Successfully reported this slideshow.

Social Media: Where We Stand, Where We’re Heading

3

Share

Loading in …3
×
1 of 42
1 of 42

Social Media: Where We Stand, Where We’re Heading

3

Share

Download to read offline

Guest lecture at Elon University on 10/19/12 in COM 371, The Future of the Internet, talking about social media research and thoughts on where social media is heading in the coming years.

Guest lecture at Elon University on 10/19/12 in COM 371, The Future of the Internet, talking about social media research and thoughts on where social media is heading in the coming years.

More Related Content

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

Social Media: Where We Stand, Where We’re Heading

  1. 1. Social Media: Where We Stand, Where We’re Heading Jessica Vitak University of Maryland October 19, 2012 jvitak@umd.edu / @jvitak 1
  2. 2. What is social media? Social (adj): relating to human society and its members. Media (n): storage and transmission channels or tools used to store and deliver information or data. Takeaways: 1. Social media is not a new phenomenon. 2
  3. 3. 3
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. What is social media? Social (adj): relating to human society and its members. Media (n): storage and transmission channels or tools used to store and deliver information or data. Takeaways: 1. Social media is not a new phenomenon. 2. Social media is facilitated through technology and evolves with technology. 8
  9. 9. Social Media Since 2000 Key difference: Publishing (Web 1.0) vs. Participation (Web 2.0) 9
  10. 10. Key Feature #1: User-Generated Content 10
  11. 11. 11
  12. 12. Unmasking Reddit’s Violentacrez, The Biggest Troll on the Web 12 October 12, 2012
  13. 13. Key feature #2 Social bookmarking/Social tagging 13
  14. 14. 14
  15. 15. 15
  16. 16. Key Feature #3: Interaction Drives Communities 16
  17. 17. Social Network Sites Defined All SNSs have three main features: 1) A uniquely identifiable profile 2) List of connections (e.g., “Facebook Friends”) 3) Users can consume, produce, and interact with content Ellison & boyd (in press) 17
  18. 18. Who uses SNSs? Source: Madden & Zickhur, 2011. Pew Internet Project. 18
  19. 19. SNS users are more likely to be: • Women • Young No statistically significant differences based on: • Race • Income • Education • Geographic location 19 Source: Madden & Zickhur, 2011. Pew Internet Project.
  20. 20. Why do people use SNSs? Joinson (2008) Papacharissi & Mendelson (2011) • Social connection • Expressive info seeking • Shared identities • Habitual pass time • Viewing/sharing photos • Relaxing entertainment • Social investigation • Cool, new trend • Social network surfing • Companionship • Status updating • Professional achievement • Escape • Social interaction • Meet new people 20
  21. 21. What SNS users do: “Liking” 21
  22. 22. What SNS users do: Commenting 22
  23. 23. What SNS users do: Broadcasting 23
  24. 24. What SNS users do: Private Messages 24
  25. 25. Impression Management on SNSs Impression Management: Sum of behaviors individuals engage in to either control or manipulate observers’ attributions of them 25
  26. 26. Negative effects of SNSs Interactions on these sites are real. • USATODAY: Political spats on Facebook spill into real life Assuming privacy is always a bad idea. • Eagles’ employee loses job after badmouthing team decision on his Facebook page. • Bank intern fired after calling in sick & getting caught through Facebook pictures. 26
  27. 27. Benefits to Using SNSs Social Capital: original “friends with benefits”  benefits derived from interactions with your social network Bridging Bonding 27
  28. 28. Bridging Social Capital 28
  29. 29. Bonding Social Capital 29
  30. 30. Recent Research Does use of Facebook for political purposes have any tangible impact on participation? Vitak et al. (2011) • Study of undergrads use of Facebook in month prior to 2008 presidential election • Those who were highly engaged in political activity on FB were highly engaged elsewhere • Those who reported seeing their Friends post political content were more likely to be politically 30 active
  31. 31. Recent Research How do students use Facebook to collaborate on school work? Lampe et al. (2011) Positive Collaboration • Arrange group meeting • Ask for help • Manage group project Negative Collaboration • Sharing homework answers • Sharing quiz/test answers 31
  32. 32. Recent Research Can Facebook help improve college adjustment and retention? Gray et al. (2012) Example: Inigral’s Schools application Facebook + Bonding Collaboration Social Behaviors Capital + College + Social + Persistence Friends on Adjustment 32 Facebook at College to College
  33. 33. Research at MSU Tong et al. (2008): When you have too many “friends” on a SNS, people How much I like you rate you as less socially attractive # of FB Friends Total FB Friends • Ellison, Steinfield, & Lampe (2011) • Actual friends matter more than Actual total friends when it comes to Friends perceptions of social capital 33 Among undergrads: 25% Among MSU staff: 37%
  34. 34. What does it mean to be a Facebook “Friend”? • Robin Dunbar claims you can only manage meaningful relationships with 150 people. Dunbar: “Our minds are not designed to allow us to have more than a very limited number of people in our social world. The emotional and psychological investments that a close relationship requires are considerable, and the emotional capital we have 34 available is limited.”
  35. 35. Facebook users have *a lot* of Friends • Vitak (2012): Most users reported having many Facebook Friends 2nd • M = 500, Median = 433, SD = Tier 361, range: 62 – 1600 • And many were weak ties Weak Ties • 8% of network considered close ties 3rd Tier • 52% of network considered very weak ties 35
  36. 36. Pew data: SNS users vs. non- users • How big is your social network? • Average American: 634 ties • Average Internet user (669) vs. non-user (506) ties • Average cell phone user: 664 ties • Average SNS user: 636 ties 36 * Source: Hampton et al. (2011)
  37. 37. SNSs & Context Collapse Selective Self-Presentation: We present different versions of the self depending on our audience Ego Context collapse occurs when we “perform” for different audiences at same time (e.g., weddings) 37
  38. 38. Context Collapse on Facebook 38
  39. 39. Impact of Context Collapse Marwick & boyd (2011) • Treat public space (Twitter) as if it were bounded Vitak, Lampe, Gray, & Ellison (2012) • Strategies for maintaining work/personal life boundary Vitak (2012) • Engaging with privacy features • Increased disclosures • Increased perceptions of social capital 39
  40. 40. Future of Social Media? Depends largely on how companies handle users current concerns. When using Facebook, users are most concerned about:* 1. Personal information being sold to other companies for marketing purposes. 2. Their account being compromised (e.g., their ID & password posted online). 3. Personal information like a phone number or email address becoming publicly visible. 4. Someone hacking their account & being unable to access it. 5. Private messages becoming publicly visible. 40 * This is based on a new dataset that is still being collected, so any statements based on this are purely speculative.
  41. 41. Future of Social Media? Social relationships will always matter. Period. What could alter the balance is trust. These companies focus on CONTROL OF INFORMATION. 41 What they don’t have is the embedded networks that Facebook does.
  42. 42. Thanks! Jessica Vitak University of Maryland iSchool Page: http://ischool.umd.edu/faculty-staff/jessica-vitak Email: jvitak@umd.edu Twitter: @jvitak Homepage: http://jessicavitak.com Academia: http://umd.academia.edu/JessicaVitak Google Citations Page: http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=RC9bN7kAAAAJ&hl=e n 42

Editor's Notes

  • Pinterest is mainly women (80%).Mainly adults 25-45
  • ×