Managing IterativeDevelopment Using      Scrum    control the chaos       © 2001-2005 Craig Murphy
Does this look familiar? Most software projects fail in          some way     Most software is buggy Most software is hard...
Iterative Development…[and Scrum!]    Can reduce the failure rate  Can reduce the number of bugs Can make software easier ...
Disclaimer One person’s view…     What works for me, might not work for you…     Not intended to be a “my method’s bett...
Agenda   Motivation   Why Focus on Iterative Development?   Setting the Scene   What is Scrum?   Scrum’s Artifacts  ...
Motivation To put my Scrum research and training to good use To adopt Scrum, albeit incrementally     No “big bang” ado...
Agenda   Motivation   Why Focus on Iterative Development?   Setting the Scene   What is Scrum?   Scrum’s Artifacts  ...
Why focus on Iterative Development? Iterative Development      Lots of small “product releases” over the project’s lifet...
Waterfall vs. Iterative Development                                                                                       ...
Why focus on Iterative Development? Traditional, Waterfall profit & loss cost curve
Why focus on Iterative Development? Iterative Development, early release profit & loss cost  curve
Agenda   Motivation   Why Focus on Iterative Development?   Setting the Scene   What is Scrum?   Scrum’s Artifacts  ...
Setting the Scene I use Scrum to manage development projects    Typically internal systems, licensed to our clients    ...
Setting the Scene I also use Scrum to manage    User Group/Community activities    Seemingly endless personal “to do li...
Agenda   Motivation   Why Focus on Iterative Development?   Setting the Scene   What is Scrum?   Scrum’s Artifacts  ...
What is Scrum? Scrum:            It’s about common sense     Is an agile, lightweight process     Can manage and contro...
The Opposite of Waterfall                            Source: “The New New Product                            Development G...
What is Scrum?                                        24 hours                      Daily Scrum                       Meet...
What is Scrum?   Scrum revolves around the ethos of simplicity, resulting in    delivery of something that moves the proj...
What is Scrum? Roles    Product Owner         Possibly a Product Manager or Project Sponsor         Marketing        ...
What is Scrum? Daily “stand up” meetings    Folks who sit down at meetings get too comfortable        They attend meeti...
What is Scrum?   Daily “stand up” meetings       Time-boxed, typically to 15 minutes            if you can’t say what y...
Agenda   Motivation   Setting the Scene   What is Scrum?   Scrum’s Artifacts   Why Scrum Works…For Me (Adopting Scrum...
Scrum’s Artifacts Scrum has remarkably few artifacts    Product Backlog    Sprint Backlog    Burndown Charts Can be m...
Product Backlog
Sprint Backlog
Burndown Example                           No work being performed                                                        ...
Burndown Example                           Work being performed, but not fast enough                                      ...
Burndown Example                               Work being performed, but too fast!                                        ...
Individual Burndown Charts                                                                           Craigs Burndown Sprin...
Agenda   Motivation   Setting the Scene   What is Scrum?   Scrum’s Artifacts   Why Scrum Works…For Me (Adopting Scrum...
Why Scrum Works…For Me It’s simple, Scrum’s three questions:    Summary of work completed to date       or    Summary o...
Why Scrum Works…For Me It’s fairly easy to convert a Sprint Backlog in to a  Microsoft Project “plan”    Despite the cos...
Why Scrum Works…For Me I’ve had some buy in to “stand up” meetings, but not  enough: we don’t practice them right now   ...
Agenda   Motivation   Setting the Scene   What is Scrum?   Scrum’s Artifacts   Why Scrum Works…For Me (Adopting Scrum...
Summary Keep asking these questions:    What is the simplest thing that can move the project     forward?    Does what ...
Summary Keep the team small and tight:    Avoid folks with Teflon shoulders – “hangers on”                              ...
Summary       Far from     Agreement           Requirements                                            Anarchy            ...
Resources (Books)           Agile Project Management with Scrum           Ken Schwaber           Microsoft Press, 2004    ...
Resources (web-sites) Scrum: It’s About Common Sense      http://www.controlchaos.com      Pay your £1, $1, €1 late-com...
Contact and Update InformationCraig MurphyUpdated slides, notes and source code:http://www.CraigMurphy.comhttp://www.devel...
Questions?
