Eating for Performance       Andrea Hacker MS, RD      PhD candidate UC Davis      Dietitian UCSF RunSafe
Carbohydrates - Review   What are they and Why they are important       Carbohydrates are your body’s primary food sourc...
Carbohydrate Foods   Most nutritious food    sources       Bread, bagels, English        muffins       Pasta, rice, pot...
Carbohydrate vs. Glycogen   Food to Storage   Carbohydrate = Glucose=Sugar=Glycogen
Glucose Use During Physical             Activity   Glucose is stored in the liver and    muscles as glycogen   During ac...
Glucose use during activity   Diet affects glycogen storage and use     How much carb a person eats influences how much ...
Glucose for use during             physical activity   Duration of activity       Within the first 20 minutes of moderat...
Glucose Use   Diet affects glycogen storage and use                            Copyright 2005 Wadsworth Group, a division...
Recommended Daily    Carbohydrate Intake for Athletes   Moderate training – exercising regularly, 5d    wk, 45min/d     ...
Eating for PerformanceBefore Practice or Competition   Eating a full meal at least 3 hours before a game or practice is e...
Recommended Carbohydreateduring exercise   30-60 g carbohydrate every hour as food and/or    liquid
Eating for PerformanceDuring Practice or Competition   Optimally, 15-20 CHO grams every 20 minutes       Food Suggestion...
Recovery from Practice or Competition   Eat as soon as you can after practice or competition.   Eating a high-carb meal ...
Hydration & Dehydration   In healthy individuals water intake    is controlled mainly by thirst. Water    is ingested as ...
Fluids and Electrolytes for            Physical Activity   The need for water surpasses the need for any other nutrient ...
Fluid during Physical Activity   Fluid replacement     Endurance athletes can lose 1.5 liters or more of fluid during   ...
Fluid during activity   Electrolyte replacement     When a person sweats, small amounts of electrolytes are lost       f...
Hydration Guidelines for       Performance - EnduranceBefore Drink at least 8 to 16 oz of fluid 2 hours before practice o...
Fluid and Physical Activity   Alcohol                             Water       Dehydrating, impairs                Hydr...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Eating for Performance (Nutrition for Runners)

3,014 views

Published on

Eating for Performance (Nutrition for Runners) was presented at the UCSF RunSafe Clinic in Feb 2012. It shows current nutritional research and data to achieve optimal performance and quick recovery after prolonged exercise, in particular running.

0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,014
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
83
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Since carbs are the typical limiting energy substrate (it will run out before fat or protein) in exercise, starting exercise with more of it in tissues should aid exercise endurance. When carb stores are depleted you quickly become fatigued and performance drops dramatically.
  • Glycemic index High glycemic index foods enter the blood quickly and are better able to resynthesize live and muscle glycogen Higher glycemic index foods – carrots, honey, rice, potatoes Lower glycemic index foods – peanuts, milk, yogurt, apples, beans
  • Don’t try something new for competition. Rehearse what you intend to do for competition during practice. early am- Get up 2-3 hours before. Finish eating 1.5 hr before the start Make sure you have a full tank of fluid and carb Practice your eating schedule before competition
  • Total body water is higher in athletes than nonathletes Athletes can lose 3-4 lbs during practice at 80 F and low humidity, and even more at higher temperatures. Athletes need to rehydrate on a timed basis rather than as a reaction to thirst. Thirst is not a good indicator of hydration. A 2% loss of body weight results in impaired performance. It appears that plain water is not the best beverage to consume following exercise to replace the water lost as sweat. The replacement of electrolytes as well as water is essential for effective rehydration Fluid intake is essential for maintaining a body temperature that maximizes performance Increase fluids 24-hours prior to practice or competition. Water is the best fluid to consume prior to practice or competition Avoid sodas and fruit juices before and during practice or competition. Can lead to hyperglycemia, fatigue and bloating Excess salt can exacerbate dehydration
  • Make sure that you enter competition well hydrated Clear urine
  • Eating for Performance (Nutrition for Runners)

