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Changing India: Trends for the Near Future (October 2010)

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In our latest piece of research, Changing India: Trends for the Near Future, we examine how rising prosperity is changing relationship dynamics, moral views, consumption patterns and overall lifestyles in urban India.

In our latest piece of research, Changing India: Trends for the Near Future, we examine how rising prosperity is changing relationship dynamics, moral views, consumption patterns and overall lifestyles in urban India.

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Changing India: Trends for the Near Future (October 2010)

  1. 1. CHANGING INDIA: TRENDS FOR THE NEAR FUTURE 1 OCTOBER 2010 Photo credits (clockwise from top left): Ashok666, boltron-, hfb, HazPhotos, Sistak, judepics
  2. 2. WHAT WE’LL COVER Background and Methodology Trends in India Category-Specific Trends Flamily/Framily Snacking Holidays Married Singles Technology Is the New Signet Ring Delayed Parenthood Gifting Good Health Looking Forward—and Back Brain- and Beauty-Boosting Nutrition The Sin Economy Hamper Pamper Growing Older Younger In Conclusion
  3. 3. BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY This presentation is based on a July 2010 trends workshop held in Goa with more than 20 planners from JWT India. It is based on secondary research and analysis conducted by the JWT India planners and the New York-based global trends team. BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY
  4. 4. A DIVERSE COUNTRY India is big: • The seventh-largest country by geographical area • The world’s 11th-largest economy (in GDP terms) • The world’s second-most populous country, with 1.2 billion people • The world’s most populous democracy And unequivocally diverse: • India’s Constitution recognizes 18 major languages, and there are many hundreds of dialects. (Hindi is the official language, with English often used as a link language.) • At least six practicing religions • A wide range of regional styles in cuisine and dress • A geography of beaches, deserts and snow-covered peaks BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY
  5. 5. CONSUMER FOCUS Because of India’s diversity, it’s hard to draw generalities across the population. This presentation focuses on one subset of the population: This consumer segment makes up about 3.4-7.5 percent of the population, from 34 million to 75 million people. BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY
  6. 6. COMMON THEMES Trends don’t happen in isolation. They tend to intersect and work in tandem with each other. Here you’ll see common themes that are driving a change in relationship dynamics, moral conduct, consumption patterns and overall lifestyle in India, chief among them: The rise of the nuclear family Delayed marriages Urban migration Increased connectivity Globalization/Westernization Modernization Growing affluence Higher stress BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY
  7. 7. TRENDS IN INDIA 7 Photo credits (clockwise from top left): Ashok666, boltron-, hfb, HazPhotos, Sistak, judepics
  8. 8. FLAMILY/ FRAMILY 8 Photo credits (clockwise from top left): Ashok666, Pedro Kwezi, sanchom, Pedro Kwezi
  9. 9. THE TREND As students, single working men/women and young families migrate from their homes and safe circle of family to urban areas, they are filling emotional and physical voids by forming surrogate families with flatmates and friends. FLAMILY/FRAMILY
  10. 10. THE DRIVERS • Migration, largely because good jobs and education are concentrated in a few urban areas. • The rise of the nuclear family and decline of the extended family, which has led to greater dependence on external support systems. • The trend toward delaying marriage—between 1971 and 2001, the average age of first marriage among Indian men rose from 22.7 to 24.8; for women it increased from 17.7 to 20.2. • Financial constraints (flat sharing makes accommodation affordable): Young Indians migrating from B and C towns are less financially secure and looking to share expenses. • Emotional constraints (flocking creates security): Away from their own culture and family and exposed to the vices of city life—which can feed insecurity—people create a circle of trust via friends. • Demanding jobs, which leave little time for the biological family. It’s easier to connect with people with similar lifestyles. • Technology, which is helping people stay connected with friends (if you’re at home, you’re on Facebook or other social networks with your friends). FLAMILY/FRAMILY
