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Youth & Digital Media: Increasing LIteracies & Minimizing Risks

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I presented this talk to counselors and educators for an independent school district in Texas. It was intended to provide a contextual understanding of teens' digital media practices by situating them within historical and developmental contexts. The primary purpose was to demonstrate the need for adults and youth-focused institutions to support the development of digital media literacies. Rather than taking a "don't take any risks" approach or a "media are dangerous approach", this talk focuses on the positive ways young people engage with digital media for the purposes of identity exploration, socialization, learning, creativity, and autonomy. Developing digital media literacies, including network and social literacies, empowers students to actively and responsibly participate in the creation of their own media ecologies.

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Youth & Digital Media: Increasing LIteracies & Minimizing Risks

  1. 1. Dr. Jacqueline Ryan Vickery, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Radio, Television, & Film College of Arts & Sciences University of North Texas Email: jacqueline.vickery@unt.edu Twitter: @JacVick Faculty: rtvf.unt.edu Personal: jvickery.com
  2. 2. B.A. in Communication, 2006 University of Oklahoma
  3. 3. M.A. in Media Studies, 2008 Ph.D. in Media Studies, 2012 University of Texas
  4. 4. Tenure-Track Research Professor University of North Texas 2012-current
  5. 5. Associated Researcher The Digital Edge clrn.dmlhub.net
  6. 6. Worth the Risk: The Role of Regulations and Norms in Shaping Teens’ Digital Media Practices
  7. 7. In Her Own Words: Analyzing Girls’ Identities, Communities, and Cultures through Blogs
  8. 8. Social context Historical context Agency Ingenuity Creativity Autonomy
  9. 9. “Kids need someone to watch their back and not snoop over their shoulders. They need adults who are as engaged in their online lives as they are with their offline lives – not less and not more.” - Henry Jenkins
  10. 10. Identity
  11. 11. Autonomy Create
  12. 12. design network Information social
  13. 13. Social Literacy “The ability to understand and operate successfully within a complex and interdependent social world. It involves the acquisition of the skills of active and confident social participation, including the skills, knowledge and attitudes necessary for making reasoned judgments in a community…Social literacy is concerned with the empowerment of the social and ethical self which includes the ability to understand and explain differences within individual experiences.” Arthur & Davinson
  14. 14. Network Literacy “the ability to effectively tap social networks to disperse one's own ideas and media products” Henry Jenkins “unlike print literacy, in network literacy we become peers in the system and indeed to be ‘good’ at network literacies is to contribute as much as it is to consume” Adrian Miles
  15. 15. “Network literacy means linking to what other people have written and inviting comments from others, it means understanding a kind of writing that is a social, collaborative process rather than an act of an individual in solitary. It means learning how to write with an awareness that anyone may read it: your mother, a future employer or the person whose work you're writing about.” Adrian Miles
  16. 16. “One of the most urgent challenges regarding technology, diversity, and equity is the need to expand digital literacy; that is, the development of young people’s capacity not only to access and use digital media but to use digital media in ways that create more enhanced and more empowered expressions of learning, creative expression, and civic engagement.” S. Craig Watkins
  17. 17. literacy risk
  18. 18. Risk Harm
  19. 19. Adults Literacies Strategies
  20. 20. References • Arthur, James and Davinson, Jon. (2000). Social Literacy and Citizenship Education in the School Curriculum. The Curriculum Journal, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 9-23. • Jenkins, Henry. (2006). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture (Part Six). Confessions of an Aca-Fan. • Miles, Adrian (2007). Network Literacy: The New Path to Knowledge. Screen Education Autumn.45, pp. 24-30. • Vickery, J.R. (2012). Worth the Risk: The Role of Regulations and Norms in Shaping Teens’ Digital Media Practices. University of Texas, Dissertation Repository. • Watkins, S. Craig (2012). Digital Divide: Navigating the Digital Edge. International Journal of Learning and Media, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 1-12.
  21. 21. Dr. Jacqueline Ryan Vickery, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Department of Radio, Television, & Film College of Arts & Sciences University of North Texas Email: jacqueline.vickery@unt.edu Twitter: @JacVick Faculty: rtvf.unt.edu Personal: jvickery.com

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