Basic Doc Design

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Basic Doc Design

  1. 1. Visual Design Controlling the act of reading Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  2. 2. Ethos Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  3. 3. Keep it clean. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  4. 4. Readable Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  5. 5. Consistent Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  6. 6. Easy to navigate Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  7. 7. Persuasive Professional Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  8. 8. Be kind to your readers. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  9. 9. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  10. 10. SIMPLIFY. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  11. 11. Simplify for the sake of good design. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  12. 12. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  13. 13. Simplify for your own sake. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  14. 14. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  15. 15. “What can be done with fewer is done in vain with more.” Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  16. 16. Simplify for the sake of your audience. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  17. 17. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  18. 18. Principle of Least Effort Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  19. 19. Ask: Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  20. 20. What can you take out? Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  21. 21. What can you mute? Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  22. 22. How can you preserve functionality? Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  23. 23. How do visual cues direct your attention? Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  24. 24. Too much information HURTS. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  25. 25. Can you process the information on the next slide? Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  26. 26. Basic Strategies Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  27. 27. • Isolate the center of interest Basic • Insure adequate contrast Strategies between foreground and background • Use pointing devices to clearly identify your primary information • Use informative headers to teach the reader needed vocabulary. • Avoid more than 7 items per page Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  28. 28. Don’t make your reader’s head explode. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  29. 29. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  30. 30. Isolate the center of interest The key to successful communication is getting people’s attention first. If they don’t look at what you want them to look at, they certainly aren’t going to read it. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  31. 31. Isolate the center of interest The key to successful communication is getting people’s attention first. If they don’t look at what you want them to look at, they certainly aren’t going to read it. Contrast in size or color can be an important tool that declares a certain part of the page to be important. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  32. 32. • A lack of contrast between the text and the background causes great problems with readability Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  33. 33. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  34. 34. • Color must be used sparingly as an accent rather than the sole attention getter on the page Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  35. 35. • ALL CAPITAL LETTERS IS THE EQUIVALENT OF SHOUTING AND SHOULD BE AVOIDED IN MOST CASES Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  36. 36. Wednesday, October 6, 2010 ?
  37. 37. What works? Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  38. 38. Be consistent. ✦ Abrupt shifts in typefaces, styles, or sizes and shapes when there is no discernible reason for it will alienate your reader. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  39. 39. White space Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  40. 40. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  41. 41. Regularity ✦ Is the equivalent of rhythm in music ✦ People are most comfortable when they know where the next beat is going to fall Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  42. 42. Stylistic rhythm is an opportunity to emphasize key values or concerns. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  43. 43. But . . . Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  44. 44. But . . . monotony sucks Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  45. 45. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  46. 46. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  47. 47. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  48. 48. Uniformity is good Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  49. 49. (mostly) Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  50. 50. Subtle is best Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  51. 51. Demonstrate some sense of style... Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  52. 52. especially in your choice of type faces Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  53. 53. Times New Roman is the default typeface for most word processors. It dominates writing so much that using it in professional writing signals “rookie” or “I don’t care about what the document looks like.” Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  54. 54. Is that the impression you want to convey? Why not experiment with other typefaces? Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  55. 55. Baskerville Regular A traditional typeface with a degree of elegance not found in standard Times New Roman Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  56. 56. Baskerville is a proportional serif font Times New Roman is also a proportional serif font Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  57. 57. (My personal font is Georgia.) Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  58. 58. Those are all serif fonts. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  59. 59. What’s a serif? Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  60. 60. More serif typefaces: • This is Georgia. • This is Goudy Old Style. • This is Palatino. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  61. 61. Be wary of novelty typefaces. • This is braggadocio. • This is Brush Script MT • This is Colonna • This is Curlz • This is Herculanum Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  62. 62. What’s the big deal about fonts? Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  63. 63. Ethos Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  64. 64. What if you wrote everything in Curlz? • It would be harder to read, for one thing. • It also tampers with your ethos. • This is not a very professional typeface. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  65. 65. There are millions of fonts to choose from. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  66. 66. The Basics Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  67. 67. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  68. 68. Every letter is equidistant Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  69. 69. American Typewriter is also a serif font. (But unlike Times or Baskerville, it is monospace.) Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  70. 70. Kinda boring, unless you’re going for the whole film-noir (Pulp Fiction) thing Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  71. 71. Why use serif fonts? Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  72. 72. The major advantage of serif fonts are that they are more readable when large amounts of text are involved (books, reports, etc.) Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  73. 73. Sans-serif (without serifs) Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  74. 74. Sans-serif fonts are sometimes more readable for titles and headings Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  75. 75. The major problem with sans-serif fonts is that they require a great deal of “white space” around them to be readable Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  76. 76. Do not use sans-serif for your body text unless it is very short. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  77. 77. Be prepared to change your mind about fonts several times. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  78. 78. Plan ahead Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  79. 79. Use styles Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  80. 80. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  81. 81. Where things are located on the page is important— you should try to provide an interesting path for the eye to follow Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  82. 82. Remember that reading involves eye movement Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  83. 83. The “rule of thirds” is an easy way to think about the real estate of the page Paying attention to each quadrant to make sure that there is something worth looking at is a start Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  84. 84. The three most important zones on the page are 1 2 numbered on the right We look in these areas, pretty much in this order, 3 to figure out where to look next. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  85. 85. UNLESS . . . Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  86. 86. There’s something better to look at Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  87. 87. Pictures, lines, and other graphic elements can provide more control over eye-path Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  88. 88. Layout Made Easy Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  89. 89. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  90. 90. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  91. 91. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  92. 92. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  93. 93. Pay attention to where your eye goes Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  94. 94. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  95. 95. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  96. 96. It would be possible to duplicate this sophisticated layout using nothing more than text boxes and styles. Wednesday, October 6, 2010
  97. 97. Simple mechanisms often work best. Wednesday, October 6, 2010

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