    1. 1. Eating for Performance Andrea Hacker MS, RD PhD candidate UC Davis Dietitian UCSF RunSafe
    2. 2. Carbohydrates - Review What are they and Why they are important  Carbohydrates are your body’s primary food source  Carbs restore muscle energy stores depleted by the demands of training Complex vs. Simple Carbs  Complex carbs are pasta, beans, bread  Remember to choose whole wheat!  Simple carbs are sugary sweets – candy, soda, fruit drinks  Limit these in your diet
    3. 3. Carbohydrate Foods Most nutritious food sources  Bread, bagels, English muffins  Pasta, rice, potatoes, cereals  Fruit, vegetables, beans  Tortillas, rice cakes, popcorn  Baked chips, pretzels, pita bread  Crackers, yogurt, corn, waffles
    4. 4. Carbohydrate vs. Glycogen Food to Storage Carbohydrate = Glucose=Sugar=Glycogen
    5. 5. Glucose Use During Physical Activity Glucose is stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen During activity liver breaks down glycogen into glucose and releases into blood stream Glycogen stores are limited to less than 2000kcals of energy When muscle glycogen stores are depleted the muscles become fatiqued
    6. 6. Glucose use during activity Diet affects glycogen storage and use  How much carb a person eats influences how much is stored.  A high carb diet enhances endurance by enlarging glycogen stores Intensity of Activity  Moderate activities use glycogen slowly, also using fatty acids  Intense activities use glycogen quickly Lactic Acid  The product of anaerobic glycolysis (glucose breakdown)  At low intensities is readily cleared, at higher intensities it accumulates  Liver recycles it to glucose
    7. 7. Glucose for use during physical activity Duration of activity  Within the first 20 minutes of moderate activity a person uses mostly glycogen  After 20 minutes of moderate activity less glycogen is used and more fatty acids Glucose depletion  After muscle and glycogen stores are depleted nervous system function comes to a near halt  Endurance athletes try to prevent this depletion by  Eating a high carb diet  Consuming glucose during the activity  Eating carbs immediately after activity  Training muscles to store as much glucose as possible
    8. 8. Glucose Use Diet affects glycogen storage and use Copyright 2005 Wadsworth Group, a division of Thomson Learning
    9. 9. Recommended Daily Carbohydrate Intake for Athletes Moderate training – exercising regularly, 5d wk, 45min/d  5-7g carb/kg body weight Endurance training – exercising 5d wk, 60min to 4hr  7-10g carb/kg body weight Ultra endurance training – exercising 5d wk, more than 4hr  11g carb/kg body weight
    10. 10. Eating for PerformanceBefore Practice or Competition Eating a full meal at least 3 hours before a game or practice is enough time for the food to digest. A high carbohydrate meal with a little fat is ideal for pre practice or competition Eating sugar (candy, sweets, soda) before practice or competition can cause fatigue and thirst Early Morning Event  High carbohydrate meal night before  Early AM (6:00 am) light (~500 kcal) meal  Cereal, yogurt, fruit, sport bar (~70+ grams CHO) Events at other times  Eat every 3 hours as normal  Have last meal 1.5 – 2 hours before the start  Meals should be low fat and rich in carbs
    11. 11. Recommended Carbohydreateduring exercise 30-60 g carbohydrate every hour as food and/or liquid
    12. 12. Eating for PerformanceDuring Practice or Competition Optimally, 15-20 CHO grams every 20 minutes  Food Suggestions:  ½ Power Bar, 1 banana, ½ granola bar Optimally, 4-8 ounces of fluid every 20 minutes  Less than 8% CHO liquid solution (sport drinks are best choice)  16 oz Gatorade has 30 grams CHO as well  More during hot & humid conditions Plenty of fluids, for events >90 min Carb-based sports drinks help to replace fluids and electrolytes, delaying fatigue. Remember to eat immediately following to replenish your muscles!
    13. 13. Recovery from Practice or Competition Eat as soon as you can after practice or competition. Eating a high-carb meal will ensure a quick recovery. The muscles need the carbohydrate to begin replenishing spent glycogen stores  Recommendation  Eat around 200 calories within 30 minutes of finishing a long run  Primarily carbohydrate with some protein  Suggestions: Chocolate milk, bread + peanut butter, cereal and milk, banana + almonds  A small amount of protein added to the post practice or competition meal will help to increase the muscles ability to restore its energy stores
    14. 14. Hydration & Dehydration In healthy individuals water intake is controlled mainly by thirst. Water is ingested as fluid and also as part of foods The body can not store water so the amount of water lost every 24 hours must be replaced to maintain health and body efficiency Signs of dehydration  Concentrated urine  Decrease urine output  Dry mouth  Increased heart rate  Poor skin turgor  Skin tenting on the forehead  Sunken eyes .
    15. 15. Fluids and Electrolytes for Physical Activity The need for water surpasses the need for any other nutrient Water loss of 1-2% can reduce performance Water loss of 7%, a person is likely to collapse Fluid losses via sweat  Muscles produce heat as a by product of metabolism  During activity can produce 15-20 times more heat than at rest  The body cools itself by sweating  Each liter of sweat uses 600kcals and prevents an 18 degree raise in body temp
    16. 16. Fluid during Physical Activity Fluid replacement  Endurance athletes can lose 1.5 liters or more of fluid during each hour of activity  During warm weather the GI tract may not be able to absorb enough water fast enough to keep up with sweat losses Water  Everyday noncompetitive active individuals  Rapidly leaves the GI tract to enter tissues  Cools body from the inside out Sports drinks  Endurance athletes  Provides fluid and carbohydrate
    17. 17. Fluid during activity Electrolyte replacement  When a person sweats, small amounts of electrolytes are lost from the body  Sodium, potassium, chloride, magnesium  In events lasting greater than 1 hr electrolytes need to be replenished Hyponatremia  Endurance events lasting longer than 3 hours  Decrease concentration of sodium in the blood  Exercise intensity, heat, humidity can affect sweating  Sweat rates can exceed 3 liters per hour  Drinking large amounts of water causing over-hydration  Headache, vomiting, bloating/puffiness, confusion
    18. 18. Hydration Guidelines for Performance - EnduranceBefore Drink at least 8 to 16 oz of fluid 2 hours before practice or competition Drink at least 4 to 8 oz of fluid immediately before exerciseDuring Drink at least 4 to 8 oz of fluid every 15-20 min during training and competitionAfter Drink at least 8 to 16 oz of fluid after exerciseDaily Drink at least 8 oz of fluid with each meal Drink at least 8 oz of fluid between meals
    19. 19. Fluid and Physical Activity Alcohol  Water  Dehydrating, impairs  Hydrates and cools the body’s ability to regulate body body temp, hinders  Sports beverages performance  Hydrates and cools the Caffeine body, provides glucose  Not as hydrating as and electrolytes water, may limit performance

    ×