  11. 11. FAMILY VS. FRIENDS* FAMILY FRIENDS With families scattered in different cities Reliance on friends grows. and countries, sibling and parental ties weaken. Families can be judgmental, inhibiting. Friends respect your independence, individualism more. Family relationships can be hierarchical, Friendships offer more liberating, guilt-free weighed down by baggage of old feuds and relationships. quarrels. 21st-century lifestyles of young urbanites Friends can be more understanding, have widened the communication gap with supportive. parents. Long hours at work, commuting leave less It’s easier to socialize with friends at the time for family. workplace. * The Circle of Frisson, Outlook India, June 25, 2007 FLAMILY/FRAMILY
  12. 12. POP CULTURE CUES Salaam Namaste is a 2005 Bollywood film about two young Roomies, which premiered in July, is a Indians who meet while working Chanel [V] series about five young Wake Up Sid is a 2009 romantic comedy in Melbourne. They decide to friends sharing a house. They help each that follows the coming of age of the move in together without other deal with career choices, dating spoiled, carefree son of a wealthy formally tying the knot. dilemmas and other modern-day issues businessman. for this demographic. This 2009 comedy hit focuses on the adventures of three roommates in a hostel at the Imperial College of Engineering. It is the highest- grossing Bollywood film in India. Airing in the major cities, international TV shows like Friends and Sex and the City also depict friends as family. FLAMILY/FRAMILY
  13. 13. MARKETING TO FRIENDS AS FAMILY Marketers are realizing that this generation needs all the basic products and services that the erstwhile joint family would need. Typical traits of this cohort include: They are time-crunched (easy-to-make and ready-to-eat packaged food, quick-service home deliveries, meal- combo packs) Communications for Airtel’s Special 5—a feature that allows customers to stay in They find it difficult to juggle their work, social lives and touch with five other subscribers at low rates—center around friends, not family. health (debit-credit lifestyle products, such as energy In this commercial, a schoolgirl plays drinks, fortified functional foods, etc.) with a paper boat; her five special friends rescue her boat when rain Their lifestyle needs are functional (compact utilitarian threatens its voyage. furniture) FLAMILY/FRAMILY
  14. 14. THE POTENTIAL The products that currently cater to the flamily/framily are marketed under a broader umbrella of young India’s changing lifestyles. With some modifications to products or communications, there is huge potential to reach and resonate with this growing consumer segment. FLAMILY/FRAMILY
  15. 15. IMAGINE … Maggi Twin pack, advertised as the ―Flatmate Pack‖—a What about television that A flat-share fridge that has four minor change in packaging provides user profiles when you with the same Maggi inside. doors with four keys. Now you turn it on, like Xbox or PS3? My don’t have to ask, ―Who ate my favorite channels and programs cheese?‖ need not be my friend’s favorites. Virgin, which targets young consumers, could offer Flatmate Credit/Friends Credit, allowing customers to loan some of their balance to friends without being charged by the service provider. FLAMILY/FRAMILY
  16. 16. IMAGINE … Most young singles living together have colorful, imaginative flats. Why do white goods have to be boring white or dull gray? Why not a fridge with a giant Bob Marley motif? Or a washing machine with marble-effect coloring? Furniture and home living companies have not woken up to the flamily. They could use their significant retail space in malls to create sections for flat sharing that offer affordable but stylish designs made out of recycled or natural material. How about ―flatmate health insurance‖ as a bundling technique? Everybody pools in for the premium, as they are far from home and may not be ready to spend thousands of rupees for modern health care in case of an emergency. FLAMILY/FRAMILY
  17. 17. MARRIED SINGLES 17 Photo credit: boltron-
  18. 18. THE TREND More and more couples are retaining or trying to retain their ―single‖ identity and lifestyle. With spouses maintaining separate rooms, bathrooms, cars and/or TVs, and shopping, socializing and traveling with friends rather than their spouse, it’s almost like two single people living together. MARRIED SINGLES
  19. 19. THE DRIVERS • The trend toward delayed marriages: People are finding it difficult to surrender the ―space‖ they’ve become accustomed to. • The rise of the nuclear family and decline of the extended family (in the extended family setup, it’s less likely that the couple would live independent lives). • Dual-income households: With both spouses working, it’s more difficult to carve out time to spend together. • Increased prosperity: Spouses have more resources with which to maintain two independent lifestyles under one roof. • Increased connectivity: The Internet and mobile phones give people always-on connectivity to the ―single‖ world even when they’re at home. MARRIED SINGLES