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Managing Iterative Development Using Scrum

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Managing Iterative Development Using Scrum

  1. 1. Managing IterativeDevelopment Using Scrum control the chaos © 2001-2005 Craig Murphy
  2. 2. Does this look familiar? Most software projects fail in some way Most software is buggy Most software is hard to use Dr..Neil Roodyn, International Developer, October 2004
  3. 3. Iterative Development…[and Scrum!] Can reduce the failure rate Can reduce the number of bugs Can make software easier to useCloser interaction with the customer
  4. 4. Disclaimer One person’s view…  What works for me, might not work for you…  Not intended to be a “my method’s better than your method” session Not a “nitty-gritty” project management session I will be talking about:  Why I have not adopted Scrum in its entirety  Why I adopted the parts of Scrum that I did  Why I adapted Scrum to suit my needs  How I am using Scrum, yet still “appearing” to use traditional heavyweight methods Like Scrum, this is a lightweight session   More of a Case Study perhaps…
  5. 5. Agenda Motivation Why Focus on Iterative Development? Setting the Scene What is Scrum? Scrum’s Artifacts Why Scrum Works…For Me (Adopting Scrum) Summary
  6. 6. Motivation To put my Scrum research and training to good use To adopt Scrum, albeit incrementally  No “big bang” adoption To develop a façade that [initially] looks like we’re practicing traditional project management  Traditional project management seems to revolve around the creation of often unnecessary artifacts that deliver little or no value to the project  Annoyingly, management seem to want these artifacts sooner rather than later…BDUF, “fixed” or complete project plans…
  7. 7. Agenda Motivation Why Focus on Iterative Development? Setting the Scene What is Scrum? Scrum’s Artifacts Why Scrum Works…For Me (Adopting Scrum) Summary
  8. 8. Why focus on Iterative Development? Iterative Development  Lots of small “product releases” over the project’s lifetime  As opposed to one major product release at the end  Bugs / Problems are found early  Products are usable earlier in the process  Involves the customer during each iteration Iterative Development lends itself to the Scrum modus operandi  Scrum’s artifacts promote customer involvement  They allow the customer to re-prioritise the order in which “development” work is done
  9. 9. Waterfall vs. Iterative Development Customer requirement gathering happy, early analysis & design release? development testing cost ofchange 80% of a product’s deployment value comes from 20% of its features time
  10. 10. Why focus on Iterative Development? Traditional, Waterfall profit & loss cost curve
  11. 11. Why focus on Iterative Development? Iterative Development, early release profit & loss cost curve
  12. 12. Agenda Motivation Why Focus on Iterative Development? Setting the Scene What is Scrum? Scrum’s Artifacts Why Scrum Works…For Me (Adopting Scrum) Summary
  13. 13. Setting the Scene I use Scrum to manage development projects  Typically internal systems, licensed to our clients  Borland Delphi / InterBase / SQL Server or PHP / MySQL  Pushing .NET as our recommended base platform  Rarely “new” greenfield systems, typically improvements to existing brownfield systems  Development used to by a group of three internal developers  External developers (contractors)  Moderate amount of “developer on site”  as opposed to XP’s “customer on site”
  14. 14. Setting the Scene I also use Scrum to manage  User Group/Community activities  Seemingly endless personal “to do list”  Writing / Presentation schedule
  15. 15. Agenda Motivation Why Focus on Iterative Development? Setting the Scene What is Scrum? Scrum’s Artifacts Why Scrum Works…For Me (Adopting Scrum) Summary
  16. 16. What is Scrum? Scrum: It’s about common sense  Is an agile, lightweight process  Can manage and control software and product development  Uses iterative, incremental practices  Has a simple implementation  Increases productivity  Reduces time to benefits  Embraces adaptive, empirical systems development  Is not restricted to software development projects  Embraces the opposite of the waterfall approach…
  17. 17. The Opposite of Waterfall Source: “The New New Product Development Game”, Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka, Harvard Business Review, January 1986.
  18. 18. What is Scrum? 24 hours Daily Scrum Meeting Backlog tasks 30 days expanded Sprint Backlog by team Potentially Shippable Product Backlog Product Increment As prioritized by Product Owner Source: Adapted from Agile Software Development with Scrum by Ken Schwaber and Mike Beedle.
  19. 19. What is Scrum? Scrum revolves around the ethos of simplicity, resulting in delivery of something that moves the project forward: 1. What have you done during the last 24 hours? 2. What do you plan to do in the next 24 hours? 3. What’s stopping you getting on with the work of the next 24 hours? This is useful because: 1. This is progress, it’s work completed to date 2. This is forward planning, it is work you are about to do 3. These are your impediments or obstructions, it might be things you need in order to work…more forward planning. It’s also identification of immediate risks.
  20. 20. What is Scrum? Roles  Product Owner  Possibly a Product Manager or Project Sponsor  Marketing  Internal Customer  etc.  ScrumMaster  Represents management to the project  Typically filled by a Project Manager or Team Leader  Responsible for enacting Scrum values and practices  Main job is to remove impediments and remove any politics  Project Team  5-10 members  Cross-functional: QA, Programmers, UI Designers, etc.
