South African Extraordinary Schools Coalition
Writing effective Proposals: 4 February 2014
The Fundraising Cycle
• Proposal and
application
writing
• Maintaining
relationships and
donor reporting
• Building
relati...
This presentation will be divided into three sections:
 Planning: What you do before you write
 Writing the proposal
 F...
Before you begin….
Know why and for whom you are writing the proposal:
 Understand the donor:
 Closely aligned funding p...
Proposal Components
 Proposal summary
 Needs statement
 Organisation overview
 Impact of the project
 Outcomes / obje...
Proposal Summary
Capture the essence of the project by briefly stating:
 What the current context or situation is
 How y...
Needs statement
 Your proposal should start with a needs statement / context
 Be concise and specific
 Draw out the key...
Organisation Overview
 Some background – when the organisation was set up, by whom
and why
 The mission, vision and over...
Impact of the Project
 The general aim is the impact that you are striving to achieve
through this project - it will not ...
Objectives, activities, Indicators, Targets
Strategic
Objective
Activities Indicator for
monitoring
and evaluation
Target ...
Outcomes or Objectives
 Limit the Objectives/Outcomes to 4 or 5
 Make them SMART (Specific, Measureable, Achievable, Rea...
Activities/Process
 Activities should be very specific and state the exact process you
will go through to achieve the obj...
Methodology
This section should include your approach
 What specific methods you will use, for instance your training
tec...
Monitoring and evaluation
 How will you report on the progress of activities and objectives?
 What objectively verifiabl...
Project Plan/Matrix
A detailed project plan (if required) should include:
 Specific activities
 Specific timelines
 Out...
Budget
 The budget should be clear and easy to understand
 It should include all elements of the project, including a pr...
Conclusion
Briefly conclude the proposal and state what you are requesting from
the funder and why.
 Why the project is n...
Additional extras and appendices
Appendices: depending on what you have been asked for these could
include:
 Annual repor...
Donor Management
Go the extra mile…
 Before the proposal submission stage, build relationships with core
staff by making ...
And remember...
It’s all about the students!
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SAESC fundraising presentation: writing effective proposals 4 feb 2013

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SAESC fundraising presentation: writing effective proposals 4 feb 2013