  20. 20. TILL OUR “SINGLE” WAYS DO US PART Till death do us part seems an obsolete concept. Now even vacations are enough reason for urban couples to part ways. Deanne Pandey parties often without Take, for example, Nilanjan and Sharmistha Roy of Kolkata. Chikki, her husband, because he hates [They] always part ways during vacation times, simply because partying and would rather be home with they have different tastes and preferences. … Sharmistha heads the kids. In fact, after each of her babies, to her elder sister’s home in Bangalore where she can spend she took a break and went out for a small some time with her maternal family. Nilanjan, on the other holiday with friends and Chikki stayed home hand, would be joining his office colleagues for a hiking with the kids. Does this cause any rancor expedition to the Himalayas. between them? She doesn’t feel so. —―Till Holidays Do Us Part,‖ The Tribune, June 19, 2010 —―Of the Rocking Parties Alone and the Shaking Relationships,‖ MeriNews, Oct. 21, 2007 This couple’s other space frontiers include separate bathrooms and separate suitcases. After four years together, they’ve worked out all the details. He loves playing cricket on Saturdays so she does her own thing; every time she wants the house to herself for a girls’ night in, he makes alternative plans. Like with most things in a relationship, there are no rights or wrongs, just what works for you. —―Space, the Final (Couples) Frontier,‖ LiveMint.com, June 18, 2010 MARRIED SINGLES
  21. 21. TIMES OF INDIA CELEBRATES INDEPENDENCE IN MARRIAGE Many educated, independent-minded young people don’t want to compromise their beliefs and lifestyle when they marry. In response, Times of India introduced ―Equality Matrimonials‖ to its Sunday matrimonial classifieds, declaring: ―This space … regards marriage as a true partnership placing both people on an equal footing.‖ An Equality Marriage Manifesto includes the provision that ―Personal preferences, including those related to dress, food and hobbies, will be respected, with no pressure from in-laws or relatives.‖ And one ad targeting women asks, ―Does hello to marriage mean goodbye to life as you know it?‖ MARRIED SINGLES
  22. 22. THE POTENTIAL The tendency to maintain two lifestyles within one marriage will create more demand—two cars, two TVs, etc. Individuality/freedom/choice will emerge as areas around which brands can have conversations (i.e., brands that offer more ―me time‖). On the flip side, brands can help the independent-minded become accustomed to the compromises that come with couplehood. Marketers can find ways of facilitating those relationships, bringing the married couple closer together. MARRIED SINGLES
  23. 23. IMAGINE … Innovations around ―his‖ and ―her‖ variants of TVs, automobiles, bank accounts, gym memberships, etc. Holiday packages that celebrate continued ―singlehood,‖ where each spouse can travel with his/her own friends. Household cleaning brands that speak to a more equitable division of labor within the home. Male/female TV channels. Classes for things typically male/female—fixing the car, commando training, cooking, stitching. MARRIED SINGLES
  24. 24. DELAYED PARENTHOOD 24 Photo credit: hfb
  25. 25. THE TREND Most urban couples are deferring kids from the first year of marriage to two to four years post-marriage. DELAYED PARENTHOOD
  26. 26. THE DRIVERS • The rise of the nuclear family: Young couples are moving away from the traditional extended-family setup and the expectations and pressures that go with it. • Perfect lives: Set up as a nuclear family, newlyweds are enjoying their couplehood and the fruits of Double Income No Kids; they want to prolong a lifestyle that will inevitably change once a baby arrives. • Reduced parental influence: With the rise of nuclear families and more couples living in different cities than their parents, familial pressure is limited to that once-a-week phone call. • Delayed responsibility: The couple can continue to act almost as if they are still single rather than live the conventional married lifestyle (see Married Singles). • Birth control: Couples are more aware of their options, thanks to the government’s aggressive family-planning campaign, as well as wider availability of birth control. • Body beautiful: Today it’s not enough to look good until marriage; you want to maintain your looks for life. Women don’t want to lose the body they’ve worked hard to achieve. DELAYED PARENTHOOD
