Knowledge Management 2009 (2)

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Knowledge Management 2009 (2)

  1. 1. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation1 Knowledge Management 2009 Course 2 Tim Hoogenboom & Bolke de Bruin http://www.timhoogenboom.nl
  2. 2. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation2 Contents of Today • Recapitulating last week • On social learning – Understanding the components – Understanding his argument • A short preview on practice and identity – And how both terms are quite difficult to capture • Why is Wenger social learning relevant • Assignment
  3. 3. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation3 Wrapping it Up
  4. 4. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation4 Look at the world • Information Management and Knowledge Management predominantly objectivistic • Objectivism does not provide a solid foundation for Information Management, nor Knowledge Management • Subjectivism does not provide a solid foundation for Information Management, nor Knowledge Management • So we need to combine reification and participation
  5. 5. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation5 Enter Social Media! Specialist laude the social media revolution: • Internet is becoming more and more ‘social’ is proclaimed • Social software contributes to learning competences of its participants is proclaimed • <<web2.0>> examples • However do we truly understand such a subjectivistic outlook on IT- based systems? If so, what is our design theory to organize for social learning, if not we are walking on thin ice
  6. 6. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation6 Indeterminedness of Reality • Our engineering methods help us in dealing predictable social configuration, dealing with tame problems. • Traditional engineering methods succeed less designing for wicked problems, as social reality is. The question is then: How do we deal with these subjectivistic/wicked conceptions of learning that we envisage in social media
  7. 7. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation7 We know how to be social? • Undersocialized conceptions of human action. • Oversocialized conceptions of human action. • The isle of Utopia has never been build, although prescribed fairly accurately by Thomas More… • Perhaps a realistic conception of the social is something IT professionals interpret, yet do not understand
  8. 8. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation8 Positioning Wenger • Social Learning Theory • Design for Communities of Practice objectivism subjectivism information 1 2 knowledge 3 4
  9. 9. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation9 Social Learning
  10. 10. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation10 Wenger • global thought leader in the field of communities of practice and social learning systems • An educational theorist and practitioner • Guest lecturer at the University of Amsterdam - EXIM • Social learning theory • Currently investigating ways of stewarding technology for communities (appeared 15th august 2009)
  11. 11. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation11 Why do we need new theory • “Perhaps more than learning itself, it is our conception of learning that needs urgent attention” (p.9) • Current notions on learning see learning as disembodied from daily practice, but reserved to sterile learning environments. • Here, Wenger introduces the concept of social learning • Assertion: Community of Practice is the form of organizing that enables social learning the best
  12. 12. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation12 Social Learning Theory • Four presmises – We humans are social beings; – Knowing is a participating in pursuing an enterprise; – Knowledge then is a matter of competence accomplished in pursuing these enterprises; and – Meaning is what learning is to produce. • Social Learning Theory Learning in a fundamental social phenomenon, rooted in doing, by being active participants in practices while constructing identities.
  13. 13. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation13 Assumptions on learning • Learning is part of human nature (p.3) • Learning is, in its essence, a fundamental social phenomenon (p.3) • Learning is the ability the to negotiate new meanings (p.215) • Learning means dealing with boundaries (p.140) • Learning changes our identity (p.215) • Learning creates emergent structures (p.96) • Learning need trajectories for the individual and the collective (p.155) • Learning is about direct social energy and power (p.219) • Learning is a case of engagement (p.217) • Learning is a case of imagination (p.217) • Learning is a case of alignment (p.217) • Learning is an interplay between the local and the global (p.141) • Learning cannot be designed, it can only be designed for - that is facilitated or frustrated (p. 229)
  14. 14. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation14 Components of (social) learning Learning is an individual process – no, it’s social too Learning has a beginning and an end – no, it’s continuous and life-long Learning is best done in separate environments – no, in social practices Learning is the result of teaching – no, learning is part of everyday life
  15. 15. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation15 Positioning
  16. 16. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation16 Design Interventions
  17. 17. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation17 Designing for Participation Learning can’t be designed – it can only be frustrated or facilitated
  18. 18. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation18 A Design Framework ENGAGEMENT IMAGINATION ALIGNMENT PARTICIPATION/ REIFICATION Combining them meaningfully in actions, interactions and creation of shared histories Stories, playing with forms, recombinations, assumptions Styles and discourses DESIGNED/ EMERGENT Situated improvisation within a regime of mutual accountability Scenarios, possible worlds, simulations, perceiving new broad patterns Communication, feedback, coordination, renegotiation, realignment LOCAL/ GLOBAL Multi-membership, brokering, peripherality, conversations Models, maps, representations, visits, tours Standards, shared infrastructures, centers of authority IDENTIFICATION/ NEGOTIABILITY Mutuality through shared action, situated negotiation, marginalization New trajectories, empathy, stereotypes, explanations Inspirations, fields of influence, reciprocity of power relations
  19. 19. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation19 Practice and Identity • Practice is that what binds communities of practice together • Identity is that what makes members construe through participating in communities
  20. 20. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation20 Relevance Social Learning • Social Learning Theory adds realism, to oversocialized and undersocialized conceptions • Wenger enables us to design social configuration that afford for learning • Understanding how people belong, is highly relevant in today’s networked sociality. • It could help us to build theory, in able to build truly social software
  21. 21. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation21 Assignment
  22. 22. Beta - no rights can be derrived from this publication.Beta - Actual content may differ from this presentation22 Assignment

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