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Introduction to Paule Marshall & Browngirl, Brownstones

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CAPE Literatures in English (Unit 1) - An introduction to the author Paule Marshall and her novel Browngirl, Brownstones.

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Introduction to Paule Marshall & Browngirl, Brownstones

  1. 1. Journalist, Short fiction Writer, Novelist, Essayist, Lecturer, Educator.
  2. 2.  Daughter of second-generation Barbadian immigrant parents Samuel and Ada Burke  Born in Brooklyn in 1929  As a young girl, Paule Marshall was a voracious reader  Smitten with the poet Paul Laurence Dunbar, she changed her given name from Pauline to Paule (with a silent e) when she was 12 or 13
  3. 3.  librarian for the New York Public Library  a research assistant  full-time journalist, for the once very influential African American magazine Our World (1955– 1956). Her writing assignments would take her to parts of the Caribbean and South America
  4. 4.  Married her first husband, Kenneth Marshall, in 1957  In 1958, she gave birth to her first and only child, Evan-Keith  Divorced in 1969  Married Nourry Menard in 1970  Grandmother of two
  5. 5.         Brown Girl, Brownstones (1959) Soul Clap Hands and Sing (1961) The Chosen Place, the Timeless People (1969) Reena and Other Stories (1983) Praisesong for the Widow (1983) Daughters (1991) The Fisher King (2001) Triangular Road (2009)
  6. 6.         Racism African-American experience West-Indian migration to America Women in Society – African-American women Western hegemony Ageism Sexism Self-actualisation
  7. 7.  Brownstone is a brown Triassic or Jurassic sandstone which was once a popular building material. The term is also used in the United States to refer to a terraced house (row-house) clad in this material.  Owning a brownstone was, and still is, a West Indian milestone for becoming American.
  8. 8.           Introduction/Overview Narrative Viewpoint Plot Characters Setting Context Language Themes / Issues Critical Studies Past Paper Questions
  9. 9. Journalist, Short fiction Writer, Novelist, Essayist, Lecturer, Educator.

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