  27. 27. THE POTENTIAL With the phase between marriage and parenthood getting longer, couples have more discretionary income—especially if both spouses are working— and more reasons to splurge on each other. The couple are still in lovers mode, as opposed to providers. They’re discovering each other and finding new dimensions of their union, especially in the case of arranged marriages. Brands can connect by portraying them as such. With parenthood delayed, it is that much more revered, and the couple likely has more money than their earlier counterparts. So when the baby does come, parents are prone to spend more on the new arrival. There is an opportunity to dramatize and romanticize the first pregnancy even more and to add luxury to every step of this pregnancy. DELAYED PARENTHOOD
  28. 28. IMAGINE … Second honeymoons Couples-only events/trips/retreats First-anniversary celebrations (jewelry brands/luxury brands) Catering to everything around the baby: fashion, accessories, new gadgets to help mother and baby Fashion-forward maternity clothing, as seen with offerings from FabIndia and U.K.-based Mothercare, which has outlets in India. Products addressing the health needs of the older mother DELAYED PARENTHOOD
  29. 29. LOOKING FORWARD— AND BACK 29 Photo credits: Shannon Clark
  30. 30. THE TREND With one foot firmly rooted in tradition and the other springboarding into modernity, India is teetering between two mind-sets. As the rush toward modernization drives forward, each proceeding generation experiences a dilution or loss of heritage when it comes to language, rituals, food, entertainment, dress, values, beliefs and so on. As a result, age-old practices and ways of being are acquiring a new luster among those wishing to reconnect with India’s rich cultural traditions. This is a maturing trend. LOOKING FORWARD—AND BACK
  31. 31. THE DRIVERS • More nuclear families: With only two generations living under one roof, there are fewer elders around to teach the next generation rituals and traditions. • More mixed marriages: When each parent has a different set of regional traditions, either one or both of these gets lost. (For example, parents are often multilingual, while children typically speak only one language well—the one they’re taught in school.) • Dual-income households: With both spouses working, there’s less time to pass on traditions and skills. • Migration: More people are moving to mass centers of homogenization, where their day-to-day lives lack exposure to their traditional culture and they begin to adopt the ways of those around them. • Globalization: This brings increased choices and media exposure to global products. LOOKING FORWARD—AND BACK
  32. 32. WESTERN PUSH INDIAN PULL WEST VS. English-language instruction has grown five-fold over the EAST last 15 years into an $11-20 million industry, according to The Wall Street Journal. And last year The Times of India reported that Mumbai schools, noted for their Marathi language education, have seen a drop in enrollment for instruction in the mother tongue; According to The Financial Express, ―the number of instead, English has steadily gained popularity. regional channels [grew] from 114 in 2008 to 135 in 2009. In comparison, only three new Hindi GECs (general entertainment channels) were added during the same period." A slew of animated children’s The sari is falling out of favor with shows based on Hindu mythology young women across India. According to has been popping up after a 20- a 2009 Time article, Kanjeevaram year dearth of such programming. weavers, famous for their silk saris, But today’s animated gods don’t sold $12 million worth of saris in 2008, just fight demons, they snowboard down from $40 million in 2004. and play ice-hockey. According to livemint.com, these shows outrank traditional Western favorites such as Tom and Jerry and Popeye. LOOKING FORWARD—AND BACK
  33. 33. BRANDS BRIDGING THE GAP? These products and services (both homegrown and Western) celebrate Indian tradition while integrating elements of modernity—such as prepackaged or fast foods suited to a fast-paced urban lifestyle—and a liberalized Indian mind-set. Domino’s offers a Fashion designer Anita Dongre’s Global Desi and range of pizzas In February 2010, McCain iinter-pret labels fuse Indian and Western elements, inspired by Indian launched Masala Fries, a incorporating traditional cuts, colors and patterns flavors and dishes. typical French fry with Masala into Western looks. seasoning. When McDonald’s entered India in 1996, it replaced its trademark beef burger with the Aloo McTikki sandwich, a ―Kitchens of India recreates the forgotten variation on the potato-based delicacies of a bygone era, when Maharajas Indian dish. ruled the land and cooking was an art perfected by few. Every Kitchens of India recipe has been developed and perfected by Tanishq, a well-known jewelry brand, is the Master Chefs of ITC’s award-winning lightheartedly tackling the new dynamic gourmet restaurants, renowned for their between parents—the traditional matchmakers— delectable and authentic Indian cuisine.‖ and their more modern daughters. In this TV (Company website.) spot, the lure of lavish wedding jewelry helps open a daughter’s mind to the prospect of meeting a match. LOOKING FORWARD—AND BACK
