br />35%did not use their mobile phone<br />Source: Kantar Media In-Match WAP Survey, half-time on 12 June 2010<br />Base: Smartphone users watching the England/USA match live on TV (n=207)<br />At half time, moments after Robert Green’s equaliser for the USA, our WAP survey of smartphone users revealed 65% had used their mobile during the first half. In the emotion of the moment texting won out.<br />
    19. 19. “<br />As soon as the US equaliser went in (and we’d all stopped crying) everyone was on Facebook on their phones to see what comedy insults people were posting on their status<br />”<br />Social media appears to kick in after the event, allowing people to compare reactions, check the mood of others and release tension. Mobile was also used across the campaign for calendar reminders and updates.<br />
    20. 20. “<br /> Felt a little deflated<br />”<br />Same old same old really<br />When the final whistle went there were three main reactions. First disappointment. Many felt deflated: “The highlight for me was the goal in the first three minutes. After that everything went downhill.”<br />
    21. 21. “<br />for Rob Green, who is still the best keeper in England<br />”<br />Others were angry, both about the overall performance and the goalkeeper’s howler. Though Robert Green did have one apologist who posted this. You won’t be surprised he was a West Ham supporter.<br />
    22. 22. “<br />Damn you ITV!!<br />”<br />But anger was greater about the ITV HD fiasco. “It really p***ed me off to be honest! Not just missing the goal but that a TV station can’t broadcast what they’re supposed to… Whoever’s fault it was has to be sacked.”<br />
    23. 23. “<br />Not feeling worried.<br />England shouldn't <br />give up hope!<br />”<br />The third emotion was optimism. Interestingly, at half time, when the score was one-all, our WAP survey recorded 76% predicting England to win. Just 19% expected to draw.<br />
    24. 24. With all that tension hanging in the air we decided to continue with the England-Slovenia match. We could do this because of the flexibility of the method. We’d built a community of interested and engaged followers.<br />
    25. 25. “<br />Our world cup starts now<br />COME ON ENGLAND!!!<br />”<br />Remarkably, most sent us further film, text and email feedback, even as the match was playing. At first their mood was a mixture of nerves and excitement. But with the win confidence returned.<br />
    26. 26. “<br />”<br />Through the remote access, paradoxically, we got closer to our fans, <br />capturing reactions to the World Cup as it unfolded, minimising the loss of detail.<br />
    27. 27. “<br />”<br />In the films they made on their mobiles they could show as well as tell. We saw their environments – the pub, their home, their mobile, their TV –all of which might easily have been overlooked after the event.<br />
    28. 28. “<br />”<br />The immediacy of images and the humanising quality of film help bring research to life because they draw on the emotionality of the data. But, of course, it all requires analysis and interpretation.<br />
    29. 29. “<br />I don't believe they’ll bring in video replay technology at all… FIFA won’t admit they’re wrong and back track on comments they’ve made…<br />Sent using BlackBerry® from Orange<br />”<br />Further unsolicited feedback came after the 4-1 defeat to Germany arguing for the power of film! “I don’t believe they’ll bring in video replay technology… FIFA won’t admit they’re wrong and back track…”<br />
    30. 30. BRICOLAGE<br />To summarise the key points about mobile: first, we used a bricolage approach. We integrated a variety of methods and data sources to build a holistic understanding. Mobile was an important part of that mix.<br />
    31. 31. BRICOLAGE<br />IMPACT<br />Second, the emotionality and immediacy of multimedia data became a powerful tool in telling the story and communicating the findings. But the films and other data were much more important than just that.<br />
    32. 32. BRICOLAGE<br />IMPACT<br />CONTEXTUAL<br />Third, being a personal device, mobile transported us to their worlds. We read their real time reactions, heard their excitement and saw their environments. Those worlds stimulated them to share their feelings.<br />
    33. 33. BRICOLAGE<br />IMPACT<br />CONTEXTUAL<br />EMOTION<br />And finally, mobile also got us closer to the emotion of the moment, capturing high quality data that allowed us to produce a rounded and insightful view.<br />

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