  1. 1. South African Extraordinary Schools Coalition Writing effective Proposals: 4 February 2014
  2. 2. The Fundraising Cycle • Proposal and application writing • Maintaining relationships and donor reporting • Building relationships •Identifying suitable funders and researching their focus interests and funding process Prospecting Cultivation SolicitationStewardship
  3. 3. This presentation will be divided into three sections:  Planning: What you do before you write  Writing the proposal  Follow-up: Donor management Presentation Overview
  4. 4. Before you begin…. Know why and for whom you are writing the proposal:  Understand the donor:  Closely aligned funding priorities to your organisation’s mission and activities  Eligibility criteria which your organisation meets  Personal contact with, if possible, a senior member of the agency  The size of grant offered and grant management conditions are suitable for your project and management capacity.  Know yourself:  Who you are, what your identity is and your strengths and weaknesses  Your track record (what you have achieved)  Who are your core beneficiaries, and what impact have you made (data needed)  Have a clear project plan and design:  Know the context: the problem the project aims to address & what is causing it  The impact you want to achieve through this project  The outcomes of the project i.e. the results or changes  The objectives of the project: what the project aims to deliver  The process intended to achieve the objectives  The resources that are needed to achieve the objectives
  5. 5. Proposal Components  Proposal summary  Needs statement  Organisation overview  Impact of the project  Outcomes / objectives of the project  Description of the activities / process including the methodology you plan to use  Monitoring and evaluation  Project plan  Budget  Conclusion  Supplementary information
  6. 6. Proposal Summary Capture the essence of the project by briefly stating:  What the current context or situation is  How your organisation will address the problem using its expertise  Why this is a good way to go  Who the main beneficiaries will be  What impact will be achieved  The time period envisaged  The overall cost
  7. 7. Needs statement  Your proposal should start with a needs statement / context  Be concise and specific  Draw out the key problems which are aligned to the donor’s priorities  Back this up with statistics, preferably comparing your target group/area with others.  State the link between the problem and the work of the organisation e.g. the problem of the low matric pass rate is directly related to poor teaching, hence the need for teacher training.
  8. 8. Organisation Overview  Some background – when the organisation was set up, by whom and why  The mission, vision and overall activities  What the organisation has achieved (that is directly related to the problem described above and the donor’s priorities)  What expertise, skills and experience the main people in the organisation have and particularly those who are implementing the project
  9. 9. Impact of the Project  The general aim is the impact that you are striving to achieve through this project - it will not be achieved in the lifetime of the project  Your project only contributes towards achieving the goal/aim  Should be aligned to your own mission statements and in line with the priorities of the donor  In terms of time, it will take longer to achieve the goal than the specific objectives Impact Go on to tertiary studies, have a career, have a fulfilling life and be a good parent, community leader, role model Activities School activities: classes, study sessions, extra lessons, etc. Outcomes Students achieve a Bachelor pass matric
  10. 10. Objectives, activities, Indicators, Targets Strategic Objective Activities Indicator for monitoring and evaluation Target for 2014/2015 Target for 2015/2016 1. To support and facilitate collaboration among education stakeholders to link and spread successful practice. Convene and support community of practice meetings that focus on key strategic areas within the education sector. 1) Number of community of practice meetings 2) Number of organisations represented at community of practice meetings 3) Number of people attending community of practice meetings 1) 60 community of practice meetings held 2) 650 organisations represented at community of practice meetings 3) 1,300 people attending community of practice meetings 1) 60 community of practice meetings held 2) 800 organisations represented at community of practice meetings 3) 1,600 people attending community of practice meetings
  11. 11. Outcomes or Objectives  Limit the Objectives/Outcomes to 4 or 5  Make them SMART (Specific, Measureable, Achievable, Realistic, Timebound)  Create a clear link between the achievement of outcomes and the general aim  When writing your outcomes/objectives you should consider how they can be measured i.e. indicators for monitoring and evaluation  Do not promise the impossible, consider your capacity to deliver carefully.
  12. 12. Activities/Process  Activities should be very specific and state the exact process you will go through to achieve the objectives.  You may wish to detail your activities under each objective to show a clear pathway to achieving the outcomes.  You could include your specific outputs from each of your activities e.g. numbers of young people who will receive after-hours tutoring  Your activities and timeframes can be given in Activity Matrix/ Gannt Chart  Should be directly related to the operational budget
  13. 13. Methodology This section should include your approach  What specific methods you will use, for instance your training techniques  Partnerships, how you will gain consent to work in the school and other ethical considerations  Process for community/beneficiary participation i.e. teachers  Who will be involved - staff, project management team, teachers  How the project will be managed and who will be accountable for project outcomes and finances.
  14. 14. Monitoring and evaluation  How will you report on the progress of activities and objectives?  What objectively verifiable indicators can you use to assess your progress?  How will you evaluate the impact of the project on the beneficiaries and how will they be involved in the process?
  15. 15. Project Plan/Matrix A detailed project plan (if required) should include:  Specific activities  Specific timelines  Outputs for each step  Resources needed for each step  People responsible (optional)
  16. 16. Budget  The budget should be clear and easy to understand  It should include all elements of the project, including a proportion of overhead costs  If the funder is being asked to fund a proportion of the costs this should be clearly indicated  Do not provide detail that has not specifically been asked for as you will have to report against each line item.
  17. 17. Conclusion Briefly conclude the proposal and state what you are requesting from the funder and why.  Why the project is necessary  Why yours is the right organisation to undertake the project  Why the donor should consider the proposal, from its own point of view  What outcomes could be achieved
  18. 18. Additional extras and appendices Appendices: depending on what you have been asked for these could include:  Annual reports  Audited financial statements  Evaluation reports  Photographs  Stories from beneficiaries  Bibliography and references to back up facts
  19. 19. Donor Management Go the extra mile…  Before the proposal submission stage, build relationships with core staff by making personal contact and sending information on your projects which are in line with their priorities.  Should you not receive a response, follow-up on your proposal.  Be available for meetings, organise trips/project visits, facilitate meetings with beneficiaries and be available to answer questions.  Send the donor relevant information which may interest them and invite them to events, meetings and ask for their input (when appropriate).  If you are successful acknowledge the donor’s commitment, be compliant with all their requirements and be prompt in your response  During your funding relationship ask the donor for feedback on your engagement.
  20. 20. And remember... It’s all about the students!

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