  34. 34. BRANDS BRIDGING THE GAP & TAKING A LEAP FORWARD Recently, brands have been taking this a step further, creating products that pay homage to regional differences across India. Future Group recently launched the Ektaa brand of food products, designed to cater to Introduced in 1999, Kurkure, a Cheetos-like snack adapted the range of tastes and preferences across to local tastes, ―helped create a bridge category between India. The first line consists of five varieties Indian namkeens [snacks] and Western offerings like potato of rice from various Indian states. chips [and cheese balls],‖ says Deepika Warrier, marketing director for PepsiCo Holdings India. Earlier this year, the brand launched three flavors based on regional spices. LOOKING FORWARD—AND BACK
  35. 35. THE POTENTIAL As Eastern and Western cultures continue to blend, there’s appeal in marketing messages that ramp up tradition and nostalgia, painting the past with images of purity and glorifying an uncorrupted culture. By closely aligning themselves with cultural roots and explaining regional origins, brands can become an extension of traditional communities— passing on cultural histories to the next generation. It’s unlikely the Western way of life will completely replace Indian tradition. Instead, we’ll have a redefinition of what it means to be Indian in today’s globalized world. Brands are in a unique position to help bridge the divide between new and old ways by showing how a liberalized Indian mind-set can be expressed within traditional cultural norms. LOOKING FORWARD—AND BACK
  36. 36. IMAGINE … In addition to playing up local or regional heritage in ready-to-eat packaged foods or clothing, brands can leverage this trend in other ways: Financial brands based on the Indian culture of savings, debit/credit Courses to teach traditions (rituals, dance, cooking, etc.) Literature, games, entertainment infused with tradition LOOKING FORWARD—AND BACK
  37. 37. SIN-ECONOMY 37 Photo credit: Sistak
  38. 38. THE TREND Indians have traditionally adhered to a set of deeply ingrained values revolving around fairness, family and religion. This sense of morality has been propagated by and reflected in literature, cinema and television. But in recent years, the social system of checks and balances has started coming undone. As people break free from the culture of self-restraint, they are breaking longstanding taboos. Vice is nice, and indulgence is out of the closet. This shift isn’t simply about overeating, it’s about eating beef. This trend is maturing among media outlets and consumers but emerging among brands. SIN-ECONOMY
  39. 39. THE DRIVERS • More flexible religious interpretation: As the reins of religion are loosened, so too are ideas about what’s right and wrong. • Urban migration: Living away from their family and community, people are free from the restrictions and judgments traditionally placed on them. • Access to global media and technology: While Indian media once emphasized adherence to strict moral guidelines, it now mirrors the racier themes featured in Western media. • More disposable income: Where past generations would have focused on building up savings, the lifestyles of today’s upwardly mobile middle-class Indians are focused around entertainment, pleasure and self-indulgence. • A more competitive generation: Having grown up in an economically strong and liberalized India, the youngest generation is very competitive. They’ve seen new opportunities open up, and there’s a strong desire to seize them—to get ahead at all costs. SIN-ECONOMY
  40. 40. SIN TAKES HOLD The Indian market for beer, wine and spirits grew by 84 percent between 2004 and 2009, from 1,781.8 million liters to 3,276.6 million liters, according to a December 2009 Euromonitor International report. In an upcoming reality show on MTV India, Eristoff Male Fantasy 101, four young guys will be showered with hot women, flashy cars, Gambling is highly regulated in India, and illegal gambling is big business (an estimated a swanky pad, VIP access to exclusive clubs $40 billion industry). The first legally sanctioned casino opened in Goa in 2001, and at and more as they live out their fantasies and least six more have followed. In 2009 Sikkim became the second Indian state to allow compete to win tickets to an Eristoff vodka casinos and in May 2010 the first to allow sports betting beyond horse races. Despite party in an exotic international locale. This attempts to draw international