  21. 21. What is Scrum? Daily “stand up” meetings  Folks who sit down at meetings get too comfortable  They attend meetings for the coffee and doughnuts, not for the project’s sake  Only the ScrumMaster and the project team are allowed to talk: outsiders may listen in, but are removed should they say anything  This is all about who is committed to the project or not…
  22. 22. What is Scrum? Daily “stand up” meetings  Time-boxed, typically to 15 minutes  if you can’t say what you have to say succinctly, you’re waffling  Three questions: 1. What did you do yesterday 2. What will you do today? 3. What obstacles are in your way?  Keeping it time-boxed focuses folks minds and helps get/keep agenda items targeted at what’s important: Moving the project forward towards delivery of “something…” and identifying and removing obstacles that prevent this goal being met …that delivers business value
  23. 23. Agenda Motivation Setting the Scene What is Scrum? Scrum’s Artifacts Why Scrum Works…For Me (Adopting Scrum) Summary
  24. 24. Scrum’s Artifacts Scrum has remarkably few artifacts  Product Backlog  Sprint Backlog  Burndown Charts Can be managed using nothing more than an Excel spreadsheet  More advanced / complicated tools exist:  Expensive  Web-based – no good for the ScrumMaster/project manager who travels  Still under development
  25. 25. Product Backlog
  26. 26. Sprint Backlog
  27. 27. Burndown Example No work being performed Sprint 1 Burndown 60 50 40Hours remaining 30 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Days in Sprint
  28. 28. Burndown Example Work being performed, but not fast enough Sprint 1 Burndown 49 48 47 46Hours remaining 45 44 43 42 41 40 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Days in Sprint
  29. 29. Burndown Example Work being performed, but too fast! Sprint 1 Burndown 60 50 40Hours remaining 30 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Days in Sprint
  30. 30. Individual Burndown Charts Craigs Burndown Sprint 1 35 30 25Hours Remaining 20 15 10 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Sprint Day
  31. 31. Agenda Motivation Setting the Scene What is Scrum? Scrum’s Artifacts Why Scrum Works…For Me (Adopting Scrum) Summary
  32. 32. Why Scrum Works…For Me It’s simple, Scrum’s three questions:  Summary of work completed to date or  Summary of work complete in the last 14 days (1)  Plan of work for the next 14 days (2)  Project Issues requiring action from the Product Owner (3) I first used these three key elements of Scrum early in 2004, the [small] audience loved the simplicity
  33. 33. Why Scrum Works…For Me It’s fairly easy to convert a Sprint Backlog in to a Microsoft Project “plan”  Despite the cost of Microsoft Project licenses, upper management seem to like “charts” Sprint Backlogs and Burndown Charts are early warning indicators  Lack of progress, very visible  Not enough work or work too easy, very visible  Assumes that everybody is committed to keeping the Sprint Backlog up to date
  34. 34. Why Scrum Works…For Me I’ve had some buy in to “stand up” meetings, but not enough: we don’t practice them right now  Perhaps because Scrum expects late-comers to pay a nominal £1, $1, or €1 fine! Here’s another reason why I think some folks have objected to them:
  35. 35. Agenda Motivation Setting the Scene What is Scrum? Scrum’s Artifacts Why Scrum Works…For Me (Adopting Scrum) Summary
  36. 36. Summary Keep asking these questions:  What is the simplest thing that can move the project forward?  Does what I am doing right now move the project forward at all?  Are there any impediments that are preventing progress? “Don’t procrastinate, do something, no matter how small…” – Ken Schwaber, Vienna, April 2004
  37. 37. Summary Keep the team small and tight:  Avoid folks with Teflon shoulders – “hangers on” TM  On a recent project, our core team comprised of:  1 * business expert, with authority  1 * IT expert, with internal Time & Expense experience  1 * consultant with specific MIS implementation experience  2 * business analysts  Any larger and decisions become committee-driven:  They won’t be made in a timely fashion  Sadly, this project became committee-driven 
  38. 38. Summary Far from Agreement Requirements Anarchy Complex C om pl ic at ed Close to Simple Agreement Close to Technology Far from Certainty Certainty Source: Strategic Management and Organizational Dynamics by Ralph Stacey in Agile Software Development with Scrum by Ken Schwaber and Mike Beedle.
  39. 39. Resources (Books) Agile Project Management with Scrum Ken Schwaber Microsoft Press, 2004 ISBN 073561993X ________________________________ Agile Software Development with Scrum Ken Schwaber, Mike Beedle Prentice Hall, 2002 ISBN 0130676349
  40. 40. Resources (web-sites) Scrum: It’s About Common Sense  http://www.controlchaos.com  Pay your £1, $1, €1 late-comer fee via this site!   http://www.scrumalliance.org  http://www.mountaingoatsoftware.com  Home of Mike Cohn’s “User Stories” Methods & Tools - Articles  Improving Application Quality Using Test-Driven Development http://www.methodsandtools.com/archive/archive.php?id=20  Adaptive Project Management Using Scrum http://www.methodsandtools.com/archive/archive.php?id=18
  41. 41. Contact and Update InformationCraig MurphyUpdated slides, notes and source code:http://www.CraigMurphy.comhttp://www.developerday.co.uk
  42. 42. Questions?

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