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Comic Scenes of Dr. Faustus
[ Scene: VI&VII][ Scene: VI&VII]
NAFIS KAMALNAFIS KAMAL
REG. NO.:REG. NO.: 1311600313116003
BA (Hons) in EnglishBA (Hons) in English
UNIVERSITY OF ASIA PAC...
Comic ScenesComic Scenes
• Tragedy generally emphasizes human suffering but
endswith rigid finality.
• Sometimes comic sce...
Importance of Comic ScenesImportance of Comic Scenes
• It is very difficult to hold an audience's attention with
hours of ...
Comic Scenes of Dr. FaustusComic Scenes of Dr. Faustus
Scene VIScene VI
• Lucifer ordersseven deadly sins(pride, covetousn...
 
Literary Works of DoctorFaustus
AllegoryAllegory
• The seven deadly sins (pride, covetousness, wrath,
envy, gluttony, sl...
ImageryImagery
• Hell, Haven, Good and Band angel, Sin
SymbolsSymbols
• Blood
• TheGood Angel and theEvil Angel
  
Literar...
Comic scenes of dr. faustus
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Comic scenes of dr. faustus

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Comic Scenes of Dr. Faustus (Scene: VI & VII)
Tragedy generally emphasizes human suffering but ends with rigid finality. It also criticizes hubris, self-delusion, and complacency. However, sometimes comic scenes must be included in a tragedy with a dramatic purpose. Dr. Faustus is a tragic play with the mood of dark and serious play, but there were also comic scenes. It is very difficult to hold an audience's attention with hours of serious, deep and emotional content without also having something to lighten the mood. That’s why Marlowe added comic scenes in it. Still, many critics say that Christopher Marlowe did not even write these scenes but instead say that they were written later by other playwrights. Many critics are of the opinion that the comic elements in these scenes are low and vulgar.
The literary term for such comic interludes is known as comic relief. A tragedy is bound to create tension in the mind of the audience and if this tension is not relaxed from time to time, it creates some sort of emotional weakness in the mind of the audience. Hence, comic scenes are a necessity to ease the tension and refresh the mind. There was a pressing demand from the side of Elizabethan audience for such interludes. Hence, playwrights had to introduce such comic scenes as the producers also demanded them for a successful run of the play.
In scene VI and VII, we find only three comic scenes. Science, the beginning of Scene VI, Faustus is alone in his study. Then, Mephistophilis appears and a bond is signed with the blood of Faustus. Mephistophilis gives Faustus a book of magic which contains all the knowledge that Faustus. After that Lucifer orders seven deadly sins (pride, covetousness, wrath, envy, gluttony, sloth and Lechery) to entertain Faustus. Faustus questions each of the seven sins who describe themselves. This situation provides comic relief to the audiences. This scene all along is in a serious tone. But Marlowe is converted the serious scene to comic scene.
At the end of scene VI, Dick and Robin once again provide comic relief. Robin has stolen one of Faustus’ conjuring books and wants to make all the girls in the village dance for him. He also wants to use the book to get drunk. Dick and Robin have no connection with the main theme of the play. But they have importance in this play.
Scene VI, prepares us for Faustus' entry into the comic world by telling us to observe him and Mephistophilis as they stand invisible in the court of the Pope. The Pope is mocked and struck on the head, food is snatched from his hands, eating utensils and serving vessels are dashed to the floor. Bewildered and desperately using his occult powers to save himself from the demon in his presence, the Pope stands duped, busily making the sign of the cross, lacking even the wit of Robin. This scene culminates in the mock incantation of the Friars as they; attempt to appease the ghost "crept out of Purgatory."
Doctor Faustus is not comical and poorly

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Comic scenes of dr. faustus

  1. 1. Comic Scenes of Dr. Faustus [ Scene: VI&VII][ Scene: VI&VII]
  2. 2. NAFIS KAMALNAFIS KAMAL REG. NO.:REG. NO.: 1311600313116003 BA (Hons) in EnglishBA (Hons) in English UNIVERSITY OF ASIA PACIFICUNIVERSITY OF ASIA PACIFIC
  3. 3. Comic ScenesComic Scenes • Tragedy generally emphasizes human suffering but endswith rigid finality. • Sometimes comic scenes must be included in a tragedy with adramatic purpose. • The literary term for such comic interludes is known ascomic relief.
  4. 4. Importance of Comic ScenesImportance of Comic Scenes • It is very difficult to hold an audience's attention with hours of serious, deep and emotional content without also having something to lighten themood. • Play writers use comic relief to creates some sort of emotional weaknessin themind of theaudience. • Hence, comic scenes are a necessity to ease the tension and refresh themind.
  5. 5. Comic Scenes of Dr. FaustusComic Scenes of Dr. Faustus Scene VIScene VI • Lucifer ordersseven deadly sins(pride, covetousness, wrath, envy, gluttony, sloth and Lechery) to entertain Faustus. • Robin hasstolen oneof Faustus’ conjuring books. Scene VIScene VI • Faustusand Mephistophilisasthey stand invisiblein the court of thePope.
  6. 6.   Literary Works of DoctorFaustus AllegoryAllegory • The seven deadly sins (pride, covetousness, wrath, envy, gluttony, sloth and Lechery). • TheGood and Bad Angels Comic ReliefComic Relief • Dick and Robin IronyIrony • Faustus sell his soul to Lucifer in exchange for twenty- four yearsof power, honor and earthly riches.
  7. 7. ImageryImagery • Hell, Haven, Good and Band angel, Sin SymbolsSymbols • Blood • TheGood Angel and theEvil Angel    Literary Works of DoctorFaustusLiterary Works of DoctorFaustus

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