gamblers, ―Indians are the spenders,‖ an exec from follows on the heels of popular MTV shows Highstreet Cruises and Entertainment told the BBC in July. such as Splitsvilla and MTV Roadies. Despite a ban on the sale of tobacco products to minors, the Global Youth Tobacco Survey found the percentage of Ads for watch and accessory brand Titan Indian tobacco users aged 13-15 was at 22 Fast Track feature youth shamelessly percent among males and 9.6 percent among flaunting their ability to move from one females last year. The World Health romantic interest to the next, lying and Organization predicts tobacco-related deaths cheating in the process. The message: It’s will rise to 13.3 percent of all deaths by cool to ―move on.‖ 2020, from 1.4 percent in 1990. SIN-ECONOMY
  41. 41. THE POTENTIAL Conversation about what was long considered taboo is becoming mainstream. As segments of Indian society move from repression to expression, the sin economy is a symbol of all that’s new, experimental and exciting in this world of seemingly infinite opportunity. Not surprisingly, sin categories are already leveraging this trend. The next challenge for brands is finding ways to make ―good‖ more intelligent and edgy. How can brands inject some sin into non-sin categories, making the good feel indulgent through new product development or brand communications? SIN-ECONOMY
  42. 42. IMAGINE … Sin holidays Indulgent rewards (e.g., a candy bar positioned as a sinful midday treat) Apparel and accessory makers adding items that loosen up conservative looks, allowing people to add a gently provocative note without leaving their comfort zone SIN-ECONOMY
  43. 43. GROWING OLDER YOUNGER 43 Photo credit: HazPhotos
  44. 44. THE TREND The modern and hyper-hectic lifestyles of today’s twenty- and thirtysomethings are affecting their mental and physical health. They are aging faster, facing physical ailments and mental fatigue normally associated with older generations. GROWING OLDER YOUNGER
  45. 45. THE DRIVERS • More sedentary lifestyles: With jobs that are largely desk-based, more people using cars for transportation and a high penetration of consumer durables/appliances, this cohort is less physically active. • Poor sleeping habits: A result of longer and more erratic work hours. • Poor eating habits: As a population ascends the socioeconomic ladder, convenience and fast foods become more accepted and intake of sugar and fats increases. At the same time, food consumption patterns are becoming more irregular. • More stress: Pressure to achieve and perform is taking a toll on mental well-being. More time spent commuting in traffic is exhausting for mind and body. GROWING OLDER YOUNGER
  46. 46. THE FACTS • Incidence of obesity, hypertension, heart disease and other lifestyle diseases is increasing at an alarming rate and occurring at earlier ages. An estimated 40.9 India accounts for 60 percent of heart disease patients worldwide. million Indians suffer from diabetes, the The major causes of heart disease: tobacco use, physical inactivity and an unhealthy diet often linked to that of the developed world. highest number in the world.*** A genetic mutation that puts people at greater risk of heart disease affects 4 percent of Indians vs. 1 percent of the world’s overall population.* Approximately 30 More than a third of Indians age 35 to 64 are at risk of heart disease, vs. 12 percent of million Indians are Americans in the same age cohort.** obese.**** * CNN, April 2009 ** Cardiologist Dr. Naresh Trehan *** Global Health Progress: Innovative Solutions to Improving Health in India, 2010 **** National Family Health Survey, July 2010 GROWING OLDER YOUNGER
  47. 47. GETTING SICKER YOUNGER Forecasting the prevalence rate (%) of coronary heart disease (CHD) in India Estimated mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) Source:NCMH Background Papers—Burden of Disease in India (New Delhi, GROWING OLDER YOUNGER India), September 2005
  48. 48. THE POTENTIAL Taking lessons from the developed world, brands can help to counteract premature aging and head off lifestyle diseases by introducing more healthy alternatives. (This will inevitably work to their advantage, as lifestyle diseases could ultimately be linked to the consumption of their products.) Brands can offer services that help people unwind, relax and rejuvenate. GROWING OLDER YOUNGER
  49. 49. IMAGINE … More fast food and packaged goods brands preemptively introducing healthier and more natural alternatives, as they’re now doing in the West, before they’re accused of aiding and abetting unhealthy lifestyles. Food and beverage brands developing product lines that help thirty-somethings maintain more balanced diets. Pharma brands providing alternative medicines that help in de-stressing. More holiday resorts and spas catering to the need to turn back the clock. Gyms with sections for spas and mental health counseling. Wellness-themed homes Life skills coaching that provides tools to cope with high-performance situations. GROWING OLDER YOUNGER
  50. 50. CATEGORY-SPECIFIC TRENDS 50 Photo credits (clockwise from top left): keithpr, courtneyBolton, clevercupcakes, Image Triangle India, SummerTomato
  51. 51. SNACKING HOLIDAYS The Trend The Drivers The Potential Imagine … Snacking holidays—short More pressure: Work Beyond the travel, tourism Brand-sponsored ―no cooking breaks rather than regular schedules make it difficult to and associated categories, Sundays‖ or ―no studying holiday getaways—are gaining take a long leave. this trend has potential for Fridays‖ to provide a small popularity in tandem with the brands that provide escapism escape from routine. rapidly increasing pace of More budget airlines and at home or at work or those life. hotels to make trips that offer unplanned and/or Bite-sizing going beyond just affordable. bite-sized rewards or holiday bookings: ―snacking experiments. degrees‖ (e.g., a two-week A counter to the daily slog: filmmaking course), three- Snacking acts as a mood lifter month car leases, try-before and reward, and a way to you-buy schemes, etc. beat monotony. Food and beverage brands Social capital: Snacking developing new flavors to holidays provide some social reflect broadening tastes and currency. cultural experiences. Greater interest in Brands sponsoring tech experimenting: People can platforms for sharing holiday try out a new destination or photos/experiences. activity without having to commit to a full week or In fashion and home décor, two. brands offering more ―escapist‖ colors (cool neutrals). 51
  52. 52. TECHNOLOGY IS THE NEW SIGNET RING The Trend The Drivers The Potential Imagine … The class system is being The rise of the IT industry in As more people start carrying FMCG brands appropriating reorganized, with techno- India and image of the technology for its symbolic technology values or mavens sitting at the top. Technocrat. rather than its functional increasing the ―techiness‖ of Flaunting and mastering value, technology that can be their design and packaging to technology are the new signs The increased penetration of flashed or displayed will stay aspirational. of status. and opportunities created by benefit. mobile telephony. More collaborations with tech Acquiring and then mastering Since technology can have a brands (think Nike+). technology, its complexity Techno bling: The rise of and democratizing effect, luxury and its everyday evolution is increased access to techno- technology will serve as a Skins on household the logical extension of cool products. way to separate the masses electronics. India’s focus on math and from the elite—for example, science mastery. Film stars and the global Vertu phones and high-end Creative markers of elite media glorifying new music and home theater status—i.e. making the technology accessories, systems. latest, greatest gadget making them a symbol of available by invitation only. success. We may see a shift in emphasis in India from IT Family trees: ―Other leaders services to manufacturing who have bought this product technology/tech products think this or have bought that and consumer technology. …‖ Using technology for altruism as the ultimate sign of supremacy. 52
  53. 53. GIFTING GOOD HEALTH The Trend The Drivers The Potential Imagine … Gifting is moving from giving A larger ―urban Robin Hood‖ Brands can build consumer A bra brand gifting a free products (perfumes, trend—the desire to do good connections at a far deeper checkup for breast cancer. chocolates, jewelry, etc.) to for others and for society. level by hitching themselves experiences (day at the spa, to a cause. And there is no A sugar brand offering a tickets to an event, etc.) and Increased health awareness. cause closer to a person’s glucometer. even to well-being itself heart, or more relevant, than (e.g., a glucose meter). More interest in preventive the well-being of loved ones. A laptop brand gifting a hand- health care versus curative, rest and stand to prevent for oneself and loved ones. Brands across categories can back and neck problems. play the Good Samaritan by More interest in standing out: changing the paradigm of An auto brand that has People want to gift gifting itself. ergonomically designed seats something different rather that prevent backache. than recycle the same old things, because a gift says a An alcohol brand partnering lot about the giver. with a car rental company to organize free after-party drop-offs. 53
  54. 54. BRAIN- AND BEAUTY- BOOSTING NUTRITION The Trend The Drivers The Potential Imagine … With nutrition taking center A shift toward seeing food as As India catches up to An Ayurvedic knowledge stage in preventive health more than just sustenance. markets such as Japan, transfer to the global beauty care, nutritional supplements Europe and the U.S.—which marketplace—multinational and fortified foods and A shift toward preventive have driven the growth of players entering India, beverages will proliferate. therapies. nutraceuticals—the lines looking to diversify their The focus will be on between pharmaceuticals, natural solutions portfolios. enhancing and preserving Increasing media awareness nutrition and personal care cognitive health (for senior of the foods and ingredients will continue to blur. Greater India’s belief in mind-body citizens and children) and that can enhance beauty/ awareness of the effect of connection finding expression beauty (for the 35-49 brain power. nutrition on beauty and in everything from beverages cohort). cognitive health will prompt to shoes. As this trend ramps More R&D focused on more collaboration among up, watch for more brands The total market for nutraceuticals, plus growth in brands in these categories. like Biotique, whose food and nutraceuticals in India, Ayurvedic and other natural personal care items are based valued at INR 44bn, is remedies. Commodities will get on traditional Ayurvedic growing by 21 percent branded, fortified. principles. annually, according to a 2009 Ongoing emphasis on report from Netscribes intelligence, competition and (India). learning as a means to climb the social strata. Explosive growth of education industry. Rising disposable income and an increase in health care spending. 54
  55. 55. HAMPER PAMPER The Trend The Drivers The Potential Imagine … As Indian consumers grow Rising affluence and more Across categories, brands Infusing luxury into everyday increasingly affluent, they disposable income. have opportunities to experiences (banking, retail, are seeking world-class introduce high-value luxury etc.). luxuries—they believe they Since they have strived hard items that satisfy affluent deserve the best. The value to get where they are, Indians’ need to pamper Dedicated luxury shopping equation is no longer simple, affluent Indians believe they themselves. But luxury must areas and neighborhoods, like as factors like image, world- deserve the best for move from just a purchase to Fifth Avenue in New York and class, premium, cool, etc., themselves. Aspirational an experience; otherwise, Rodeo Drive in Los Angeles. come to play a more products have a heightened high-end consumers will important role. appeal. continue to buy overseas, driven by a less-than-stellar Currently worth around $3 The traditional Indian shopping experience and high billion a year, the premium- mentality of saving for luxury duties. goods industry in India is tomorrow is no longer expected to expand by 25-30 prevalent. People believe in percent annually in the next living to the fullest today. five years.* India’s 120,000 dollar millionaires hold Globalization: Global roughly a third of the exposure has opened a world country’s gross national of possibilities and income, a figure that is rising experiences to the consumer, rapidly.** thereby raising aspirations. Increased competition and improved retail opportunities. 55 *Technopak Advisors **Capgemini and Merrill Lynch Wealth Management
  56. 56. IN CONCLUSION 56 Photo credits (clockwise from top left): Ashok666, boltron-, hfb, HazPhotos, Sistak, judepics
  57. 57. IN CONCLUSION Several factors—urban migration, the rise of the nuclear family, modernization, etc.—are changing relationship dynamics, from the adoption of friends as family to the continuation of single-type lifestyles post-marriage to delayed parenthood. With some modifications to products or communications, there is huge potential to reach and resonate with these growing consumer segments. The push-pull between modernity and tradition will become more exaggerated as the sin economy takes hold. Brands are in a unique position to help bridge the divide between new and old ways by showing how a liberalized Indian mind-set can be expressed within traditional cultural norms. As lifestyles get faster paced, health is becoming compromised. Taking lessons from the developed world, brands can help to counteract premature aging and head off lifestyle diseases by introducing more healthy alternatives. IN CONCLUSION
  58. 58. THANK YOU 58 Ann M. Mack Jessica A. Vaughn JWT Enkay Centre, Block A, Udyog Vihar Director of Trendspotting Trend Strategist Phase 5 JWT Worldwide JWT Worldwide Gurgaon – 122016, ann.mack@jwt.com jessica.vaughn@jwt.com Haryana, India. WWW. JWT.COM | WWW.JWTINTELLIGENCE.COM | WWW.ANXIETYINDEX.COM © 2010 J. Walter Thompson Company. All Rights Reserved.

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